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37

Are SVMs better than ANN with many classes? You are probably referring to the fact that SVMs are in essence, either either one-class or two-class classifiers. Indeed they are and there's no way to modify a SVM algorithm to classify more than two classes. The fundamental feature of a SVM is the separating maximum-margin hyperplane whose position is ...


20

The problem you are pursuing is intractable in the way you have defined it. It is usually a mistake to think that a neural network would "magically" learn a rich reprsentation of a problem. A good fact to keep in mind when deciding whether ANN is the right tool for a task is that it is an interpolation method. Think, whether you can frame your problem as ...


15

I can see that you are worried about how to train the ANN, but this project hides a complexity that you might not be aware of. Object/character recognition on computer games through image processing it's a highly challenging task (not say crazy for FPS and RPG games). I don't doubt of your skills and I'm also not saying it can't be done, but you can easily ...


11

Yes, this is the only difference. On-policy SARSA learns action values relative to the policy it follows, while off-policy Q-Learning does it relative to the greedy policy. Under some common conditions, they both converge to the real value function, but at different rates. Q-Learning tends to converge a little slower, but has the capabilitiy to continue ...


9

Seems like the heart of this project is exploring what is possible with an ANN, so I would suggest picking a game where you don't have to deal with image processing (which from other's answers on here, seems like a really difficult task in a real-time game). You could use the Starcraft API to build your bot, they give you access to all relevant game state. ...


9

Take a look at the 2009 RL-competition. One of the problem domains is a tetris game. There was a tetris problem the year before too. Here’s the 52-page final report from that year’s fifth-place finalist, which goes into a lot of detail about how the agent worked.


8

There are some research papers on the topic: Efficient Reinforcement Learning Through Evolving Neural Network Topologies (2002) Reinforcement Learning Using Neural Networks, with Applications to Motor Control Reinforcement Learning Neural Network To The Problem Of Autonomous Mobile Robot Obstacle Avoidance And some code: Code examples for neural ...


8

There are evolutionary methods that are explicitly aimed at solving the reinforcement learning problem. The subfield typically goes by the name of Learning Classifier Systems (LCS) or occasionally Genetics-Based Machine Learning (GBML). Aside from that, I'm not sure your question has a very well-defined answer. It basically boils down to "what is machine ...


6

From this, we know: The convergence of Q-learning holds using any exploration policy, and only requires that each state action pair (s,a) is executed infinitely often. The epsilon-greedy policy is a balance between exploration and exploitation, which both guarantees convergence and often good performance. But in practical problems, we often need some ...


6

If this is your first experiment with reinforcement learning I would recommend starting with something much simpler than this. You can start simple to get the hang of things and then move to a more complicated project like this one. I have trouble with POMDPs and I have been working in RL for quite a while now. Now I'll try to answer what questions I can. ...


6

I loved Doug's answer. I would like to add two comments. 1) Vladimir Vapnick also co-invented the VC dimension which is important in learning theory. 2) I think that SVMs were the best overall classifiers from 2000 to 2009, but after 2009, I am not sure. I think that neural nets have improved very significantly recently due to the work in Deep Learning ...


6

Recurrent Neural Networks, RNN for short (although beware that RNN is often used in the literature to designate Random Neural Networks, which effectively are a special case of Recurrent NN), come in very different "flavors" which causes them to exhibit various behaviors and characteristics. In general, however these many shades of behaviors and ...


5

I'm not an expert on the topic, but I'll take a crack at responding directly at your many questions [BTW, I should get multi +reps for each question!... Just kidding, if I was in "for the SO reps", I'd stay clear from posting which will get a grand total of 20 views with half of these visitors having an rough idea of the concepts at hand] 1) Q-Learning a ...


5

Yes, this is relatively standard. It was the approach taken by Tesauro in his program TDGammon 2.1 which trained an artificial neural network to play backgammon better than the best human players (after bootstrapping on 1.5 million games). There are many caveats, however: Artificial neural networks are notoriously difficult to use correctly. Have you ...


5

What you describe is called reinforcement learning. It could be applied to neural networks, but does not require them in general. The canonical textbook to read on the subject is Reinforcement Learning: An Introduction by Richard Sutton and Andrew Barto. The connection between neural networks and reinforcement learning is explored in a bit more detail in the ...


