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39

In Python, you can do: test = float("inf") And then: test > 1 test > 10000 test > x Will always be true. Unless of course, as pointed out, x is also infinity.


34

This question is actually a very interesting one which mathematicians have devoted a fair bit of thought to. You can read about it in this article, which is a fascinating and accessible read. Briefly, a guy named Tibor Rado set out to find some really big, but still well-defined, numbers by defining a sequence called the Busy Beaver numbers. He defined ...


29

Bits are not numbers. You, as a programmer, give them the meaning you want, possibly numbers. Now, I decide that 1 represents "the biggest number ever thought by a human plus one".


21

There is no direct way (i.e. using printf or another standard library function) to print it. You will have to write your own function. /* This code has an obvious bug and another non-obvious one :) */ void printbits(unsigned char v) { for (; v; v >>= 1) putchar('0' + (v & 1)); }


21

A fixed point number has a specific number of bits (or digits) reserved for the integer part (the part to the left of the decimal point) and a specific number of bits reserved for the fractional part (the part to the right of the decimal point). No matter how large or small your number is, it will always use the same number of bits for each portion. For ...


19

Errr this is a five year old? How about something along the lines of: "I'd love to tell you but the number is so big and would take so long to say, I'd die before I finished telling you".


18

It isn't an official document, but this recently came up on Google+. The comments also have a good discussion with some detailed explanation.


17

// wait to see for(;;) { printf("9"); }


17

Decimal.GetBits for the information you want. Basically it's a 96 bit integer as the mantissa, plus a sign bit, plus an exponent to say how many decimal places to shift it to the right. So to represent 3.261 you'd have a mantissa of 3261, a sign bit of 0 (i.e. positive), and an exponent of 3. Note that decimal isn't normalized (deliberately) so you can ...


16

You represent programs using mutually recursive algebraic data types, and to parse programs you use parsing combinators. There are a million flavors; you will find three helpful tutorial papers on the schedule for my class for Monday, March 23, 2009. They are Graham Hutton and Erik Meijer, Functional Pearl: Monadic parsing in Haskell (1998) Graham ...


15

I would like to cite a site, http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-time.html The international standard notation for the time of day is hh:mm:ss where hh is the number of complete hours that have passed since midnight (00-24), mm is the number of complete minutes that have passed since the start of the hour (00-59), and ss is the number of complete seconds ...


15

I don't know exactly what you are doing, but float("inf") gives you a float Infinity, which is greater than any other number.


14

Based on dirkgently's answer, but fixing his two bugs, and always printing a fixed number of digits: void printbits(unsigned char v) { int i; // for C89 compatability for(i = 7; i >= 0; i--) putchar('0' + ((v >> i) & 1)); }


14

bool is a built-in basic type in C#. Any underlying representation would be an implementation detail. The C# 4.0 Language Specification states in section 4.1.8: The bool type represents boolean logical quantities. The possible values of type bool are true and false. No standard conversions exist between bool and other types. In particular, the bool ...


14

I'm not familiar with the Python/Lisp functions you listed, but I think you want either dput or dump. x <- data.frame(1:10) dput(x) dump("x", file="clipboard")


13

A recursive data type is fine for this. For example, given the language: expr ::= var | "true" | "false" | "if" expr "then" expr "else" expr | "(" expr ")" an example expression in this language would be: if true then x else (if false then y else true) Your Haskell data type would look something like this: data Expr = Var ...


12

The __repr__ should preferably be a string that could be used to recreate the object, for example if you use eval on it - see the docs here. This isn't an exact science, as it can depend on how the user of your module imported it, for example. I would have the __str__ return the binary string, and the __repr__ return Classname(binary_string), or whatever ...


12

roughly 2^AVAILABLE_MEMORY_IN_BITS EDIT: The above is for actually storing a number and treats all media (RAM, HD, cloud etc.) as memory. Subtracting the OS footprint (measured in KB) doesn't make "roughly" less accurate... If you want to "represent" a number in a meaningful way, then you probably want to go with what the CPU provides: unsigned 32 bit ...


12

What are you trying to do? This is a set of bytes: BYTES = 'abera\xc8\x9bie' It's a set of bytes which represents a utf-8 encoding of the string "aberație". You decode the bytes to get your unicode string: >>> BYTES 'abera\xc8\x9bie' >>> print BYTES aberaÈ›ie >>> abberation = BYTES.decode('utf-8') >>> abberation ...


10

Yes, there is at least one way of doing this.


9

There are two basic options: An explicit function delta :: Q -> X -> Q (or [Q] as appropriate) as Sven Hager suggests. A map delta :: Map (Q, X) Q e.g. using Data.Map, or if your states/alphabet can be indexed by ascending numbers Data.Array or Data.Vector. Note that these two approaches are essentially equivalent, one can convert from the map ...


9

Which of the casts is allowing me to convert an int* to an unsigned char*? That C-style cast in this case is the same as reinterpret_cast<unsigned char*>. Can I cast any T* type like this? Yes and no. The yes part: You can safely cast any pointer type to a char* or unsigned char* (with the appropriate const and/or volatile qualifiers). The ...


8

Canonicalisation is the process by which you take an input, such as a file name, or a string, and turn it into a standard representation. For example if your web application only allows access to files under C:\websites\mydomain then typically any input referring to filenames is canonicalised to be a physical, direct path, rather than one which uses ...


8

If you have a type where 99% of the values could be represented in one fast, powerfull type, and only 1% in a very heavy type, (say int vs. BigInteger) How to represent it?? BigInteger implementations typically do exactly that; they keep everything in ints or longs until something overflows, and only then do they go to the heavierweight implementation. ...


8

You can print to a string using the output string stream, and then replace "e" with "*10^". ostringstream ss; ss << scientific << 123456789.87654321; string s = ss.str(); s.replace(s.find("e"), 1, "*10^"); cout << s << endl; This snippet produces 1.234568*10^+08


8

The most recent example I can find is the UNISYS 2200 series, based on UNIVAC, with ones-complement arithmetic. The various models were produced between 1986 and 1997 but the OS was still in active development as late as 2013. They also had a C compiler, as seen here. It seems likely that they may still be in use today.


8

Seems the simplest approach here would be to create a generator that yields all the filler values for eternity, then chain this with yielding the values in list2: def inf_gen(f): while True: yield f() Note that inf_gen(f) is actually equivalent to iter(f, None), given that f never returns. iter with two arguments calls the first argument until ...


8

__repr__ is intended to be the literal representation of the object. Note that if you define __repr__, you don't have to define __str__, if you want them both to return the same thing. __repr__ is __str__'s fallback. class test: def __init__(self): self._x = 2 def __repr__(self): return str(self._x) def __call__(self): ...


7

You should define __repr__ and __str__ separately: class Hex(int): def __repr__(self): return "Hex(0x%x)" % self def __str__(self): return "0x%x" % self The __repr__ function should (if possible) provide Python text that can be eval()uated to reconstruct the original object. On the other hand, __str__ can just return a human readable ...



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