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704

If Machine A is a Windows box, you can use Plink (part of PuTTY) with the -m parameter, and it will execute the local script on the remote server. plink root@MachineB -m local_script.sh If Machine A is a Unix-based system, you can use: ssh root@MachineB 'bash -s' < local_script.sh You shouldn't have to copy the script to the remote server to run it.


305

This is an old question, and Jason's answer works fine, but I would like to add this: ssh user@host <<'ENDSSH' #commands to run on remote host ENDSSH This can also be used with su and commands which require user input. (note the ' escaped heredoc) Edit: Since this answer keeps getting bits of traffic, i would add even more info to this wonderful ...


149

Also, don't forget to escape variables if you want to pick them up from the destination host. This has caught me out in the past. For example: user@host> ssh user2@host2 "echo \$HOME" prints out /home/user2 while user@host> ssh user2@host2 "echo $HOME" prints out /home/user Another example: user@host> ssh user2@host2 "echo hello world | ...


70

This is an extension to YarekT's answer to combine inline remote commands with passing ENV variables from the local machine to the remote host so you can parameterize your scripts on the remote side: ssh user@host ARG1=$ARG1 ARG2=$ARG2 'bash -s' <<'ENDSSH' # commands to run on remote host echo $ARG1 $ARG2 ENDSSH I found this exceptionally ...


53

<hostA_shell_prompt>$ ssh user@hostB "ls -la" That will prompt you for password, unless you have copied your hostA user's public key to the authorized_keys file on the home of user .ssh's directory. That will allow for passwordless authentication (if accepted as an auth method on the ssh server's configuration)


30

When logging into a shell, the remote host assumes that the connection is done by a human user. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect that they have control over the standard in on the client. That is to say, the user is giving input on a terminal through the keyboard. If the remote host detects that the user is not human (because the input is not a terminal ...


19

The problem was indeed my login script, although not to do with requiring a terminal (I'd suspected that and tested with the -t and -T options). The problem was that my .bashrc was running an exec (in this case to zsh - because our system doesn't allow chsh to zsh). The offending line: test -f /usr/bin/zsh && exec /usr/bin/zsh Solved by first ...


18

I've started using Fabric for more sophisticated operations. Fabric requires Python and a couple of other dependencies, but only on the client machine. The server need only be a ssh server. I find this tool to be much more powerful than shell scripts handed off to SSH, and well worth the trouble of getting set up (particularly if you enjoy programming in ...


9

The Pyjamas project has a compiler called pyjs which turns Python code into Javascript.


8

Obviously, the only way to test whether a string is a valid regular expression is by compiling it (which is done when you call any of the matching functions), so what you're doing makes a lot of sense. The null-byte protection you have added is actually not necessary since 5.4, because there are already checks made in the leader, the middle and the ending. ...


6

Assuming you mean you want to do this automatically from a "local" machine, without manually logging into the "remote" machine, you should look into a TCL extension known as Expect, it is designed precisely for this sort of situation. It's home page below looks kind of crappy but don't let that dissuade you; I've also provided a link to a script for logging-...


6

nosklo's answer is wrong: pyxpcomext for firefox adds language="python" support to script tags. yes it's a whopping 10mb plugin, but that's life. i think it's best if you refer to http://wiki.python.org/moin/WebBrowserProgramming because that is where all known documented links between python and web browser technology are recorded: you can take your pick, ...


6

From: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa384372(v=vs.85).aspx The defult memory limit on remote shells is 150MB MaxMemoryPerShellMB Specifies the maximum amount of memory allocated per shell, including the shell's child processes. The default is 150 MB.


5

I put together a table comparing many Python-In-Browser technologies not long ago: http://stromberg.dnsalias.org/~strombrg/pybrowser/python-browser.html


5

REST is now in fashion for web services. There is no real reason to get down to TCP/IP layer for something which from your description does not require super performance or response times. LSL HTTP support is quite good so you should not have any problems. Of course it is not ideal to get the output of your programs back in real-time - for that you would ...


4

I am tryin to run a remote script something like ssh user@remote sh script.unx script.unx on remote machine, runs several commands, but it says commando not found, it looks like remote script doesnt read enviroment variables any idea? try running ssh user@remote sh ./script.unx


4

LSL's external communication options are limited to three specific options. The official LSL wiki provides more detailed information on each option. Raw HTTP: requests must be initiated by LSL script XmlHTTP: requests must be initiated by external service Email: full two-way communication, but with enforced sleep timers.


4

On my travels, I came across Skulpt, a project which seems to offer Python directly in the browser without plugins. It's licensed under MIT. Skulpt Homepage Skulpt @ Github


4

It is more straightforward than you think: host1 $ ssh user@host2 ls > remote-output.txt Enter passphrase for key '/home/user/.ssh/id_rsa': host1 $ ls remote-output.txt host1 $ To do it for multiple hosts, I suggest using ssh-agent and setting up autorization keys: $ ssh-agent bash $ ssh-add Enter passphrase for /home/user/.ssh/id_rsa: $ for h in ...


3

Your problem most likely lies in your shell startup or shell logout scripts. Without knowing what's in there, it's hard to guess the actual problem.


3

http://repl.it/ - Python interpreter in JavaScript running on client side. There are many other languages too. Source is available under MIT license, which is awesome.


3

Following Tim Post's answer: Setup public keys and then you can do the following: #!/bin/bash ssh user@host "chmod 755 /go && /go"


3

You mean client-side? Sure you can! But you need to have python installed on the client first. The linked book describes that in order to use client-side Active Scripting, you can test it with the a simple html file. <html><body> <script language='Python'>alert("Hello, Python!")</script> </body></html> In the old ...


3

No, you can't. Modern browsers only run javascript or plugins. You can develop your own python plugin and convince people to download and run it, but I guess that falls to the "not inside the browser" category.


3

You need to have the script on the remote server, and if you have ssh key authentication you can do the following ssh user@thatServer.toruncommand.com 'command to run'


3

You can create a sub-shell: cat script.py | ssh user@address.com "(cd ..; python -)" Or a temporary file: cat script.py | ssh user@address.com "tee >/tmp/tmp.py; cd ..; python /tmp/tmp.py; rm /tmp/tmp.py"


3

if you have powershell V3 or higher you can use the using prefix to "transmit" the local vars to remote host : Invoke-Command -ComputerName RMTMACHINE -credential $cred -ScriptBlock {$using:Patcher $using:ver $using:inst} for olders versions look at the -argumentlist parameter of invoke-command


2

LSL's llHTTPRequest function and corresponding http_response event are definitely your best bet. Contrary to the assumption posed in your question, using http does not necessitate using "html forms". The POST (or PUT) payload can contain data organized however you want. A REST interface is a good way to do the kind of machine-to-machine http communication ...


2

I would tend to agree with Ilya. The Best you might be able to pull if you want the script to be very responsive is to have your server side code call back to the object once the server is made aware of it using the XML-RPC. The main wiki for Second Life is pretty good for sample code, etc. XML-RPC


2

By accident I was listening to Hanselminutes where he mentioned about Gestalt project. This is a solution to integrate a languages as IronRuby and IronPython in browser via Silverlight. So I think the answer is no if you don't have any special plugins.



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