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I think this is better: @Override public DataResponse executeSynchronous(DataKey key) { Task task = new Task(key, restTemplate); return task.call(); } It performs the same job, is clear, shorter, and has no overhead. Notice that his also cleans up the duplicate Exception handling you currently have. If the timeout is a must, an option is to ...


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From what I can tell, you're reusing the same RestTemplate object repeatedly, but each Task is performing this line: restTemplate.setRequestFactory(clientHttpRequestFactory());. This seems like it can have race conditions, e.g. one Task can set the RequestFactory that another Task will then accidentally use. Otherwise, it seems like you're using ...


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Sometimes it is not possible to interrupt thread especially when thread performs blocking operations on Socket. So instead of cancelling the task when it timeouts, you should rather set timeouts on http connection. Unfortunately timeousts are set per Connection Factory and RestTemplate, thus each request must use it's own RestTemplate. You can create new ...


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For synchronous call, executing in a separate thread is definitely not a good idea. You are incurring extra costs and resources for a Thread along with the cost of context switch of threads in this case. If there are lots of synchronous calls then you will be unnecessarily blocking the threads for asynchronous calls as your executor is of fixed size ...


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Thanks to @Blaise Doughan, I found the solution in his link: http://blog.bdoughan.com/2010/08/jaxb-namespaces.html The problem was I did not specify the name space, which I thought is part of the element name.


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I don't know why this is the way it is, but the error was that I had to receive the @RequestBody as TblGps[] Array and not as single object! Although i've fetched and received the same object before and received the result as single object, ...and then I posted it back to the server, and received it as array of objects ... ist it wired? Does anybody has ...


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Yes the issue was that my client was not sending the character set . Notice i changed the header where I am passing Content-Type My new code :- MultiValueMap<String, String> headers = new LinkedMultiValueMap<String, String>(); headers.add("Content-Type", MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON_VALUE + ";charset=UTF-8"); //Note Content-Type as ...


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I'm guessing the server doesn't know how to interpret what you're sending. Have you tried MediaType mediaType = new MediaType( "application" , "json" , Charset.forName( "UTF-8" ) ); headers.add( "Content-Type", mediaType ); Cheers,


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It appears that a call to a RestTemplate cannot be interrupted or canceled. Even if the "kludge" using a callback is utilized, the RestTemplate might have resources locked up internally, waiting for the response before invoking the callback. When the underlying socket is accessible, network I/O can be aborted by closing the socket from another thread. For ...


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If you want to use ByteArrayResource, simply register a ResourceHttpMessageConverter. If you want to use a byte[], simply register a ByteArrayHttpMessageConverter. The content type of the image part should be an image type, like image/png, not application/json. You can set each individual part's data type with HttpHeaders partHeaders = new ...


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As I cans ee you are using a TilesViewResolver; this viewResolver tries to respond in HTML; I suggest to you to use a org.springframework.web.servlet.view.ContentNegotiatingViewResolver (an article is available here Spring ContentNegotingViewResolver Basically the point is that spring tries to respond in HTML since you are using the TilesViewResolver; you ...


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So to call the URL from the method : You can use the @Value annotation like this : @Value("${app.endpoint}") private String appEndpoint; The configuration in your XML : <context:property-placeholder location="classpath:placeholder.properties"/> HTH, Gyan


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I did some research and havent' seen yet a way to implement RestTemplate as a service. I have seen RestTemplate defined in the bean config and auto wired in - https://www.informit.com/guides/content.aspx?g=java&seqNum=546 To summarize, most of the examples I have seen use Resttemplate, similar to how you have implemented in your code.


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Your exception is because you have not registered message convertors for handling xml responses returned from the service. You can use xstream marshallers etc and there are plenty of example out there in web. http://www.informit.com/guides/content.aspx?g=java&seqNum=546 https://spring.io/blog/2009/03/27/rest-in-spring-3-resttemplate


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Try to use ParameterizedTypeReference instead of wildcarded Map. It should looks like this. ParameterizedTypeReference<Map<String, Object>> typeRef = new ParameterizedTypeReference<Map<String, Object>>() {}; ResponseEntity<Map<String, Object>> response = restTemplate.exchange(finalUrl.toString(), HttpMethod.GET, null, ...


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I highly recommend to use Unirest.io from Mashape. It gives you the opportunity to simply create POST Request: Unirest.post("http://link.to/rest").field("secret", "xxx").field("response", "xxx").asJsonAsync(new Callback<JsonNode>() { @Override public void completed(HttpResponse<JsonNode> httpResponse) { String response = ...


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Looks like you can inject your own HttpMessageConverter implementation which accepts all requests - canWrite returns true. And add desired headers within write method to the HttpOutputMessage.getHeaders(). I remember as I overrided once ClientHttpRequestFactory.createRequest to do something similar for other server-specific static header. UPDATE From ...


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You can set your breakpoint at the class public abstract class AbstractHttpMessageConverter<T> implements HttpMessageConverter<T> in the Method public final void write(T t, MediaType contentType, HttpOutputMessage outputMessage) to see what the converted string!


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Reference Spring Boot's TestRestTemplate implementation as follows: https://github.com/spring-projects/spring-boot/blob/master/spring-boot/src/main/java/org/springframework/boot/test/TestRestTemplate.java Especially, see the addAuthentication() method as follows: private void addAuthentication(String username, String password) { if (username ...


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The problem is that you're getting a JSON array, but you're trying to deserialize that JSON with a POJO, FilterVO in your case. Try changing this line: ResponseEntity<FilterVO> responseEntity = restTemplate.exchange(url, HttpMethod.GET, entity, FilterVO.class); by this one: ResponseEntity<List<FilterVO>> responseEntity = ...


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I had to do a few things to get this working. First I had to convert the JSONObject to a string, as in: HttpEntity<String> entityCredentials = new HttpEntity<String>(jsonCredentials.toString(), httpHeaders); The reason being that there is no mapping message converter for the JSONObject class while there is one for the String class. Second I ...


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I know this is super old, but another fix is to add a @ResponseStatus annotation onto the controller and specify HttpStatus.NoContent as the value. This way you are accurately returning a status and don't have to say that nothing (void) is a response body.


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Please use private List<Data> data = new AllarList<Data>( ); and please provide getters( ) and setters( ) methods in both the classes. Put @JsonInclude(Include.NON_EMPTY) above Data class Please add below dependencies under section at your main POM.xml file and do maven compile. Then I guess your issue will get resolved. ...


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Looks like you change content type for request, but "application/json" have to be in the response headers, and the fact that you still have the same exception tells that you have wrong media type "text/json" in the response, there are no such media type in HTTP. Just look at implementation of restTemplate.exchange("http://server.com",HttpMethod.GET, entity, ...


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ResponseEntity<JsonVO> responseEntity = restTemplate.getForEntity(url, JsonVO.class, vars); JsonVO jsonVO = responseEntity.getBody(); HttpHeaders headers = responseEntity.getHeaders(); //<-- your headers


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The exception and stack trace says it all: On the client-side you have: ResponseEntity<String> response = restTemplate.exchange( restUrl, HttpMethod.valueOf(method), new HttpEntity<byte[]>(headers), // <-- contains bad "Content-Type" value String.class); The headers map contains "Content-Type" -> ...



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