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175

The term "referential transparency" comes from analytical philosophy, the branch of philosophy that analyzes natural language constructs, statements and arguments based on the methods of logic and mathematics. In other words, it is the closest subject outside computer science to what we call programming language semantics. The philosopher Quine was ...


107

The Languages We Call Haskell unsafePerformIO is part of the Foreign Function Interface specification, not core Haskell 98 specification. It can be used to do local side effects that don't escape some scope, in order to expose a purely functional interface. That is, we use it to hide effects when the type checker can't do it for us (unlike the ST monad, ...


75

Referential transparency, a term commonly used in functional programming, means that given a function and an input value, you will always receive the same output. That is to say there is no external state used in the function. Here is an example of a referential transparent function: int plusOne(int x) { return x+1; } With a referential transparent ...


54

Take the following mini-language: data Action = Get (Char -> Action) | Put Char Action | End Get f means: read a character c, and perform action f c. Put c a means: write character c, and perform action a. Here's a program that prints "xy", then asks for two letters and prints them in reverse order: Put 'x' (Put 'y' (Get (\a -> Get (\b -> Put ...


50

[This is a postscript to my answer from March 25, in an effort to bring the discussion closer to the concerns of functional/imperative programming.] The functional programmers' idea of referential transparency seems to differ from the standard notion in three ways: Whereas the philosophers/logicians use terms like "reference", "denotation", "designatum" ...


37

A referentially transparent function is one which only depends on its input.


35

Haskell has immutable variables (variables in the math sense) by default: foo x y = x + y * 2 By default variables are not mutable cells. Haskell also has mutable cells though, but you enable them explicitly: > v <- newIORef 0 > readIORef v 0 > writeIORef v 7 > readIORef v 7 So, YES Haskell has true variables. But it does not ...


33

I thought with "purely functional" it was meant that it is impossible to introduce impure code... The real answer is that unsafePerformIO is not part of Haskell, any more than say, the garbage collector or run-time system are part of Haskell. unsafePerformIO is there in the system so that the people who build the system can create a pure functional ...


24

Firstly, getArgs can change at runtime. See withArgs. Secondly, getArgs and getProgName fall into an interesting class of impure computations - they are thought of as constants during a program run, however, they're are not values available at compile time, and they change from one program run to another. They don't have a clean denotation. See e.g. ...


23

I think that doing your computations that require random numbers inside a monad that abstracts away the generator is the cleanest thing. Here is what that code would look like: We are going to put the StdGen instance in a state monad, then provide some sugar over the state monad's get and set method to give us random numbers. First, load the modules: ...


23

To answer such questions, you'll need a foundation: what does it mean that an expression e has type t? You could give arbitrary answers for primitives like getProgName, but you don't have to. Instead, look at the meanings of expressions and of types. Say that an expression e has type t when the value denoted by e (i.e., the meaning of e as a mathematical ...


20

If I gather in one place any three theorists of my acquaintance, at least two of them disagree on the meaning of the term "referential transparency." And when I was a young student, a mentor of mine gave me a paper explaining that even if you consider only the professional literature, the phrase "referentially transparent" is used to mean at least three ...


20

I do not think there's any guarantee that evaluating a polymorphically typed expression such as 5 at different types will produce "compatible" results, for any reasonable definition of "compatible". GHCi session: > class C a where num :: a > instance C Int where num = 0 > instance C Double where num = 1 > num + length [] -- length returns ...


17

The problem is overloading, which does indeed sort of violate referential transparency. You have no idea what something like (+) does in Haskell; it depends on the type. When a numeric type is unconstrained in a Haskell program the compiler uses type defaulting to pick some suitable type. This is for convenience, and usually doesn't lead to any surprises. ...


17

I found the solution: using the forall quantifier like so: {-# LANGUAGE RankNTypes #-} f :: Int -> (forall a. Num a=> a -> a) -> (Rational, Integer) f b g = (h (toRational b) ,h (toInteger b)) where h :: Num a => a -> a h = g Which of course can be turned into: f :: Int -> (forall a. Num a=>a -> a) -> ...


