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314

The capture of self here is coming in with your implicit property access of self.timerDisp - you can't refer to self or properties on self from within a block that will be strongly retained by self. You can get around this by creating a weak reference to self before accessing timerDisp inside your block: __weak typeof(self) weakSelf = self; [player ...


131

Replying to myself: My understanding of the documentation says that using keyword block and setting the variable to nil after using it inside the block should be ok, but it still shows the warning. __block ASIHTTPRequest *request = [[ASIHTTPRequest alloc] initWithURL:... [request setCompletionBlock:^{ NSDictionary *jsonDictionary = [[CJSONDeserializer ...


99

1) Shouldn't retain now be replace with strong or weak? No. You cannot replace retain with weak; they are different. And strong is a 100% synonym for retain; they are identical. You can use either, so there is no "should" here. You can replace retain with strong if you like, but you don't have to. 2) Why does the auto-generated code still use retain ...


72

Do not use -retainCount. The absolute retain count of an object is meaningless. You should call release exactly same number of times that you caused the object to be retained. No less (unless you like leaks) and, certainly, no more (unless you like crashes). See the Memory Management Guidelines for full details.


70

It is recommended you declare properties for all of your IBOutlets for clarity and consistency. The details are spelled out in the Memory Management Programming Guide. The basic gist is, when your NIB objects are unarchived, the nib loading code will go through and set all of the IBOutlets using setValue:forKey:. When you declare the memory management ...


65

There's no such thing as the "scope of an object" in Objective-C. Scope rules have nothing to do with an object's lifetime — the retain count is everything. You usually need to claim ownership of your instance variables. See the Objective-C memory management rules. With a retain property, your property setter claims ownership of the new value and ...


63

As noted in the memory management rules, whenever you have an object that you have created with +alloc, +new, -copy, or -mutableCopy, you own it and are responsible for releasing it at some point. (In fact, +new is just shorthand for [[MyClass alloc] init].) As you noted, creating an array via [NSArray new] without releasing it is a memory leak. However, if ...


57

Instruments can show you the call stack for every malloc, release, and retain for any Obj-C object in your app with no code changes required. It works when you're using ARC, which is not the case for the solution from fabio. It's really useful for finding those mystery retains - e.g. when an object just won't dealloc when it should. Here's how: CMD + I ...


46

No. The problem occurs when your block retains an object which retains it. Your block will retain any object that it references, except for those annotated with __block. Hence: // The following creates a retain cycle which will leak `self`: self.block = ^{ [self something]; }; self retains block, and block implicitly retains self. This will also happen ...


44

I found this bit of code awhile ago (can't remember who to attribute it to). It's quite ingenius, using a Category to allow the creation of a mutable array that does no retain/release by backing it with a CFArray with proper callbacks. @implementation NSMutableArray (WeakReferences) + (id)mutableArrayUsingWeakReferences { return [self ...


43

The issue occurs because you're assigning a block to request that has a strong reference to request in it. The block will automatically retain request, so the original request won't deallocate because of the cycle. Make sense? It's just weird because you're tagging the request object with __block so it can refer to itself. You can fix this by creating a ...


40

I guess asking the question after looking at the problem for over an hour led me to figure it out: I just changed my code to check the text box AFTER displaying the view... now everything is instantiated. Imagine that: the UI elements aren't instantiated until you display them!


36

__weak MyClass *self_ = self; // that's enough self.loadingDidFinishHandler = ^(NSArray *receivedItems, NSError *error){ if (!error) { [self_ showAlertWithError:error]; } else { self_.items = [NSArray arrayWithArray:receivedItems]; [self_.tableView reloadData]; } }; And one very important thing to remember: do not use ...


34

To answer all three questions in one: retain and strong are synonymous with each other, so both are correct. The documentation states retain implies __strong ownership strong implies __strong ownership


34

I'm assuming you mean a static object pointer, such as static NSString *foobar;. Such variables indeed have a lifetime as long as the application, but the variables we're talking about are pointers only. In Objective-C, objects are always dynamically allocated, and so we always address them with a pointer to their type, but the underlying data for an object ...


