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ok, not really an answer. i have ZERO idea as to why resttemplate.exchange fails with anything but the default RestfulController code but i was able to steal from restful controller and get what i wanted, which was control and the ability to debug the methods such as save... this is what i stole from super.... @Override Object save() { def instance = ...


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One of the reasons the REST paradigm was invented was because expirience with other remoting technologies (RMI, CORBA, SOAP) shows us that often, the proxy-based approach creates more problems than it solves. Theoretically, a proxy makes the fact that a function call is remote transparent to its users, so they can use the function exactly the same way as if ...


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Try adding the @RequestBody annotation to your test123 method: public DTO test123(@RequestBody DTO dto) { System.out.println(dto.getPhone()); // empty return dto; }


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considering that you are keeping all endpoints as a constant in a file, you should use place holders in url. In your case one URL endpoint would be http://localhost:8080/test?key1={0}&anotherParam={1} and while you do restTemplate.getForObject("http://localhost:8080/test", Result.class, "keyVal","anotherKeyVal"); since last parameter is of type ...


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Instead of using getForObject method to get BufferedImage, using exchange method to get byte array back. Images that have bad PNG headers now display in the browser. //Set HttpHeaders object List<MediaType> acceptableMediaTypes = new ArrayList<>(); acceptableMediaTypes.add(MediaType.IMAGE_PNG); HttpHeaders headers = new HttpHeaders(); ...


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I've been using rest template with JSONObjects as follow: // create request body JSONObject request = new JSONObject(); request.put("username", name); request.put("password", password); // set headers HttpHeaders headers = new HttpHeaders(); headers.setContentType(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON); HttpEntity<String> entity = new ...


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The Multipart File Upload worked after following code modification to Upload using RestTemplate LinkedMultiValueMap<String, Object> map = new LinkedMultiValueMap<>(); map.add("file", new ClassPathResource(file)); HttpHeaders headers = new HttpHeaders(); headers.setContentType(MediaType.MULTIPART_FORM_DATA); ...


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Use MY class to import java.io.BufferedReader; import java.io.IOException; import java.io.InputStreamReader; import java.net.UnknownHostException; import java.util.Map; import org.apache.http.HttpResponse; import org.apache.http.client.ClientProtocolException; import org.apache.http.client.HttpClient; import org.apache.http.client.methods.HttpPost; import ...


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In case 3 the FormHttpMessageConverter is used to convert MultiValueMap objects for sending in HTTP requests. Unfortunately, default FormHttpMessageConverter does not support conversion of entities to JSON. Thus, You have to add some JSON converter (e.g. MappingJackson2HttpMessageConverter) to FormHttpMessageConverter manually. Try to use this code: ...


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As an alternative to the solution presented by nilesh, you could also use spring class DefaultResponseErrorHandler. You also need to ovveride its hasError(HttpStatus) method so it does not throw exception on non-successful result. restTemplate.setErrorHandler(new DefaultResponseErrorHandler(){ protected boolean hasError(HttpStatus statusCode) { ...


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More based on the feeling, but this is the error you would get if you missed to declare a bean in the context configuration, so try adding <bean id="multipartResolver" class="org.springframework.web.multipart.commons.CommonsMultipartResolver"> <property name="maxUploadSize" value="10000000"/> </bean>


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I would like to create a DatabaseAccessService interface and implement it. Something like this @Service public class DatabaseAccessServiceImpl implements DatabaseAccessService { @Autowired private RestTemplate restTemplate; public void storeData(Data data){ ... restTemplate.postForObject(...) ... } } From ...


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RestTemplate restTemplate=new RestTemplate(); restTemplate.getMessageConverters().add(new MappingJackson2HttpMessageConverter()); HttpHeaders headers = new HttpHeaders(); headers.add(key,keyValue); HttpEntity entity = new HttpEntity(headers); ResponseEntity<Pojo> response=restTemplate.exchange(url,HttpMethod.GET,entity,Pojo.class); ...


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Assuming RestTemplate is configured to use HttpClient 4.x, you can read up on HttpClient's logging documentation here. The loggers are different than those specified in the other answers. The logging configuration for HttpClient 3.x is available here.


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You can use @JsonProperty annotation to override the variable name. @JsonProperty("phone") public String PHONE;


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Slightly different approach: MultiValueMap<String, String> headers = new LinkedMultiValueMap<String, String>(); headers.add("HeaderName", "value"); headers.add("Content-Type", "application/json"); RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate(); restTemplate.getMessageConverters().add(new MappingJackson2HttpMessageConverter()); ...


