Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

It would be nice if you gave a reproducible example. I think you're looking for cc <- coef(summary(step1))[2,,drop=FALSE] as.data.frame(cc) Using accessors such as coef(summary(.)) rather than summary(.)$coefficients is both prettier and more robust (there is no guarantee that the internal structure of summary() will stay the same -- although ...


5

1) lm.fit Use the fact that vec(AXA') = (A ⊗ A ) vec(X) so: k <- ncol(A) AA1 <- kronecker(A, A)[, c(diag(k)) == 1] lm.fit(AA1, c(V)) Here is a self contained example: # test data set.seed(123) A <- as.matrix(BOD) u <- 1:2 V <- A %*% diag(u) %*% t(A) + rnorm(36) # solve k <- ncol(A) AA1 <- kronecker(A, A)[, c(diag(k)) == 1] fm1 ...


3

I know the question is answered, but as a new member I'd post a reply, by way of learning the ropes round stackoverflow. So here goes. Please bear with me. Just building on above two answers actually sort(apply(cbind(w, x, y, z), 2,function(v) sum((a - v) ^ 2)))[1] And following nicola's approach, sort(apply(cbind(w,x,y,z),2, function(xx) ...


3

You can use this code: sapply(data.frame(w, x, y, z), function(v) sum((a - v) ^ 2)) # w x y z # 95.39201 158.81291 186.37518 75.86112 The smallest sum of squared differences is obtained for z.


3

Spent a long time going through this; treated it as an "attention to detail exercise." def ols_gradient(target, features): def h(betas): error = target - np.dot(features, betas) return np.dot(error, features) return h Make sure to drop the learning rate to .0000001. Funny how the smallest mistakes are the hardest to find.


3

Note the warning Maybe you want aes(group = 1). All I've done is add group = 1 to aes for geom_smooth. ggplot(data.2) + geom_jitter(aes(value,Svolume, colour=variable),) + geom_smooth(aes(value,Svolume, colour=variable, group = 1), method=lm, se=FALSE) + facet_wrap(~variable, scales="free_x") + labs(x = "Variables", y = "Svolumes") Some ...


3

In mixed-effects models you have two types of coefficients (hence "mixed"): fixed and random. Both can be extracted from lmer/glmer objects using the dedicated functions. For example: lmer_obj = glmer(Y ~ X1 + X2 + (1|Subj), data = D, family = binomial) fixef(lmer_obj) ## returns fixed effects ranef(lmer_obj) ## returns random effects


2

Here is another option using lapply. dependents <- c('outcome1', 'outcome2') lst <- lapply(dependents, function(x) { fit <- lm(paste(x,'~', 'var1+var2+var3'), data=df) summary(lsmeans(fit, 'var1', data=df))}) Map(cbind, lst, outcome = seq_along(dependents))


2

There were a few typos and things, but I think this is what you want: # Examplified here with 2 outcome variables outcome1 <- c(2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16) outcome2 <- c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8) var1 <- c("a", "a", "a", "a", "b", "b", "b", "b") var2 <- c(10, 11, 12, 9, 14, 9, 5, 8) var3 <- c(100, 101, 120, 90, 140, 90, 50, 80) df <- ...


2

summary(step1)$coefficients is a matrix. When you take out the first element with [-1, drop=FALSE] it is converted to a vector, which is why you get 7 numbers instead of the row you want. > set.seed(123) > x <- rnorm(100) > y <- -1 + 0.2*x + rnorm(100) > step1 <- lm(y ~ x) > class(summary(step1)$coefficients) [1] "matrix" > ...


2

Renaming matrix columns is one option: sysuse census, clear generate constant = 1 capture matrix drop regsresults // erase previously existing matrix foreach depvar in marriage divorce { reg `depvar' popurban i.region constant, robust noconstant // regressions matrix result_matrix = e(b)\vecdiag(e(V)) // grab coeffs and their ...


2

You are fitting a second-order polynomial through 3 points, so naturally you get a perfect fit (R2=1). Your other errors seem to stem from your use of regular Python lists instead of NumPy arrays which support vectorized operations such as the one you want to carry out here: SST = sum((valeur_min - ybar)**2) Adding an extra data point and modifying your ...


1

Short answer here, perhaps more an idea than a solution. Have you tried scipy.optimize.curve_fit ? It would do the fitting, but you would still have to code yourself the lower-weightening of the old values before passing it through the absolute_sigma parameter.


1

You can use do on grouped data for this task, fitting the model in each group in do and putting the model residuals and fitted values into a data.frame. To add these to the original data, just include the . that represents the data going into do in the output data.frame. In your simple case, this would look like this: X %>% group_by(g) %>% ...


1

For the lm models you could try library(nlme) # lmList to do lm by group library(ggplot2) # fortify to get out the fitted/resid data do.call(rbind, lapply(lmList(y ~ x | g, data=X), fortify)) This gives you the residual and fitted data in ".resid" and ".fitted" columns as well as a bunch of other fit data. By default the rownames will be prefixed ...


1

When I ran your code, I got the message Traceback (most recent call last): File "test.py", line 26, in <module> plt.plot(T,y,"ro") File "/astromake/opt/casa/stable/lib/python2.7/site-packages/matplotlib/pyplot.py", line 2458, in plot ret = ax.plot(*args, **kwargs) File ...


1

There does appear to be a bug in the ridge:::predict.ridgeLinear code. Specifically, when they subset their model matrix, with only one row, they are loosing the proper structure of the matrix. You can fix it by writing your own version predict.ridgeLinear <- ridge:::predict.ridgeLinear body(predict.ridgeLinear)[[7]][[3]] <- quote(mm <- cbind(1, ...


1

To fit the model without a constant use lm(y~b*c -1,...). Setting a fixed constant can be done by specifying the offset and not fitting the constant or by subtracting the known constant from the dependent variable and fitting a model with no constant. set.seed(123) x <- rnorm(100) DF <- as.data.frame(cbind(x)) DF$y = 4 + (1.5*x) + rnorm(100, sd = 2) ...


1

I don't think you can when grouping by Country and Sex. You could just group by Country and add interactions with Sex: DF <- DF %>% group_by(Country) %>% do({ mod = lm(Value ~ Sex + Mean*Sex + X + Y, data = .) A <- predict(mod, .) data.frame(., A) }) or estimate your model in one go adding interactions with Sex and Country: mod ...


1

If you're using the glmnet package in R, the penalty.factor argument addresses this. From ?glmnet: penalty.factor Separate penalty factors can be applied to each coefficient. This is a number that multiplies lambda to allow differential shrinkage. Can be 0 for some variables, which implies no shrinkage, and that variable is always included in the ...


1

sklearn provides a simple way to do this. Building off an example posted here: #X is the independent variable (bivariate in this case) X = array([[0.44, 0.68], [0.99, 0.23]]) #vector is the dependent data vector = [109.85, 155.72] #predict is an independent variable for which we'd like to predict the value predict= [0.49, 0.18] #generate a model of ...


1

That is not a built-in feature. You can "add" it by wrapping the LogisticRegression class in your own class, and adding a threshold attribute which you use inside a custom predict() method. However, some cautions: The default threshold is actually 0. LogisticRegression.decision_function() returns a signed distance to the selected separation hyperplane. If ...


1

This question (how does the "add trendline" in Excel really works?) also puzzled me for a longer time, because in a research I need to be sure about an origin of my numbers. Because I havent found too much about this on internet, so I tryed several vays of manual R^2 (coefficient of determination) evaluation in order to obtain the same results as Excel. I ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible