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7

Perhaps something like this: let isVowel = function | 'a' | 'e' | 'i' | 'o' | 'u' | 'y' | 'å' | 'ä' | 'ö' | 'A' | 'E' | 'I' | 'O' | 'U' | 'Y' | 'Å' | 'Ä' | 'Ö' -> true | _ -> false let lollify s = [| for c in s do if isVowel c then yield c else yield c; yield 'o';yield c |] |> System.String [<EntryPoint>] let main argv = ...


6

Strings are immutable so any method you call on them doesn't change the current string but instead returns a new one. You need to assign the result of the replace call to your string: foreach (ContactsModel c in listOfContacts) { c.ContactNotes = c.ContactNotes.Replace("*?*!", Environment.NewLine); }


4

one way not using numpy a = list(map(lambda x:x+10 if x < 0 else x, a))


3

You can just use what String already provides, a method to get each character and a method to replace a specifc character with another: public String getPattern (Set<Character> guesses, String word) { for (int i=0; i<word.length(); ++i) { char c = word.charAt(i); if (!guesses.contains(c)) word = word.replace(c, ...


2

The problem here is that you generate a regular expression from some user input here: Regex regex = new Regex(t.Substring(t.IndexOf("<td"), length)); The user input is treated as a regular expression and therefore if it contains specific syntax for regular expressions, they will be interpreted such and therefore you will not find the text you are ...


2

You can execute code inside a replacement with the e modifier (see perlretut): my $txt = " this is a statement //this is comment //this is a line of comment more statements //more comments "; my @comments; $txt =~ s{(//.*\n)} {push(@comments, $1);"foo"}eg; print $_ foreach (@comments); Other way: Since you are looking for inline comments, you can also ...


2

You could make a a numpy array: a = np.array(a) and then simply do: a[a<0] += 10


2

I'd tackle it a bit differently - a while loop to read a filehandle line by line, and 'grab' all the comment lines out of it. Something like this: #!/usr/bin/perl use warnings; use strict; my @comments; #iterate stdin or filename specified on command line while ( <> ) { #replace anything starting with // with foo_nn #where nn is current ...


2

It can be done with list comprehension without using NumPy. Assuming you have list of numbers a: >>> a = [2, 4, -8, 5, -2] >>> [number if number >= 0 else number + 10 for number in a] [2, 4, 2, 5, 8]


2

You can certainly put your search strings into a collection, loop over the collection, and then do a search-and-replace for each step of the loop. But that's also a loop over the string for every item in your search list. Instead, you should use an NSScanner, moving through the string as matches are found. For longer source strings, you will find this far ...


2

Often the best way to debug code is to remove it. Less code means less you have to get right, and less places there are for bugs to lurk. Accordingly, try this: while (input.matches(".*\\*.*\\*.*")) { String starred = input.replaceAll("[^*]*[*]([^*]+).*", "$1"); input = input.replace("*" + starred +"*", starred.toUpperCase()); } This works by: ...


2

String.collect (string >> function | vowel when "aeiouyåäöAEIOUYÅÄÖ".Contains vowel -> vowel | consonant -> consonant + "o" + consonant ) String.collect applies a function to each char of a string.


2

How about building a regex String from the Set of characters, and using that as a param to the String.replaceAll method to return the filtered String? Set<Character> letters = new HashSet<>(); letters.add('m'); letters.add('k'); letters.add('p'); String filter = "[^("; for (Character letter : letters) { filter += ...


2

Building on your regex, you can replace . which match any character within XML comment, to [^*] which will match any character except literal char * : (?s)<!--[^*]*?-->


2

You need to replace with the backreference to the whole match: <a href="$&">$&</a> Or <a href="$0">$0</a> Here, the $0 and $& "insert" the text that is matched by the whole regular expression, not just by some capturing groups.


2

Another solution: var lines = new string[] { "22 The cats of India", "4 Royal Highness", "562 Eating Potatoes", "42 Biscuits in the 2nd fridge", "2564 Niagara Falls at 2 PM" }; foreach (var line in lines) { var newLine = string.Join(" ", line.Split(' ').Skip(1)); }


2

If you want to make sure you only match digits at the beginning of the string, you can use the following regex: ^\d+\p{Zs} See demo Declare it like: public static readonly Regex rx = new Regex(@"^\d+\p{Zs}", RegexOptions.Compiled); The ^\d+\p{Zs} regex means: one or more digits at the start of the string followed with 1 whitespace. And then use it ...