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Yes, It is possible, if use MultiValueMap headers instead of HttpHeaders Example: MultiValueMap<String, String> headers = new LinkedMultiValueMap<String, String>(); headers.add("Authorization", "Basic " + base64Creds); headers.add("Content-Type", "application/json"); RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate(); ...


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Spring Source Blog Post Objects passed to and returned from the methods getForObject(), postForLocation(), and put() and are converted to HTTP requests and from HTTP responses by HttpMessageConverters. What i think is you need to write your own convertor in order to get response as jasperprint


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Using RestTemplate class is very easy. Here is a good overview. RestTemplate rest = new RestTemplate(); String response; response = rest.getForObject("http://www.google.com", String.class); Object postData = null; response = rest.postForObject("http://yourdomain.com/example", postData, String.class);


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For me this worked Object[] forNow = template.getForObject("URL", Object[].class); searchList= Arrays.asList(forNow); Where Object is the class you want


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RESTTemplate is quite deficient in this area IMO. There's a good blog post here about how you could possibly extract the response body when you've received an error: http://springinpractice.com/2013/10/07/handling-json-error-object-responses-with-springs-resttemplate As of today there is an outstanding JIRA request that the template provides the ...


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You can use them as private variables in class as : @Context private HttpServletRequest request; @Context private HttpServletResponse response; OR @POST @Path("/myPostCall") public String myPostCall(..., @Context HttpServletRequest request, @Context HttpServletResponse response) throws Exception{ //do some stuff }


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Check this site. jsonschema2pojo. This will conver your json schemas to Java class. It works for both Jackson and Gson.


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First, you'll need a CSV parsing library such as SuperCSV or OpenCSV. Second you can add a HttpMessageConverter to Spring to convert csv input to java objects. http://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/current/javadoc-api/org/springframework/http/converter/HttpMessageConverter.html Having that set up, you'll be able to getForObject and get java objects directly.


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The java-based configuration instead of xml worked for me. FileAppender<ILoggingEvent> myAppender = new FileAppender<ILoggingEvent>(); LoggerContext loggerContext=(LoggerContext)LoggerFactory.getILoggerFactory(); loggerContext.reset(); PatternLayoutEncoder layout=new PatternLayoutEncoder(); layout.setContext(loggerContext); ...


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Could you please try this: restTemplate.getMessageConverters().add(new StringHttpMessageConverter()); String postParams = "\"" + id + "\""; String postResp = restTemplate.postForObject("findRecordById",postParams, String.class);


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i faced similar problem and solved it using resttemplate.exchange method. The steps are put your authentication details in RestRequestHeaderInfo which should be inside HttpEntity> pass this entity into the exchange method like below: response = restTemplate.exchange(url, HttpMethod.GET, request, Response.class); If response is in json format like in my ...


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As far as I am aware, RestTemplate's getForEntity() is not an appropriate way to get an InputStream. It's a convenience for converting to and from entity classes, so presumably that's where your problem lies. Since you are used to HttpInputMessage, why don't you use HttpInputMessage.getBody() on the client side as well? It gets you a nice InputStream, which ...


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Check how Spring MVC handles large files upload with org.springframework.web.multipart.commons.CommonsMultipartResolver. It has a 'maxInMemorySize' that can help control the memory requirements. See this thread for using a multipart resolver with the REST template Sending Multipart File as POST parameters with RestTemplate requests


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Using Gson https://code.google.com/p/google-gson/ . String result = getResponseFromServer(String url); //restful Gson gson = new Gson(); String[][] str = gson.fromJson(result, String[][].class);


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Try the following approach without needing a custom handler. The idea is to get the response as a string from the HttpStatusCodeException, and then you can convert it to your object. For the conversion I used the Jackson's ObjectMapper: try { restTemplate.postForObject(url, pojoInstance, responseClass); } catch ...


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You might have to add the content-type and accept headers to your request. Mapping the response to LoginResponse can be done directly like this LoginResponse lResponse = response.getBody(); or If you are using restTemplate.postForObject(), the reponse will be in the form of LoginResponse


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It looks like you are using Logback. It is highly configurable, with possibility of log only a certain level of messages (only warnings or only errors) and the possibility to log to console (default, to a file, ...). You should read the logback manual but here are some clues Logback reads its configuration from a file logback.xml at the root of classpath ...



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