Hot answers tagged

20

You're almost certainly missing something. A lot of things, probably. Don't worry, it's ok. Even if you remembered everything and covered all the bases stakeholders aren't going to be able to give you very good, clear requirements without any point of reference. The best way to do this sort of thing is to get what you can from them now, then take that ...


20

See obligatory comic below... In general, I try and get a feel for the business model my customer/client is trying to emulate with the application they want built. Are we building a glorified forms processor? Are we retrieving data from multiple sources in a single application to save time? Are we performing some kind of integration? Once the general ...


12

Steve Yegge talks fun but there is money to be made in working out what other people's requirements are so i'd take his article with a pinch of salt. Requirements gathering is incredibly tough because of the manner in which communication works. Its a four step process that is lossy in each step. I have an idea in my head I transform this into words and ...


8

Wow, where to start? First, there is a set of knowledge someone should have to do analysis on some projects, but it really depends on what you are building for who. In other words, it makes a big difference if you are modifying an enterprise application for a Fortune 100 corporation, building an iPhone app, or adding functionality to a personal webpage. ...


6

First of all gather the requirements before you start coding. You can begin the design while you are gathering them depending on your project life cicle but you shouldn't ever start coding without them. Requirements are a set of well written documents that protect both the client and yourself. Never forget that. If no requirement is present then it was not ...


3

According to Steve Yegge that's the wrong question to ask. If you're gathering requirement it's already too late, your project is doomed.


3

You can never ask too many or "stupid" questions. The more questions you ask, the more answers you receive.


2

No, I'd say it's not a common practice. Fundamentally, writing the specs is a task that's part of the acceptance criteria of your story. Some options: Put a column in your backlog for "Spec Review" so that you can ensure that the story passes through spec review as part of moving from "committed" to "done". Have a task (or several tasks) for writing the ...


2

High-level discussions about purpose, scope, limitations of operating environment, size, etc Audition a single paragraph description of the system, hammer it out Mock up UI Formalize known requirements Now iterate between 3 and 4 with more and more functional prototypes and more specs with more details. Write tests as you go. Do this until you have ...


1

Before you go talking to the stakeholders/users/anyone be sure you will be able to put down the gathered information in a usefull and days-lasting way. Use a sound-recorder if it is OK with the other person and the information is bulky. If you heard something important and you need some reasonable time to write it down, you have two choices: ask the other ...


1

Gathering Business Requirements Are Bullshit - Steve Yegge


1

There are some great ideas here already. Here are some requirements gathering principles that I always like to keep in mind: Know the difference between the user and the customer. The business owners that approve the shiny project are usually the customers. However, a devastating mistake is the tendency to confuse them as the user. The customer is usually ...


1

A user story is intentionally kept simple and abstract. The reason is that it is considered to be an 'invitation to a conversation'. That means as the team gets close to working on the story they speak with the Product Owner to start fleshing out the detail of the story. This may happen in backlog refinement or it may happen as a part of the sprint planning ...


1

I would suggest you to read Roger-Pressman's Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach


1

Like most stages of the software development process its iteration works best. First find out who your users are -- the XYZ dept, Then find out where they fit into the organisation -- part of Z division, Then find out what they do in general terms -- manage cash Then in specific terms -- collect cash from tills, and check for till fraud. Then you can ...


1

read the agile manifesto - working software is the only measurement for the success of a software project get familiar with agile software practices - study Scrum , lean programming , xp etc - this will save you tremendous amount of time not only for the requirements gathering but also for the entire software development lifecycle keep regular discussions ...


1

I've been using mind mapping (like a work breakdown structure) to help gather requirements and define the unknowns (the #1 project killer). Start at a high level and work your way down. You need to work with the sponsors, users and development team to ensure you get all the angles and don't miss anything. You can't be expected to know the entire scope of ...



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