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50

You should not use reinterpret_cast. Casting some pointer from void* is not allowed using reinterpret_cast (5.2.10/7 since void is not an object type. IMHO that's a valid way to read it, even if some compilers do not diagnose it). reinterpret_cast can be used to cast between some unrelated pointer types when writing platform dependent code when necessary. ...


31

There are things that reinterpret_cast can do that no sequence of static_casts can do (all from C++03 5.2.10): A pointer can be explicitly converted to any integral type large enough to hold it. A value of integral type or enumeration type can be explicitly converted to a pointer. A pointer to a function can be explicitly converted to a pointer to a ...


30

It's a good assumption to start with. However, the optimizer may be restricted in what it can assume in the presence of a reinterpret_cast. Then, even though the cast itself has no associated instructions, the resulting code is slower. For instance, if you cast an int to a pointer, the optimizer likely will have no idea what that pointer could be pointing ...


28

You should use a reinterpret_cast, because that describes better what you're doing (completely ignoring type safety) This does actually not describe the effect of a reinterpret_cast. Rather, reinterpret_cast has a number of meanings, for all of which holds that “the mapping performed by reinterpret_cast is implementation-defined.” [5.2.10.3] However, ...


27

According to cppreference.com the following conversion is available only since C++11: An expression of integral, enumeration, pointer, or pointer-to-member type can be converted to its own type. The resulting value is the same as the value of expression. which may not be implemented in Visual Studio 2013 RC yet.


23

The C++ standard says (5.2.10.2) (emphasis mine): The reinterpret_cast operator shall not cast away constness (5.2.11). An expression of integral, enumeration, pointer, or pointer-to-member type can be explicitly converted to its own type; such a cast yields the value of its operand. So I'd say it's a bug.


22

For types for which such cast is permitted (e.g. if T1 is a POD-type and T2 is unsigned char), the approach with static_cast is well-defined by the Standard. On the other hand, reinterpret_cast is entirely implementation-defined - the only guarantee that you get for it is that you can cast a pointer type to any other pointer type and then back, and you'll ...


21

(In layman's terms) reinterpret_cast is used to interpret the bits of an object as another type in an implementation-defined manner. You don't want that: you want a conversion (from char to int). Use static_cast instead. (All possible uses of reinterpret_cast are listed in 5.2.10; this is not one of them.)


19

By assigning y to the value returned by the cast you're not really casting the value x, you're converting it. That is, y doesn't point to x and pretend that it points to a float. Conversion constructs a new value of type float and assigns it the value from x. There are several ways to do this conversion in C++, among them: int main() { int x = 42; ...


17

To expand upon @larsman's answer (which says that since you violated a constraint, the behavior is undefined), here's an actual C implementation where sizeof(int) == sizeof(void*), yet the code is not equivalent to printf( "%p", (void*)rand() ); The Motorola 68000 processor has 16 registers which are used for general computation, but they are not ...


17

First, it is legal to cast in C. §6.7.2.1/13: Within a structure object, the non-bit-field members and the units in which bit-fields reside have addresses that increase in the order in which they are declared. A pointer to a structure object, suitably converted, points to its initial member (or if that member is a bit-field, then to the unit in ...


14

Using static_cast is fine at the example but reinterpret_cast is not. Because reinterpret_cast is not convert vtable. No, the problem is that the reinterpret_cast is completely oblivious about the inheritance. It will simply return the same address unchanged1. But static_cast knows that you're performing a downcast: i.e. casting from a base class to a ...


14

cout << v[0] << endl; // prints some garbage Not garbage, but the character that the value in v[0] represents. cout << (void*)v[0] << endl; This "converts" the value in v[0] to a pointer (undefined behavior, since it wasn't a pointer to begin with), and prints the value of that pointer as a hex value. cout << (int)v[0] ...


13

Either cast is acceptable in that situation, so you are correct that static_cast is okay. When converting between two pointer types, it's possible that the specific memory address held in the pointer needs to change. That's where the two casts differ. static_cast will make the appropriate adjustment. reinterpret_cast will avoid changing the pointer's ...


13

In C++ reinterpret_cast can only perform a specific set of conversions, explicitly listed in the language specification. In short, reinterpret_cast can only perform pointer-to-pointer conversions and reference-to-reference conversions (plus pointer-to-integer and integer-to-pointer conversions). This is consistent with the intent expressed in the very name ...


