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Your on the right track, I have used var mtc = new MultitenantContainer(container.Resolve<ITenantIdentificationStrategy>(), container); DependencyResolver.SetResolver(new AutofacDependencyResolver(mtc)); The identification strategy would be based on the logged in user. With defaults for when they aren't logged in. public class ...


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You need to make both methods share the same database connection and transaction. How you do that is your choice. Your code looks like an anti-pattern. You're supposed to use one ObjectContext per unit-of-work where the UOW scope should encompass everything you need to do. Often, the scope is an HTTP request. If you do that the problem goes away. But you ...


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The answer that is working for me is utilizing Foreign Keys properly and not populating navigation properties when adding the Entity in question. When I moved to setting the Foreign key not the Navigation property all is working as expected. This is because the navigation property is seen as a new entry even though it already exists in the database. This is ...


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Elaborating on the answer by @sunil and my comment on it, I created a class specifically for handling stored procedures. As I mentioned in my comment, if you are expecting a different model back from the SP than that specified in your Repository, you have problems. Also, if you only want to execute an SP, then you're breaking the ISP. Below is my solution. ...


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Multiple databases means connection per dbContext. In both articles DbContext is created like this : public EFDbContext() : base("name=DbConnectionString") { } and then in the Repos ctor : public Repository(EFDbContext context) { this.context = context; } What you need is another ctor in EFDvContext like this : ...


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Use the power of the database whenever you can. That's what an ORM would try to do -- get as much filtering, sorting, etc. as possible inside the SQL query. I see little value in having both Repositories and DAO's. They both abstract out the persistent storage. If you want to go without an ORM, you'll typically handle the database query generation part in ...


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You are actually asking quite a number of questions here so I'll try to keep the answers as terse as possible :) Repositories return an Aggregate Root or an Entity. Some are quite adamant that repositories only return ARs and that is fine and will always suffice. There are two types of repositories (as nicely descibed by Vaughn Vernon in his Implementing ...


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You are casting the list itself to a TTag. This cannot be done. Cast the individual elements in the list instead. public IList<TTag> FindAllTTag() { using(var dbContext = new PAMEntities()) { var res = (from c in dbContext.TypeCollectionSets join t in dbContext.TypeCollectionSet_TTag on c.Id ...


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Reproducing the solution the asker found themselves. The problem occurs when you use one of the overloads of Returns which takes in a Func delegate. That Func must either take zero parameters (i.e. a Func<TResult> where TResult is known at compile-time to be IQueryable<DomainObject> in your case) or take the exact list of parameter that matches ...


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The repository pattern has it's pros and cons. From my relatively recent adoption of the pattern it allows for a much easier testing experience - especially when inheritance and polymorphism are leveraged. Below is an excerpt of a near catch-all repository contract I use. interface EntityRepository { /** * @param $id * @return array */ ...


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As for me, ActiveRecord is pretty good in small projects, but for medium or huge apps it is hard to maintain. pros of Yii ActiveRecord Using of Yii AR can speed up coding. All AR models and controllers can be one-click generated by gii. AR is extremely popular. Almost all developers are familiar with this pattern. New team members dive into the project ...


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There is no "correct" answer to this question, it is primarily opinion-based. You can read about my opinion in the following project wiki: https://github.com/danludwig/tripod/wiki/Why-Tripod%3F https://github.com/danludwig/tripod/wiki/Dependency-and-Control-Inversion https://github.com/danludwig/tripod/wiki/Tripod-101 ...


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The third one... and then some. Your application structure could look like this (each in different projects): Data storage layer (e.g. SQL database) ORM (e.g. NHibernate or Entity Framework) Domain (including abstract repositories and entities) Service layer (and optionally business) MVC application (which has it's own models relating to the entities) ...


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The short answer - it depends. If it's a fairly complex or sizable application, I like to create a service layer project with the repositories as dependencies. If it's a small application, I'll put the logic in the controller. In my opinion, if it takes more time and effort to create the service layer than it would be to create the application (i.e. one or ...


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A more appropriate metaphor for a repository might be that it is the illusion of an in-memory collection of objects. Take your basic collection type from any OO language. If you get an element from that collection and modify the element, you typically don't have to save it back to the collection afterwards, because it has never ceased being in the ...


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When your model looks like this... public class Navigation_Functions { ... public ICollection<Navigation_FunctionController> Navigation_FunctionController { get; set; } } public class Navigation_FunctionController { ... public ICollection <Navigation_Functions> Navigation_Functions { get; set; } } ...so without a ...


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If I was doing this myself, I would not inject the repository into your models. Instead, on the Address model, I would have a personId field, or if you are tracking more than one person per address, a collection of personIds. Doing this, you could have a method on your address repository named GetByPersonId(int personId) which would then fetch the ...


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I've used this solution: public int Type { get; set; } [NotMapped] public LogType UserLogType { get { return (LogType)Type; } set { Type = (int)value; } }


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You have two classes with the same name in the same namespace. Use different namespaces so you can use the same class names. I usually use \Models to locate my models classes. At the top of each model file: namespace Models; In your controller or any part of your app: \Models\Role::first(); Note that changing the namespace on your model will require ...


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If any one is interested, this is what I implemented and it seemed to work, however I ended up giving up on it as realised that this would pretty much be allowing "Dirty Reads" of the data which had a knock on effect on the rest of the system and we decided that the performance hit of multiple saves was more desirable than reworking big bits of the system - ...


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I hope I understood the problem correctly, this is what I usually do: var repo = new ItemRepository(); Int32 index = 0; Int32 localIndex = 0; while (index < arr.Length) { repo.MyItems.Add(new Item(arr[index])); index++; localIndex++; if (localIndex == 1000) { ...


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You cannot map a 1:1 relationship this way. The only way EF supports 1:1 mapping is with a shared primary key, which means both tables have to have the same key, and one has to be a foreign key to the other. It's unfortunate, but it's a holdover from the time when EF did not support unique constraints, and you cannot have a 1:1 mapping without a shared ...


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I am actually in disagreement that EF is a correct example of a "Repository Pattern". It is a typed Data Access Layer and an exposed LINQ implementation. Please note that if one fully endorses EF as "the business domain" then the above does not hold; however, I use EF - as poorly as it does - with Schema First, in which EF is not the strict business domain. ...


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Usually, if you have an ORM or some sort of change tracker, you don't need save() methods on your repositories since modifications will be flushed at the application level, when the UnitOfWork is committed. If 10 notifications were flagged, chances are the ORM will translate that into 10 update statements, but it's never been a problem to me. Maybe you can ...


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It might be difficult to test your bll if if you can't mock the objects within the dal, so using interfaces and di would be useful in my opinion. You also have the option of swapping out your dal for a different dal if you loosely couple it. The interfaces for the dal could be in the bll. As a general rule all the dependencies should flow to your bll, not ...


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What you want to use is a queryBuilder: http://doctrine-orm.readthedocs.org/en/latest/reference/query-builder.html when you do ->findAll() on a repository, it goes straight for the database and fetches all(shortly speaking). To manipulate what you get from the database, you shoud do: $repo->createQueryBuilder() ->select('column1,column2') ...



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