16

GHC doesn't do automatic memoization. See the GHC FAQ on Common Subexpression Elimination (not exactly the same thing, but my guess is that the reasoning is the same) and the answer to this question. If you want to do memoization yourself, then have a look at Data.MemoCombinators. Another way of looking at memoization is to use laziness to take advantage ...


16

There is no need to make a full copy of a Set in order to insert an element into it. Internally, element are stored in a tree, which means that you only need to create new nodes along the path of the insertion. Untouched nodes can be shared between the pre-insertion and post-insertion version of the Set. And as Deitrich Epp pointed out, in a balanced tree ...


15

An expression is referentially transparent if it can be replaced with its value, without changing the algorithm, yielding an algorithm that has the same effects and output on the same input.


15

I thought of something which might help clarify things... The expression mod (7^7^7) 5 has type Integral a so there are two common ways to convert it to an Int: Perform all of the arithmetic using Integer operations and types and then convert the result to an Int. Perform all of the arithmetic using Int operations. If the expression is used in an Int ...


14

There is a number of possible solutions. The simplest one is to alter your function to return stream of events instead of the final result. You sum_of_factors doesn't compile for me, so I'll use a sum function as an example. The idea is to send Left message to show progress, and send Right result when done. Thanks to lazy evaluation, you'll see progress ...


13

The new Racket language (formerly PLT Scheme) allows you to implement any semantics you like with s-expressions (really any syntax). The base language is an eagerly evaluated, dynamically typed scheme variant but some notable languages built on top are a lazy scheme and a functional reactive system called Father Time. An easy way to make a purely functional ...


13

Your mistake is thinking that FP and OO are somehow fundamentally different. The "OO version" of referential transparency is just referential transparency. An expression e is referentially transparent if and only if e can be replaced with its evaluated result without affecting the behavior of the program. So if you have an expression o.foo(a), then it is ...


13

Oleg's work on "concurrent" zippers via delimited continuations is the main reference.


13

Yes! Haskell can do this. The ST monad If you actually use mutable state (registers), that are entirely hidden from the observer outside the function, then you are in the ST monad, a monad for memory effects only. You enter the ST world via runST, and when you exit the function, all effects are guaranteed to not be visible. It is precisely the right ...


12

I'd represent the grid as a list of lists, type [[Bool]]. And I'd define a function to know if a grid element is full: type Grid = [[Bool]] isFullAt :: Grid -> (Int, Int) -> Bool -- returns True for anything off-grid Then I'd define a function to find neighbors: neighbors :: (Int, Int) -> [(Int, Int)] To find non-full neighbors of point you ...


12

You can do this using catch from Control.Exception. Note, however, that you need to be in the IO monad to do this. import qualified Control.Exception as Exc divide :: Float -> Float -> Float divide x 0 = error "Division by 0." divide x y = x / y main :: IO () main = Exc.catch (print $ divide 5 0) handler where handler :: Exc.ErrorCall ...


11

There are two techniques that are used by purely functional programming languages to model side effects: 1) A world type that represents external state, where each value of that type is guaranteed by the type system to be used only once. In a language that uses this approach the function print and read might have the types (string, world) -> world and ...


11

It's really easy. A non-strict (e.g. lazy) evaluation means that tasks can be postponed. But in order to postpone something, you're better sure that you get later that same result as you would get now, and that's referential transparency. Consider this imperative Java code: long start = System.currentTimeMillis(); //get the start time ...


11

error is supposed to be as observable as an infinite loop. You can only catch error in IO, which is like saying "yeah you can if you know magic". But from the really nice part of Haskell, pure code, it is unrecoverable, and thus it is strongly advised not to use in your code, only as much as you would ever use an infinite loop as an error code. ncurses is ...


11

The general-purpose answer to doing compile-time computation is to use Template Haskell. But for this specific use case, you can use the vector package and the LLVM backend, and GHC will optimize away this sum. sorghum:~% cat >test.hs import Data.Vector.Unboxed as V main = print (V.sum $ V.enumFromN (1 :: Int) 10000000) sorghum:~% ghc --make -O2 -fllvm ...



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