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From the Java docs: The baseName argument should be a fully qualified class name. However, for compatibility with earlier versions, Sun's Java SE Runtime Environments do not verify this, and so it is possible to access PropertyResourceBundles by specifying a path name (using "/") instead of a fully qualified class name (using "."). The second form will ...


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The jasper jar will only work if it is located in the file system, in the original file system location relative the other SICStus-files it depends on. This is so that it can find and load the SICStus JNI-library etc. Packaging the jasper jar file is therefore unlikely to work. If at all possible I would recommend against using Jasper. It is often better to ...


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When using Maven, properties files should be located inside src/main/resources not in src/main/java (see here) So, for instance, if you have the following definition in your faces-config.xml (for using the msgs variable in your facelet pages) : <resource-bundle> <base-name>i18n.PanneauPrincipal</base-name> ...


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The stack trace shows that the class is in the package learningjava4. And you're telling us that the bundle class/files are in the same package. So the bundle base name is learningjava4.Message, not Message.


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Your problem is that the java.util.ResourceBundle that comes with the JVM does a ServiceLoader.loadInstalled(ResourceBundleControlProvider.class) to obtain a list of providers in the static initializer, and uses the thus obtained list ever after.


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Well, I figured out the error myself. I was appending the fileName to the directory location File file = new File("resource/"+fileName); which was wrong. All I had to do was to first get the present working directory name using `System.getProperties("user.dir")` //this gives me the path of my current directory and passing only the directory name ...


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Get Jar file path. Get Parent folder of that file. Use that path in InputStreamPath with your properties file name. Properties prop = new Properties(); try { File jarPath=new File(YourClassNameInJar.class.getProtectionDomain().getCodeSource().getLocation().getPath()); String propertiesPath=jarPath.getParentFile().getAbsolutePath(); ...


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This is exactly what Iam looking for, see my post JSF 2 External resource bundle ResourceBundle bundle = ResourceBundle.getBundle("properties.common",facesContext.getViewRoot().getLocale()); externalContext.getRequestMap().put("prop", bundle); thanks all...



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