12

Because that's not what reinterpret_cast is for. All the permitted conversions with reinterpret_cast involve pointers or references, with the exception that an integer or enum type can be reinterpret_cast to itself. This is all defined in the standard, [expr.reinterpret.cast]. I'm not certain what you're trying to achieve here, but if you want ...


12

C standard, 7.21.6.1, The fprintf function, states just p The argument shall be a pointer to void. By Appendix J.2, this is a constraint, and violating a constraint causes UB. (Below is my previous reasoning why this should be UB, which was too complicated.) That paragraph does not describe how the void* is retrieved from the ..., but the only way ...


12

There's no requirement that a Fred* and a void* have the same size and representation. (I've worked on machines where they didn't, although that was before my C++ days.) When you convert Fred* to void*, you get a new pointer, with a possibly different size and representation, but there is no information about the size and representation of the object the ...


12

In this case (converting object pointers), reinterpret_cast is identical to the two nested static_cast via void* 5.2.10 Reinterpret cast [expr.reinterpret.cast] 7 An object pointer can be explicitly converted to an object pointer of a different type.72 When a prvalue v of object pointer type is converted to the object pointer type “pointer to cv T”, ...


11

strlen works by iterating through the array that it assumes the passed const char* points at until it finds a char with value 0. This is the null-terminating character that is automatically added to the end of string literals. The bytes that make up the value representation of your double do not end with a null character. The strlen will just keep going past ...


11

reinterpret_cast is not a general cast. According to the C++03 spec section 5.2.10.1: Conversions that can be performed explicitly using reinterpret_cast are listed below. No other conversion can be performed explicitly using reinterpret_cast. And there is nothing listed that describes converting between integral and floating point types (or between ...


11

Can someone tell me why the reinterpret_cast should not work? AFAICS, the reinterpret_cast should work fine, but the assignment afterwards should cause an error. That's because a const GOK_UINT8* is a non-const pointer to const GOK_UINT8 objects, while a const pGOK_UINT8 is a const pointer to non-const objects. The former protects the object referred ...


11

Well, as the compiler warns you, you are violating the strict aliasing rule, which formally means that the results are undefined. You can eliminate the strict aliasing violation by using a function template for the increment: template<typename T> void advance_pointer_as(void*& p, int n = 1) { T* p_a(static_cast<T*>(p)); p_a += n; ...


11

You need reinterpret_cast to get a pointer with a hardcoded address (like here): int* pointer = reinterpret_cast<int*>( 0x1234 ); you might want to have such code to get to some memory-mapped device input-output port.


10

In &(*it); the * is overloaded to do what you logically mean: convert the iterator type to its pointed-to object. You can then safely take the address of this object. Whereas in reinterpret_cast<Thing*>(it); you are telling the compiler to literally reinterpret the it object as a pointer. But it might not be a pointer at all -- it might ...


10

A double**-based "array" is a completely different beast from an actually multidimensional array, i.e. double[N][M]. It has a completely different layout and stores different information, so you cannot possibly do what you want without storing any additional information. The way a double**-based "array" works is with a two-level structure, where the first ...


9

That paper first claims: In contrast, a language is weakly-typed if type-confusion can occur silently (undetected), and eventually cause errors that are difficult to localize. And then claims: Also, C and C++ are considered weakly typed since, due to type-casting, one can interpret a field of a structure that was an integer as a pointer. This ...


9

You might want to overload operator ++ for your enum if you really want to iterate its values: Foo& operator++( Foo& f ) { using UT = std::underlying_type< Foo >::type; f = static_cast< Foo >( static_cast< UT >( f ) + 1 ); return f; } and use for (Foo foo = Foo::First; foo != Foo::Last; ++foo) { ... } To ...


9

They are completely different types see standard: 3.9.1 Fundamental types [basic.fundamental] 1 Objects declared as characters char) shall be large enough to store any member of the implementation's basic character set. If a character from this set is stored in a character object, the integral value of that ...


9

Which is more costly? IME, the one invoking Undefined Behavior is always more costly in the end. If you want to port this to some new platform, or another compiler, or a new version of your compiler, such code might blow up. Or it might make some other, innocent looking code blow up. Or it might do so only on Sundays, when your customers cannot call ...



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