1

Like this using the alternative quote operator: test := q'[a','b','c]'; Or: SELECT REPLACE(q'[a','b','c]', 'a','b') FROM DUAL; More info here. Here's another way to prove it in Sqlplus: SQL> declare test varchar2(15) := q'[a','b','c]'; begin dbms_output.put_line(REPLACE(test, 'a', 'b')); end; / b','b','c PL/SQL procedure ...


1

gc C:\temp\NagiosExport.csv | % {$_.replace('.xyz.xxx.asd.qwerty.com','')} | Out-File C:\temp\nagexportnew.csv


1

I think you should use * quantifier after [ ] to make the preceding spaces optional. So the expression will be ^{[ ]*}{(SELECT|GROUP BY|ORDER BY)} {[#_a-z0-5]+} and replace with same pattern you are using. \1\2\n\1 \3


1

A couple of small changes to your regex gave the correct result for your example: {^:b*}{(SELECT|GROUP BY|ORDER BY)} {.+} :b matches space or tab. * matches zero or more occurrences (so keywords at the start of lines will be matched). I didn't understand the purpose of the restriction on the column list names so replaced it with a generic .+, which seems ...


1

Matching a character only if followed by a set of other words is best done using a regular expression: import re for line in file1: line = re.sub(r" (?=adj|verb|-)", "\t", line) file2.write(line)


1

Iterate over every line of the text, and if replacement is successful, store the comment: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; my $txt = <<END; # define text //first comment this is a statement //second comment //third comment more statements //fourth comment END my @comments = (); my $i = 0; foreach (split qq(\n), $txt) ...


1

If you allow the use of numpy: import numpy as np f = [ i.strip() for i in open('C:/Users/simon/Desktop/file.txt', 'r') ] a = [] for line in f: line = line.split() a.append(float(line[0])) a = np.array(a) print a a[a<0] = a[a<0] + 10 print a That will give you: [ 2. 4. -8. 5. -2.] [ 2. 4. 2. 5. 8.]


1

HTML <img src="category.image.jpeg"> <img src="category.image.png"> <img src="category.image.gif"> JS var $img = $('img'), baseStr = 'category.image', ext = ['.jpeg', '.png'], aryMatchStr = $.map(ext, function(item) { return baseStr + item; }); $.map($img, function(item, index) { var $item = $(item), src = ...


1

try this NOTE: this is with quotes if(src.match('/category/image.jgep') || src.match( '/category/image.png')) { self.attr('src', src.replace("/category/","/categories/")); }


1

Here's the regex you need /category(\/image\.(?:jpe?g|png))/gi Regex101 Demo: https://regex101.com/r/eN6gW1/1 Example var regex = /category(\/image\.(?:jpe?g|png))/gi; var self = $(this); var src = self.attr('src'); self.attr('src', src.replace(regex, 'categories$1')); JSFiddle Demo: https://jsfiddle.net/qjyukz4c/4/


1

.match(/category/image.jgep) is not a valid syntax to use RegEx with String#match and will throw syntax error. To check if the string contains .jpeg or .png images, you can use /category\/image\.(?:jpeg|png)$/ Use RegExp#test instead of String#match to check if the string follows the pattern. Code: var regex = /category\/image\.(?:jpeg|png)$/i; if ...


1

I believe what you are wanting is a regex that matches any png or jpeg file in the category directory, in which case this would be the regex you would want to use: /\/category\/.*\.(jpeg|png)/ And in code: var self = $(this); var src = self.attr('src'); if (src.match(/\/category\/.*\.(jpeg|png)/)) { self.attr('src', ...


1

If your keys have no spaces: output = [dct[i] if i in dct else i for i in text.split()] ' '.join(output) You should use dct instead of dict so it doesn't collide with the built in function dict() This makes use of a dictionary comprehension, and a ternary operator to filter the data. If your keys do have spaces, you are correct: for k,v in ...



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