32

In a general setting, retaining an object will increase its retain count by one. This will help keep the object in memory and prevent it from being blown away. What this means is that if you only hold a retained version of it, you share that copy with whomever passed it to you. Copying an object, however you do it, should create another object with ...


24

The documentation says: Retaining an object creates a strong reference, and an object cannot be deallocated until all of its strong references are released. If two objects retain each other, neither object ever gets deallocated because the connection between them cannot be broken As an example, let's consider a UITableViewController that implements ...


22

You would use copy when you want to guarantee the state of the object. NSMutableString *mutString = [NSMutableString stringWithString:@"ABC"]; NSString *b = [mutString retain]; [mutString appendString:@"Test"]; At this point b was just messed up by the 3rd line there. NSMutableString *mutString = [NSMutableString stringWithString:@"ABC"]; NSString *b = ...


20

Just guessing... but you may overwrite the retain method of the custom class calling super and throwing a nice NSLog to print the call stack. Update with the actual code from Joe -(id) retain { NSLog(@"%@", [NSThread callStackSymbols]); return ([super retain]); } Another important detail is that [NSThread callStackSymbols] returns a NSArray of ...


20

The best explanation I ever heard was from Aaron Hillegass: Think of the object as a dog. You need a leash for a dog to keep it from running away and disappearing, right? Now, think of a retain as a leash. Every time you call retain, you add a leash to the dog's collar. You are saying, "I want this dog to stick around." Your hold on the leash insures ...


18

and don't forget to access it via self.name = something; because name = something; will not care about the generated setter/getter methods but instead assign the value directly.


17

You are correct that the retain count is 2 after adding it to an array. However, you should only worry about the retain counts you add to the item explicitly. Retaining an object is a contract that says "I'm not done with you, don't go away." A basic rule of thumb (there are exceptions, but they are usually documented) is that you own the object when you ...


16

Check documentation of NSValue valueWithNonretainedObject method : This method is useful for preventing an object from being retained when it’s added to a collection object (such as an instance of NSArray or NSDictionary).


15

choose copy, unless you have a very specific reason not to, as well as all the supporting code/interface to back that up. i detailed the rationale and several implications here: NSMutableString as retain/copy that example is based on NSStrings, but the same applies for NSArrays.


14

A property is just a declaration that allows for setters, getters, and dot-syntax accessors (interface variable hiding). It does absolutely nothing on its own but allow you to use -[myInstance myProperty] to get the variable or use -[myInstance setMyProperty:] to set it (yes, the method name is auto-assigned to -setProperty: and -property). When declaring ...


14

Simply: color = [NSColor blackColor]; ARC will manage the lifetime of your objects so you don't need release, retain or autorelease any longer.


14

Sounds like you're mixing up two concepts here. Saving state across Configuration Changes does not involve serialization. If you request setRetainInstance() for a Fragment then that means it will fully stay in memory and not be re-created only for configuration changes. A similar mechanism is available for Activity objects but they need to explicitly ...


13

www.whentouseretaincount.com -- i.e. don't use retainCount as it'll cause nothing but confusion. Even for learning the innards. If you want to know how and when blocks retain objects, you should look at the compiler, runtime, and blocks runtime sources. All are available. A block may or may not retain an object. Specifically, a block may only ...


13

A simplified version of Jonathan Grynspan's accepted answer: The retain isn't for the variable which points to an object. That variable will last forever because it's static. The retain is for the object the variable points to. Without the retain the object could (and should) be deallocated. Then you've got a variable pointing to a thing which will cause a ...


13

Since you're asking about NSArray (rather than NSMutableArray), you should use copy. NSArray is immutable, so you don't expect a property of that type to change. But NSMutableArray is a subclass of NSArray, so it's perfectly valid for someone to pass in a NSMutableArray. If you just retain that object, then it may change right under your nose. If you copy ...



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