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34

I would say that requiring this to make the program ill-formed (that is, make this a compilation error) would complicate the standard considerably for little benefit. You'd have to exactly spell out in the standard when such cases shall be diagnosed, and all compilers would have to implement them. If you specify too little, it will not be too useful. And ...


14

You're probably returning an object that's on the stack. That is, return_Object() probably looks like this: Object& return_Object() { Object object_to_return; // ... do stuff ... return object_to_return; } If this is what you're doing, you're out of luck - object_to_return has gone out of scope and been destructed at the end of ...


13

No. ref still refers to me which will be destroyed at the end of the call. You should return a copy of your result (not prefixed by &). MatrizEsparsa MatrizEsparsa::operator+(const MatrizEsparsa& outra) const { return MatrizEsparsa(outra.linhas(),outra.colunas()); } I also added two const specifiers (to the parameter and to the method) since ...


10

Recommended reading: Effective C++ by Scott Meyers. You find a very good explanation about this topic (and a lot more) in there. In brief, if you return by value, the copy constructor and the destructor will be involved by default (unless the compiler optimizes them away - that's what happens in some of your cases). If you return by reference (or pointer) ...


10

See http://community.schemewiki.org/?scheme-faq-language question "Is there a way to emulate call-by-reference?". In general I think that fights against scheme's functional nature so probably there is a better way to structure the program to make it more scheme-like.


9

Because vector<bool> is specialized in STL, and does not actually meet the requirements of a standard container. Herb Sutter talks about it more in a GOTW article: http://www.gotw.ca/gotw/050.htm


9

This is a correct implementation. It is typical that a postfix operator will be worse on performance because you have to create another copy before doing the increment (and this is why I've gotten in the habit of always using prefix unless I need something else). With return-by-reference, you're returning an l-value reference to the current object. The ...


8

read about RVO and NRVO (in a word these two stands for Return Value Optimization and Named RVO, and are optimization techniques used by the compiler to do what you're trying to achieve) you'll find a lot of subjects here on stackoverflow


8

It is more idiomatic to call the prefix increment of the object itself in the postfix increment: X operator++(int) { X copy(*this); operator++(); // or alternatively, ++(*this); return copy; } The logic of incrementing an X object is thus contained in the prefix version.


8

Make iFace noncopyable by putting the copy constructor and assignment operator under "private". Then provide an explicit Copy method. class Type { public: virtual Copy(Type& dest) = 0; private: Type (const Type &) {assert(false)} Type & operator=(const Type &) {assert(false)} } You can also use boost noncopyable to do the same thing ...


6

A vector<bool> is not a real container. Your code is effectively trying to return a reference to a single bit, which is not allowed. If you change your container to a deque, I believe you'll get the behavior you expect.


6

c is a copy. If you wrote char &c = someString[2]; then it would have been a reference.


6

You are right to be worried, you are returning a reference to a temporary here: Coordinate& operator+ (const Coordinate& lhs, const Coordinate& rhs) { return Coordinate(lhs) += rhs; } You need to return a Coordinate by value, for example like this: Coordinate operator+ (Coordinate lhs, const Coordinate& rhs) { return lhs += rhs; } ...


6

Assuming that the code in your function is of the form: std::string data = ...; //do some processing. return data; Then this is required to call std::string's move constructor if elision is not available. So worst-case, you get to move from your internal string. If you can't afford the cost of a move operation, then you'll have to pass it as a reference. ...


6

This looks like a kind of corner case. The constructor definition in §2.8.11.2.1/7 says: Requires: F shall be CopyConstructible. f shall be Callable (20.8.11.2) for argument types ArgTypes and return type R. [...] §2.8.11.2/2 says: A callable object f of type F is Callable for argument types ArgTypes and return type R if the expres- sion INVOKE ...


6

For the same reason C allows you to return a pointer to a memory block that's been freed. It's valid according to the language specification. It's a horribly bad idea (and is nowhere close to being guaranteed to work) but it's still valid inasmuch as it's not forbidden. If you're asking why the standard allows this, it's probably because, when references ...


6

Also, because you may want to get the current stack pointer (whatever that means on your particular implementation). This function: void* get_stack_pointer (void) { int x; return &x; }; AFAIK, it is not undefined behavior if you don't dereference the resulting pointer. is much more portable than this one: void* get_stack_pointer (void) { ...


5

It just passes back a reference (assuming big_obj is a class). I wouldn't use the term "by reference" here, as that has a subtly different meaning when it comes to parameter passing - but assuming big_obj is a class - a reference type - the value of ret_obj is a reference, and that reference will be what's returned. I don't have any articles on this from a ...


5

char c = someString[2]; copies the character at position 2 into 'c'


5

You can only return non-local objects by reference. The destructor may have invalidated some internal pointer, or whatever. Don't be afraid of returning values -- it's fast!


5

Other than special cases where you really, really know what you're doing, it should return either class& or void. (And most of the time, returning void should just be a placeholder for "I'm being lazy and haven't gotten around to making sure that returning class& makes sense") Returning class is a bad idea because it wastes time and memory (it makes ...


4

I think you're mistaking your operators. There are 2: struct Foo { Foo& operator+=(Foo const&); Foo operator+(Foo const&) const; }; As you notice, the first returns a reference to itself, the second does not. Also, in general, the second should be written as a free function. Foo operator+(Foo const&, Foo const&); This can be ...


4

This allocates an empty string: NSString * str = [[NSString alloc] init]; This replaces the previous value of str with a new string which is apparently already autoreleased; the old value of str is leaked: int retCode = [Exp func:&str]; This attempts to release the new value of str, which is already balanced, so it's an overrelease and a crash ...


4

There are two dichotomous issues here with similar vocabulary involved: value versus reference types, and passing variables by value versus by reference. Value v. Reference Types The first issue is value versus reference types. Value types are passed around through copying - usually. The value types are: Date Char U/Int(16/32/64) Decimal Single and ...


4

Some monor changes to your class should fix it. template <class T> class MyClass { private: vector<T> _items; public: // This works better if you pass by const reference. // This allows the compiler to form temorary objects and pass them to the method. void add(T const& item) { ...


4

It is legal; auto_ptr objects will remain alive until the end of expression (i.e. function call). But it is ugly as hell. Just overload your function: int CalculateStuff(int param1, int param2, int& result1, int& result2); int CalculateStuff(int param1, int param2) { int r1=0, r2=0; return CalculateStuff(param1, param2, r1, r2); }


4

According to Bjarne Stroustrup, if some parameters are optional, it is an ideal case for making them pointer type, so that you can pass NULL when you don't need to pass arguments for them: int CalculateStuff(int param1, int param2, int * result1, int * result2); And use: int result = CalculateStuff(100, 42, NULL, NULL); All other alternatives would not ...


4

You can only use Object& return_Object(); if the object returned has a greater scope than the function. For example, you can use it if you have a class where it is encapsulated. If you create an object in your function, use pointers. If you want to modify an existing object, pass it as an argument. class MyClass{ private: Object ...



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