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109

I just hit this same exception in a WPF project. The issue occurred within an assembly that we recently moved to another namespace (ProblemAssembly.Support to ProblemAssembly.Controls). The exception was happening when trying to access resources from a second resource file that exists in the assembly. Turns out the additional resource file did not ...


44

I solved the problem like this: Right click on your ResourceFile Change the "Build Action" property Compile to "Embedded Resource" Then build and run It works perfectly.


15

Couple things. First off, objects are not reference counted; reference counting schemes have the circular reference problem, whereby two objects refer to each other but are otherwise inaccessible, and thereby leak. .NET uses a mark-and-sweep approach which does not use ref counts. Second, though the suggestion to use a weak reference is not terrible, it's ...


13

Second param "createIfNotExist" of the method GetResourceSet has to be true, that tells ResourceManager to load the ResourceSet if not yet loaded. ResourceSet rs = _resources.GetResourceSet(culture, true, false);


11

Use a weak_ptr. That will solve your problem. You won't need to free them as they will be automatically freed. Use a lock on the weak_ptr to get an actual shared_ptr. The use_count will also give you the current number of references.


8

To load .resx into ResourceManager you need specify namespace var rm = new ResourceManager("Namespace.ResxName", Assembly.GetAssembly()); or you can get ResourceManager for free if set Access Modifier inside Managed Resource Editor to Internal or Public, after that VS will generate ResxName.Designer.cs var rm = ResxName.ResourceManager;


8

You don't need to use the ResourceManager explicitly. Have a look here: http://geekswithblogs.net/mapfel/archive/2008/11/01/126465.aspx To learn how to change the culture to use during runtime, see the second comment in the link: switch (comboBox1.Text) { case "neutral": Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = new CultureInfo(""); break; ...


8

In the end, you cannot force anyone to listen. Ask at microsoft, apple or any open source library developer, they all know that song. A comment in the right words and places is your best bet. Avoid creating your own smart pointer class, it hinders composition and reduces readability. As a last resort, try looking in boost, or any framework your code already ...


7

It sounds to me that you could just use WeakReference from the resource manager. The GC will do the rest. You'll need to do a little casting, but it will be simple, and will work. class Manager { Dictionary<string, WeakReference> refs = new Dictionary<string, WeakReference>(); public object this[string key] { get { ...


7

I changed the name of SiteResources.en-US.resx to SiteResources.resx and now everything works just fine. Seems theer must be one invariant resource.


7

I have a different solution to make this work. When I tried sharing the resource.resx file with another project, I got this problem. This is how I solved it. I don't think editing the resource.designer.cs file is a good idea, as this is autogenerated. So I didn't edit resource.designer.cs. Delete the second project's Properties/Resources.resx file Add ...


6

The quick and dirty way to check what string you need it to look at the generates .resources files. Your .resources are generated in the resources projects obj/Debug directory. (if not right click on .resx file in solution exploere and hit 'Run Custom Tool' to generate the .resources files) Navagitate into this directory and have a look at the filenames. ...


5

I guess you're mixing up a few things here. There are a few kinds of using resource files, one of which is using .resx files. These files get localized automatically, based on the value of Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture. The default .resx file gets compiled into the assembly it is part of (for example your main executable), while the localized ...


5

Auto-generated files with access to each individual string are much easier to use - set "Custom tool" for RESX file to PublicResXFileCodeGenerator. Code would look like: using MyProject.Resources; ... localizedText = Resources.SomeReasonableName; Side notes: having multiple RESX files along with auto-generated IDs have additional benefit of ...


5

The GetString method of a ResourceManager object properly handles the traversing of resource files to locate the correct Value for a given key based on a culture. The base/neutral/default resource file can be obtained using the CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, which gives you all the possible keys for the resource file (assuming you setup your resource files ...


5

You'll need to specify hostname:port Yes, it has to be set on all the nodes, not just the ResourceManager node (You'll be fine just copying the same hadoop's conf dir to all of your nodes). If you need some minimal working configs to get started, take a look here: toster.ru/q/57046#answer_208326


5

Destroying the old state before constructing the new state is avoided in C++ as much as possible, because one cannot provide the strong exception guarantee that way: "The operation succeeds, or it throws an exception without changing anything". Thus, the standard library does not have such (I cannot even name a framework adding it). Naive and wrong ...


4

Smart pointers like shared_ptr and unique_ptr are a good tools when you have owning pointers. But for non-owning pointers, i.e. observing pointers, using a raw pointer is just fine. In your design, I think the resource manager is the only "owner" of the resources, so you could simply have some form of smart pointer inside the resource manager. For example, ...


4

I have been thinking about the same thing and I think I have an answer for you. It depends on what you need to do with it. Neither is necessarily more "correct". Read on if you want the details of how I came to my conclusion or scroll down to the tl;dr section. As you said, it would appear (externally) less cumbersome to access the singleton to have the ...


4

Each call to GetObject will read the image from the assembly and load it into a Bitmap object. Calling it many times will create significant overhead; you should store the images.


4

This usage is safe, in that whatever the shared_ptr<> passed in through the reference will have it's refcount reduced (assuming that the shared_ptr<> returned from seeker->second->Copy() isn't a shared_ptr<> to the same object) and therefore the object it will be pointing to might be deleted. Specifically, you aren't creating a ...


4

If your code-beside looks like this: public partial class _Login : BasePage { /* ... */ } Then you would get the Type object for it with typeof(_Login). To get the type dynamically, you can find it recursively: Type GetCodeBehindType() { return getCodeBehindTypeRecursive(this.GetType()); } Type getCodeBehindTypeRecursive(Type t) { var baseType = ...


4

Here is what was going on. I had an assembly with several translation resource files. These were all embedded resources. When I compiled the assembly it was putting the default English inside its .dll. As for the other languages it was creating folders, fr, da, de, etc. with the languages in. I had to move all these as well if I wanted them to be picked up ...


3

I figured it out (thanks to more scouring on the interweb). I was running code from unit tests, and apperently MSTest doesn't "deploy" the satellite assemblies. If I go into the Test Settings and turn off "Deployment", everything works as expected. Ugh!


3

I did some primitive profiling (using MiniProfiler) of the difference between using a cached manager (I used reflection to find the static cached manager for each resource type) and using a new manager for each key access. The results suggested that the new manager took about 45 times as long, which suggests to me that there is a real performance benefit to ...


3

Well, there's no reason to use the ResourceManager directly (some exceptions to that will apply), because if you use generated code from the resx-Files all it does is the following: public static string MyResourceName { get { return ResourceManager.GetString("MyResourceName", resourceCulture); } } This is great, since you get Compile-Time ...


3

shared_ptr are made to be owning. If you want a non-owning pointer at some part of your prgram use weak_ptr like so: std::shared_ptr<Object> sp(new Object); std::weak_ptr<Object>(sp);


3

I would simplify this a little, make one group for OLTP, if they have the same requirements. Only make a new group when that new group has different requirements than the others in terms of priority. Also make sure that when an OLTP user has started a long running heavy duty process, that this session is switched to the batch group, or not started at all. ...


3

Unfortunatley, the code Lance posted does not work. I have an updated version. However This cannot be used with a global public function, as I wanted it to work. It still has to be included in every file to be used. As such it is not really useful for a swc // ActionScript file import flash.events.Event; /** * Convenience function to return a localized ...


3

OK, I figured this out .. I am getting the .resx file because it is truly embedded into the main assembly. The other files are getting built into separate dlls for each language, I then need to copy them into the same folder that I build my aggregate container from, my resource manager then sees all languages.



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