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31

Using the [ref] modifier SomeMethod( [ref] $a ); Notable blog entries http://geekswithblogs.net/Lance/archive/2009/01/14/pass-by-reference-parameters-in-powershell.aspx http://weblogs.asp.net/soever/archive/2009/03/26/powershell-return-values-from-a-function-through-reference-parameters.aspx


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$explorer = gwmi Win32_Process -computerName computerName -filter "Name='explorer.exe' and SessionID=0" $explorer.GetOwner() | select user,domain


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You can start from this article: RegistryKey.OpenRemoteBaseKey. But you user account should be allowed to operate with registry on this remote machine! And impersonation is not the best way to resolve your task. LogonUser creates new security context on that machine where it is called. This means that user with permissions to access remote registry also ...


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You might want to check the PSRemoteRegistry PowerShell Module, and its version for PowerShell 3.0 (with x86.x64 support, http://psrr.codeplex.com/).


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Assuming you can ping APPS-EUAUTO1(and it resolves to correct IP) and firewall is off.. make sure Remote Registry service is running on your APPS-EUAUTO1


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Use this as example: $reg = [Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey]::OpenRemoteBaseKey('LocalMachine', $computername ) $regKey= $reg.OpenSubKey("SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Run",$true) $regKey.SetValue("New_Valuename_String","New_Valuedata",[Microsoft.Win32.RegistryValueKind]::String) To create a new key you need use powershell ...


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What exactly do you see in the HOSTNAME reported in the error message "Failed to read remote registry key from host XXX". Is XXX the machine name of the local machine or FQDN of the machine or is it pointing to a totally different machine ??? If it is pointing to the local machine name or the FQDN of the local machine, then try putting an entry in the ...


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You cannot read HKEY_CURRENT_USER via remote registry, for the simple reason that there is no "current user" from the perspective of the remote registry service. For example, would it be: The registry key you would see if you were logged on? (but you are not!) The registry key of the current logged-on user (What if there is none? What if more than one?) ...


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It was bacuse of different user priviliges when running from web service and when runing from CMD.


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The Wow6432 registry entry indicates that you're running a 64-bit version of Windows. The OS uses this key to present a separate view of HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE for 32-bit applications that run on a 64-bit version of Windows. When a 32-bit application queries a value under the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\\ subkey, the application reads from the ...


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This is subject to the standard TCP/IP connection time-outs. The same ones you see when trying to visit a web site that's off line with your browser. Yes, you can change them by editing the registry. You can make them longer. Not shorter. Perhaps you can ping it first if this often fails.


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I think it must be an environmental issue. I just tried this from 32-bit Windows XP Professional to 64-bit Windows 7 Ultimate and it worked fine. Occasionally on a thread or two a call to RegQueryValueEx would fail with either ERROR_BUSY or ERROR_NOT_READY, but I never experienced any long delays. In case anybody else tries to test this, I ran into a ...


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This is not really an answer, but a suggestion. Even though you are only querying the registry (not writing), I'm wondering if you are producing some kind of dead-lock with the multiple threads. Lacking a Windows development or testing environment, take this suggestion for what its worth: perhaps you could use mutexes around the registry calls... that may ...


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Can you show the code which you are writing? Have you opened the key? Many people do get problems since they have not opened it? This is just a guess, hope it works key = _winreg.OpenKey(_winreg.HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, r'SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Enum\Root')



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