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49

The method created via DynamicMethod goes through two thunks, while the method created via Expression<> doesn't go through any. Here's how it works. Here's the calling sequence for invoking fn(0, 1) in the Time method (I hard-coded the arguments to 0 and 1 for ease of debugging): 00cc032c 6a01 push 1 // 1 argument 00cc032e ...


38

I think the key points about CodeDOM and Reflection.Emit are following: CodeDom generates C# source code and is usually used when generating code to be included as part of a solution and compiled in the IDE (for example, LINQ to SQL classes, WSDL, XSD all work this way). In this scenario you can also use partial classes to customize the generated code. It ...


37

When the runtime executes a call instruction it's making a call to an exact piece of code (method). There's no question about where it exists. Once the IL has been JITted, the resulting machine code at the call site is an unconditional jmp instruction. By contrast, the callvirt instruction is used to call virtual methods in a polymorphic way. The exact ...


31

call is for calling non-virtual, static, or superclass methods, i.e., the target of the call is not subject to overriding. callvirt is for calling virtual methods (so that if this is a subclass that overrides the method, the subclass version is called instead).


23

Just an alternative answer; if you want the performance, but a similar API - consider HyperDescriptor; this uses Reflection.Emit underneath (so you don't have to), but exposes itself on the PropertyDescriptor API, so you can just use: PropertyDescriptorCollection props = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(obj); props["Name"].SetValue(obj, "Fred"); DateTime dob = ...


23

That seems duplicate to this question... Which points to MSDN: However, to provide a separate implementation of I.M(), you must define a method body and then use the DefineMethodOverride method to associate that method body with a MethodInfo representing I.M(). The name of the method body does not matter. // Build the method body ...


19

In regular C# / .NET, the answer is a simple "no". The most you can do is write a DynamicMethod which can behave like a method of that type (access to private fields etc), but it won't ever be on the API - you just end up with a delegate. If you use dynamic, you can do pretty much anything you want. You can emulate that with ExpandoObject by attaching ...


18

If you're fetching/setting the same property many times, then using something to build a typesafe method will indeed be faster than reflection. However, I would suggest using Delegate.CreateDelegate instead of Reflection.Emit. It's easier to get right, and it's still blazingly fast. I've used this in my Protocol Buffers implementation and it made a huge ...


17

I did some benchmarking between these (I would write down the bare minimum details): public static T Instance() //~1800 ms { return new T(); } public static T Instance() //~1800 ms { return new Activator.CreateInstance<T>(); } public static readonly Func<T> Instance = () => new T(); //~1800 ms public static readonly Func<T> ...


15

Run ildasm.exe on an arbitrary assembly. Use View + Show token values and look at some disassembled code. You'll see that the IL contains references to other methods and variables through a number. The number is an index into the metadata tables for an assembly. Perhaps you now see the problem, you cannot transplant a chunk of IL from one assembly to ...


14

Use the Ldloc and Stloc opcodes to read and write local variables: LocalBuilder a = ilGen.DeclareLocal(typeof(Int32)); LocalBuilder b = ilGen.DeclareLocal(typeof(Int32)); ilGen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldc_I4, 5); // Store "5" ... ilGen.Emit(OpCodes.Stloc, a); // ... in "a". ilGen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldc_I4, 6); // Store "6" ... ilGen.Emit(OpCodes.Stloc, b); // ... in "b". ...


12

You use a MethodBuilder to define methods. To define the method body, you call GetILGenerator() to get an ILGenerator, and then call the Emit methods to emit individual IL instructions. There is an example on the MSDN documentation for MethodBuilder, and you can find other examples of how to use reflection emit on the Using Reflection Emit page: public ...


12

When developing the math library for SlimDX, we found that, on pre-.NET 3.5 SP1 frameworks, using fields for the members of the math types (such as X, Y, Z for a Vector3) gave a disproportionate performance increase over properties. In other words, the difference was noticeable for small math functions which heavily accessed properties. This has since been ...