5

RL-Glue is somewhat of a standard int the reinforcement learning community. RL-Library is the part that implements standard algorithms. That said, the most common reinforcement algorithms are so simple that they don't call for any kind of library.


5

Connect Four is a solved game, meaning that there is a strategy that will always allow the player who goes first to win. You could try to do a machine learning approach, but it would pointless except as an exercise. You can read how Victor Allis used an expert system to find the winning strategy in his master's thesis (pdf).


4

Well the standard ML rubric for this sort of thing (i.e., creating a bot to play a video game) is Reinforcement Learning. This is a broad field comprised of a number of different techniques/algorithms; perhaps the one more relevant for your project is Q-Learning. One of the standard treatises in Reinforcement Learning is Reinforcement Learning: An ...


4

Gamma determines how much memory your algorithm has. If you set it to 0.0, then your algorithm will not update the value function Q at all. If you set it to 1.0, then the new experience will be given as much weight as all the previous experiences combined. The best values lie inbetween and have to be determined experimentally. Here is how it works: In ...


4

What you describe is nothing unusual. Reinforcement learning is a way of finding the value function of a Markov Decision Process. In an MDP, every state has its own set of actions. To proceed with reinforcement learning application, you have to clearly define what the states, actions, and rewards are in your problem.


4

TD deals with learning within the framework of a Markov Decision Process. That is, you begin in some state st, perform an action at, receive reward rt, and end up in another state — st+1. The initial state is called s0. The subscript is called time. A TD agent begins not knowing what rewards it will receive for what actions or what other states those ...


4

Clarifying the problem N=10 actors O=50 objects L=1K locations S=50 features As I understand it, you have a warehouse with N actors, O objects, L locations, and some walls. The goal is to make sure that each of the O objects ends up in any one of the L locations in the least amount of time. The action space consist of decisions on which actor ...


4

There is an assumption in the basic Reinforcement Learning framework that your state/action/reward sequence is a Markov Decision Process. That basically means that you do not need to remember any information about previous states from this episode to make decisions. But this is obviously not true for all problems. Sometimes you do need to remember some ...


4

Doesn't look like it, the major people who organized it last year are busy graduating from PhD. You could email the students who organized it last time to ask though: Shimon Whiteson, Brian Tanner, and Adam White Also, http://metaoptimize.com/qa is basically the stack overflow for the machine learning community, it's usually a better place for such ...


4

Single-ownership pointers are the harder to misuse, modulo the design of std::auto_ptr. You could consider using boost::scoped_ptr, which is safer yet (it can't transfer ownership though and can't be returned from a function). When it comes to containers, you could use a pointer container, but it's also fine to use e.g. std::vector without smart pointers if ...


4

My guess is that the code is CCL-dependent, so use CCL instead of CLISP or SBCL. You can download it from here: http://trac.clozure.com/openmcl


4

16 states x 7 actions is a very small problem. Rewards for other angles will help you learn faster, but can create odd behaviors later depending on your dynamics. If you don't have momentum you may decrease the number of states, which will speed up learning and reduce memory useage (which is already tiny). To find the optimal number of states, try ...


3

Q(K, A) does not just keep growing infinitely, due to the minus Q(S, A) term. This is more apparent if you rewrite the update rule to: Q(S, A) <-- Q(S, A)(1 - a) + a(R + maxQ(S', A')) This shows that Q(K, A) slowly moves towards its "actual" value of R + maxQ(S', A'). Q(K, A) only grows to approach that; not infinitely. When it stops growing (has ...


3

The MDP article you reference gives a good overview of value and policy iteration, but stops short of mentioning asynchronous dynamic programming. The fact is that you don't need to perform full isolated sweeps of the graph for the values to converge [1]; you can update the vertices one at a time in any order, given that you don't neglect any of them. That ...


3

Using a neural-network to store q-value is a good extension of table lookup. This makes it possible to use q-learning when the state space is continuous. input layer ...... |/ \ | \| output layer a1 a2 a3 0.1 0.2 0.9 Suppose you have 3 actions available. Above shows the outputs from the neural network ...



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