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5

That's called a cross join (or a cartesian product): select c.field, p.field from client c cross join product p It's fairly straight-forward to combine the columns together at this point.


2

The only option would be #5: put the data in an ArrayList and use toArray to extract an array. Options #3 and #4 (extra queries) are a bad idea, speed-wise, because database queries have an inherent latency, no matter how fast your database is. Options #1 and #2 are just a bad idea; ResultSet is meant to be iterated in one direction. While you can move ...


2

Use CROSS JOIN SELECT C.client_column + CONVERT(VARCHAR(50), P.Product_column) FROM client C CROSS JOIN product P


2

So long as the arbitrary query qualifies to be used as a nested query (i.e. no CTEs, unique column names, etc.), this can be achieved by loading the query's metadata into a temp table, then retrieving column details via sys.tables: SELECT TOP 0 * INTO #t FROM (query goes here) q SELECT name FROM tempdb.sys.columns WHERE object_id = ...


2

You should copy the data from the ResultSet into objects of your own before closing the PreparedStatement. For instance: preparedStatement = conn.prepareStement("select * from people"); resultSet = preparedStatement.executeQuery(); //copying the value while(resultSet.hasNext()){ String name = resultSet.getString("name"); String surname = ...


2

Queries that have a LIMIT clause can cause this error even when --allow_large_results is set. Enforcing the LIMIT clause forces all the output data through a single node, which removes the ability to return large results. Try removing the limit 1000000 from your query. We're working on adding this to the limitations in our documentation for large query ...


2

You can't use something compiled in Java 8 (for instance) in a lower version (say Java 7). You will get something like Unsupported major.minor version.... You need to use two JARs, one for version 1.7 and the other one for version 1.8. Eventually, the one for the 1.7 can't have that SQLType if it's not supported on that JDK; on the other hand, you are ...


1

In this case, I would call it the application’s fault. After all, your class is implementing the ResultSet interface and applications using JDBC should be compiled against that interface instead of your implementation class. If a Java 7 application is compiled under Java 7 (where SQLType does not exist) against the Java 7 version of the ResultSet interface, ...


1

For some reason what i did was add an AS to my query along with adding a if statement to my code caused the resultset to work with my code and allowed me to pull numbers from my database. Thank you for your help. Here is the updated code i added if it helps anyone. private boolean CheckEmployee(long bDays) throws ClassNotFoundException, SQLException { ...


1

try { stmt = con.createStatement(); ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery(query); while (rs.next()) { int aCheck = rs.getInt("column name"); } }catch(){} like this


1

The option 1 should work fine and I have used the same. while (rs.next()) { boolean noUse= rs.getBoolean(1); } In mysql, tinyint act as boolean (but save the physical value as 0/1) When you perform the above code, if field value = 0 then ; noUse=false else if field value= 1 then ; noUse=true


1

If those are constant values, you can use the values clause: select * from ( values (1), (4), (7) ) as t(id); If your values are inside a string literal, you can use this: select * from unnest(string_to_array('1,2,3,4', ',')) as id;


1

You could unnest it as an array: SELECT UNNEST(ARRAY[1, 4, 7])


1

You can use the union To get what you want.But if this is the sting as 1,4,7 comma seprated then you need to use the regexp_split_to_table function. Mentioned here and here Select 1 UNION select 4 UNION select 7



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