12

Opcodes.Ldsfld So, assuming you have created num1 somewhere like FieldBuilder num1 = ... before, you can load it onto the stack via generator.Emit(Opcodes.ldsfld, num1);


11

Mono.Cecil also allows you to remove the strong name from a given assembly and save it back as an unsigned assembly. Once you remove the strong name from the assembly, you can just modify the IL of your target method and use the assembly as you would any other assembly. Here's the link for removing the strong name with Cecil: ...


11

To dynamically create an assembly with an interface that has attributes: using System.Reflection; using System.Reflection.Emit; // Need the output the assembly to a specific directory string outputdir = "F:\\tmp\\"; string fname = "Hello.World.dll"; // Define the assembly name AssemblyName bAssemblyName = new AssemblyName(); bAssemblyName.Name = ...


11

EDIT again: This works structs now. There's a gorgeous way to do it in C# 4, but you'll have to write your own ILGenerator emit code for anything before that. They added an ExpressionType.Assign to the .NET Framework 4. This works in C# 4 (tested): public delegate void ByRefStructAction(ref SomeType instance, object value); private static ...


11

If you have access to .NET 3.5 (which your use of Func<T> suggests), you may find Expression easier than ILGenerator: class Foo { } static void Main() { Func<Foo> func = GetCtor<Foo>(); // cache this somewhere! Foo foo = func(); } static Func<T> GetCtor<T>() { Type type = typeof(T); Expression body = ...


11

The implementation of RuntimePropertyInfo (which is the concrete subclass of PropertyInfo for runtime types) implements GetValue and SetValue by invoking the getter and setter methods via reflection (MethodInfo.Invoke), whereas your generated delegate probably calls the methods directly. Therefore, the question boils down to: why is RuntimeMethodInfo.Invoke ...


10

If you're using Reflection.Emit, you really ought to grab a copy of the Reflection.Emit language add-in for Reflector. While not perfect, it should get you at least 95% of the way to any given emitted code.


10

Use PropertyInfo.GetValue/SetValue If you have performance problems cache the PropertyInfo object (don't repeatedly call GetProperty) If - and only if - the use of reflection is the performance bottleneck of your app (as seen in a profiler) use Delegate.CreateDelegate If - and really really only if - you are absolutely sure that reading/writing the values ...


10

Is ILGenerator.BeginExceptionBlock what you're after? The example in the docs suggests it's the right approach...


9

For this reason, .NET's sealed classes can have better method dispatching performance than their non-sealed counterparts. Unfortunately this is not the case. Callvirt does one other thing that makes it useful. When an object has a method called on it callvirt will check if the object exists, and if not throws a NullReferenceException. Call will simply ...


9

You can use MethodInfo.GetMethodBody().GetILAsByteArray(), modify that, and then plug it back into MethodBuilder.CreateMethodBody().


9

There is no representation of a boolean value on the evaluation stack. The bool, char, byte, ushort, uint, and their signed variants are all represented as a 4-byte signed integer (i4). True: ldc.i4.1 False: ldc.i4.0


9

Code that targets CodeDom tends to be easier to maintain, since you're generating C# code and not IL (more people can read C# than IL). Futhermore, if you get your CodeDom code wrong, you get a compiler error; if you generate invalid IL, you get a fatal exception or a crash. However, because CodeDom invokes the csc.exe compiler, it's a little slower to get ...


9

Define it where you define the type: moduleBuilder.DefineType("MyNamespace.MyTestInterface", TypeAttributes.Public | TypeAttributes.Interface, typeof(object));


9

If I take the following method: public static int Multiply(int a, int b) { return a * b; } compile it in Release mode and use it in your code, everything works fine. And if I inspect the il array, it contains 4 bytes that correspond exactly to the four instructions from Jon's answer (ldarg.0, ldarg.1, mul, ret). If I compile it in debug mode, the ...


9

arg.0 contains this and is required by ldfld string Test:s1 to push this.s1 onto the stack. .method public hidebysig instance void Run(string s2) cil managed { .maxstack 8 // maximum stack size 8 ldarg.1 // push argument s2 ldarg.0 ...


8

Your question isn't very specific. If you update it with more information, I'll flesh out this answer with additional detail. Here's an overview of the manual steps involved. Create an assembly with DefineDynamicAssembly Create a module with DefineDynamicModule Create the type with DefineType. Be sure to pass TypeAttributes.Interface to make your type ...



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