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The replaceAll method on String takes a regular expression as an argument, and in regular expressions some characters have special meanings, such as the parentheses in your expression. Simply use the replace method instead, which takes literal strings: String newline = line.replace("stream.Values(strmatch('Test',stream.Components,'exact'))", "New Data"); ...


2

Your regex checks for non-alphabets this includes comma and spaces. For this case you can try String extractedString = fullString .replaceAll("\\d", "").trim(); or String extractedString = fullString .replaceAll("[0-9]", "").trim(); You can check your regex online here. http://www.regexplanet.com/advanced/java/index.html


2

You can simply call the String.replaceAll method and specify that those characters must be replaced by the empty String: clean = clean.replaceAll("(?:--|[\\[\\]{}()+/\\\\])", ""); But if you need to do this many times, it's worth creating a Pattern object so that the regex does not have to be compiled repeatedly: private static final Pattern ...


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What you're doing there is removing everything that is either a period, or is not a number (which includes periods). Try "[^\\d\\.]"


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The below regex would store the version number in the first group. Replace the whole string with the first group. :\s*(.*$) Your java string would be ":\\s*(.*$)" DEMO


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Matcher class is not thread-safe, because its objects has internal state which can be modified concurrently if used in multiple threads. The answer on your question depends on what exactly do you mean saying thread-(un)safe. First point - String class objects are immutable in Java, methods that returns substring, replaces something in the original string, ...


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Yes, this method is thread-safe; it doesn't modify any shared data. It's not safe to use the same Matcher instance in multiple threads, but it's fine to use different matchers in different threads at the same time. Even if the replaceAll method uses a Matcher internally, it'll be a different instance for each call, which means different instances even if ...


1

You're passing an immutable object by reference. The replaceAll method on the argument does not impact on the argument, it creates a new String instance. To test this, you can do as follows: String newValue = rawValue.replaceAll(...); System.out.println(rawvalue); // old value


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You may try: String clean = "This \\ is / an example. This -- is + an [(example)]."; return clean.replaceAll("[(--)+\\[\\]{}()\\\\/]", "").trim());


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You should be able to remove everything in one fell swoop. Just put everything in a character class ([]). [\[\]+{}()\\/-] As in: clean = clean.replaceAll("[\\[\\]+{}()\\\\/-]", "");


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One, you do not escape using /, you do it using \. Two, if you need to use \, you have to double escape it to get it into the regular expression. Three, you can combine all the expressions into one regex. Four, you can chain calls to replaceAll(). public class Replace { public static void main(String[] args) { String clean = "This \\ is / ...



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