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40

Questions like this remind me of a quote a friend of mine had in college 4 years spent in AI research will really make you question your atheism


31

The 100 ms threshold was established over 30 yrs ago. See: Card, S. K., Robertson, G. G., and Mackinlay, J. D. (1991). The information visualizer: An information workspace. Proc. ACM CHI'91 Conf. (New Orleans, LA, 28 April-2 May), 181-188. Miller, R. B. (1968). Response time in man-computer conversational transactions. Proc. AFIPS Fall Joint Computer ...


29

State of the art — yes, so far as I know all algorithms more or less take the same shape as Huet's (I follow theory of logic programming, although my expertise is tangential) provided you need full higher-order matching: subproblems such as higher-order matching (unification where one term is closed), and Dale Miller's pattern calculus, are decidable. ...


27

I find that http://ajaxian.com/ has a lot of useful information about javascript, ajax, and so on.


26

One optimization I'd love to see in GHC is supercompilation. That seems unlikely in the near-future of GHC, though, because it's whole-program optimization, and GHC is very focused on module-at-a-time compilation. Basically, supercompilation is executing as much of a program as possible at compile time. It naturally subsumes inlining, deforestation, ...


21

My answer to this will be disappointing, but still: no The reason for this is simple: Mr Resig's implementation of merge (or "extend" as it's called for objects) in jQuery is doing a loop, just like the one in your question. You can look at it here. And I dare say that if John Resig hasn't found a clever build-in way to do it, then the mere mortals of ...


18

In the spirit of "teach you to fish" rather than "give you a fish", you really need to find out who is doing work in your area. The gold standard for publishing cutting edge graphics research is the annual SIGGRAPH conference -- there are two now, one in North America, one in Asia, both are published as editions of the ACM's journal Transactions on Graphics ...


17

It's extremely difficult. The environment both you and Stefano Borini describe is very accurate. I think there are three key factors which propagate the situation. Short-term thinking Lack of formal training and experience Continuous turnover of grad students/postdocs to shoulder the brunt of new development Short-term thinking. There are a few reasons ...


16

An example of higher-order unification (really second-order matching) is: f 3 == 3 + 3, where == is modulo alpha, beta, and eta-conversion (but not assigning any meaning to "+"). There are four solutions: \ x -> x + x \ x -> x + 3 \ x -> 3 + x \ x -> 3 + 3 In contrast, first-order unification/matching would give no solution. HOU is very ...


16

Several reviewers asked me to compare C++ to other languages. This I have decided against doing. Thereby, I have reaffirmed a long-standing and strongly held view: Language comparisons are rarely meaningful and even less often fair. A good comparison of major programming languages requires more effort than most people are willing to spend, experience in a ...


15

I would use RIM OS 4.5 and higher. Why? list of all BlackBerry models Highest RIM OS versions available for each model 4.7.1 96xx Tour 4.7 95xx Storm 4.6.1 89xx Curve (Javelin) 4.6 90xx Bold 4.5 88xx World Edition 87xx Electron 83xx Curve 81xx Pearl list of latest RIM OS available for each device Models ...


15

I believe Tom DeMarco wrote that one shouldn't work more that 8 hours (actually, I even think he wrote something less, like 7h30 or 7h). I can't remember if it was in Peopleware, Slack, The Deadline or somewhere else. (EDIT2: Found some references about the above statement that I'm pasting below) In the Shorter hours in software article (Feb 22, 2005), we ...


14

Some Examples of Practical Use of Machine Learning Online Store Suggestions (like Amazon) Providing Targeted Ads (like Google AdSense) Grouping Similar News Stories (like Google News) An interesting book was recently written on this subject: Programming Collective Intelligence: Building Smart Web 2.0 Applications


14

Heres my opinions: GUI is horribly inefficient compared to CLI. I can accomplish much more using only keyboard than I can when the mouse is involved, unless I'm editing images. 3D desktops are generally not that useful. At least not yet. Anything where I have to move around to find things isn't very useful as it slows me down. Most other 3D interfaces are ...


14

DDD is not bound to a specific technology or a "supporting framework" for that matter. It's more about a process to develop good software and at the core of it lies object-oriented-modelling. Every language and environment that support s OOP is therefore suited to DDD. Nonetheless, tooling can play a supportive role to build your Domain Infrastructure. ...


13

What I remember learning was that any latency of more than 1/10th of a second (100ms) for the appearance of letters after typing them begins to negatively impact productivity (you instinctively slow down, less sure you have typed correctly, for example), but that below that level of latency productivity is essentially flat. Given that description, it's ...


12

Microsoft Research: Realizing quality improvement through test driven development: results and experiences of four industrial teams


12

StudiesOfTestDrivenDevelopment has a summary and more links.


12

Try this >>> import itertools >>> a=['1','2','3'] >>> b=['bc','b'] >>> c=['#'] >>> print [ "".join(res) for res in itertools.product(a,b,c) ] ['1bc#', '1b#', '2bc#', '2b#', '3bc#', '3b#']


10

Interface metaphors will remain 2D until we have inputs and displays that aren't 2D. As for "Minority Report"-style interfaces, I cringed really hard when I saw those "wave your hands in the air" interface scenes in that movie because I knew that people would latch onto that as some kind of wave of the future. That kind of interface is horrible for most ...


10

I noticed QuirksMode is missing. PPK is the source for Cross-Browser Programming Issues.


10

Such tools exist. They are the subject of a discipline called Genetic Programming. How you evaluate their success depends on the scope of their application. They have been extremely successful (orders of magnitude more efficient than humans) to design optimal programs for the management of industrial process, automated medical diagnosis, or integrated ...


10

As I've started putting everything into a single master BibTeX database (with BibDesk), I've been having similar problems. My system is more verbose than yours, and a little more ad-hoc. I write something like <first-author> <year> - <unique> I don't like using -1, -2 for papers because of the likelihood of very many authors with the ...


10

In Python, Django. It combines Python's readability with an expressive template system and a object oriented database access layer. Plus, the documentation is good and there is even an online book. Django automatically creates an admin site in which all database objects can be editted, though theviews can be customized. Can't think of an example as usually ...


10

The inline keyword is basically useless. It is a suggestion only. The compiler is free to ignore it and refuse to inline such a function, and it is also free to inline a function declared without the inline keyword. If you are really interested in doing a test of function call overhead, you should check the resultant assembly to ensure that the function ...


9

There have been several studies showing that a strict adherence to a consistent visual style helps experienced programmers keep more of the local problem in memory without having to memorize the individual elements of the problem. Consistent Coding Style Aids Chunking It has to do with how the human memory works. It is called chunking. For example, it is a ...



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