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9

Methods are attributes too. You cannot reuse the name title for both a method and an attribute. On your instance, you set self.title to a string, and that's not callable: >>> class window: ... def __init__(self, title='window'): ... self.title = title ... def title(self, title): ... if title: ... self.title = ...


8

Your code is finding the number that are equal at the same index. There are several ways you can find the size of the intersection. A simple but O(m*n) implementation would be to iterate over all elements of b for each element of a. If the arrays are sorted, you could use separate indexes for the two arrays, advancing each when it can no longer match. ...


7

Philosophically, you could argue that returning the result of a void-returning function should be allowed but, sadly, that's not the case here, at least for Java. It is valid for C++ however. If you try out the following program: #include <iostream> void xyzzy(void) {} void plugh(void) { return xyzzy();} int main() { std::cout << ...


7

Your code is effectively: bool CheckExisting() { // Some setup code for (int i = 0; i < fCount; i++) { // Code which isn't terribly relevant return ...; } } Now the C# 5 language specification section 8.8.3 talks about the reachability of the end of a for statement: The end point of a for statement is reachable if ...


6

Your main method has a different array called line than the one your calcLine method populates. You should assign the returned array of your calcLine method to the line variable of your main method : line = calcLine(n,k,m);


6

You havent declared thegame as parameter. Change public void information(List<thegame>) { System.out.print(thegame); }} to public void information(List<Game> thegame) { System.out.print(thegame); }}


6

If you'd indent your code, you'd find the problem : public boolean inEven(int o) { if ((o%2)==0) { inEven = true; } else { inEven = false; } return inEven; } // remove this ; // remove this } It would also make more sense to make inEven a local variable (i.e. declare it inside inEven method).


6

This is undefined behavior, a return statement without an expression shall only be used in a function whose return type is void. This is covered in the draft C99 standard section 6.8.6.4 The return statement: [...]A return statement without an expression shall only appear in a function whose return type is void. Interestingly this is an error by ...


5

I would simplify this by introducing a variable max: public static int max(int a, int b, int c, int d) { int max = a; if (b > max) max = b; if (c > max) max = c; if (d > max) max = d; return max; } You could also use Math.max, as suggested by fast snail, but since this seems to be homework, I would ...


5

If you don't need, there is no need to return, you can have return type as void void b_sort(sample &s){ .. }//return nothing


5

Operator & is a bitwise AND operator. In this particular case it is used to mask out the sign bit in a 32-bit number. Here is how it works: the value of (unsigned) 1 << 31 in binary is a number with bit 31 set to 1, and all remaining bits set to zero: 10000000000000000000000000000000 Subtracting 1 from it produces a number with the lower 31 ...


4

Yes, it is true. [stmt.return]/2: A return statement with neither an expression nor a braced-init-list can be used only in functions that do not return a value, that is, a function with the return type cv void, a constructor (12.1), or a destructor (12.4).


4

There is a yield statement which matches perfectly for this usecase. def foo(a): for b in a: yield b This will return a generator which you can iterate. print [b for b in foo([[a, b], [c, d], [e, f]])


4

In your case, get2() invokes undefined behavior because you return a reference to a method-local that goes out of scope. The difference is that returning float returns a float value, while float & returns a reference to a float. The reference can be used to alter the data of the referent; when returning by value you just get a copy. It sounds like you ...


4

It's partly valid. The invalid part is that you try to declare a variable in an expression, which is not allowed. But there's nothing illegal by having multiple unconditional return statements, however only the first will be executed.


4

The problem is not the return inside the for, but that there is no return outside the for. Think about what happens if al.isEmpty(). And think about how often you actually loop. Rethink the placement of the return null. Consider that invoking it.next() a second time is probably not intended - were you really returning the correct element? What if it were ...


4

The difference is in what the users can do with your DataType: with getData1 they can call only member functions marked const, and access member variables as if they were declared constant, and only during the lifetime of the object that returned the reference. with getData2 users can call any methods they wish, and make modifications as needed. The ...


4

The generated code in both cases is completely identical. (You are missing brackets around the code in the first example, but I will just assume that it's a typo and you are actually asking about the difference betwen using return and else.) If you look at the generated code for these two methods: public static void Test1(int errorCode) { if (errorCode ...


3

What do you mean by "first"? The finally runs before execution leaves the method. When else should it run? It is, after all, part of the method. But if you have int x = 1; try{ return x; } finally { x = x + 1; } then the method will still return 1. So the return statement does get executed before the finally block in a way (to determine the return ...


3

You can use the following format for strftime: In [1]: from datetime import date In [2]: date(day=30, month=11, year=2014).strftime('%A %d %B %Y') Out[2]: 'Sunday 30 November 2014' Adding the proper suffix to the day number is more complicated: python format datetime with "st", "nd", "rd", "th" (english ordinal ...


3

Try levelsof command to get distinct values. It's the cat's pajamas.


3

According to the (draft) C99 standard, section 6.8.6.4 The return statement (paragraph 1): A return statement with an expression shall not appear in a function whose return type is void. A return statement without an expression shall only appear in a function whose return type is void. So the code would be invalid. Compiling this using GCC with ...


3

If you want to print your first colour, try the following: def main(): firstColour, secondColour, thirdColour, fourthColour = userInputs() print(firstColour) When you return multiple values in python in a function, it packs them into whats called a "tuple" which is a list of values put simply. You have to "unpack" them in order to use them. ...


3

The keyword "return" is not a function. The documentations says that return is a statement. The return statement ends function execution and specifies a value to be returned to the function caller. That means ( console.log("Am"), console.log("I"), console.log("a"), console.log("function?") ) is evaluated as an expression and the ...


3

If fCount were to be 0 then your loop would not execute and you'll not hit any of the return statements. Some condensing and improved indentation makes it clear: int fCount = Directory.GetFiles(path, "*.xml", SearchOption.AllDirectories).Length; for(int i = 0;i<fCount;i++){ ... if(txtFirstName.Text == loginAcc.firstName ...


3

How about throwing an exception from assert if not true and otherwise nothing. That way, you can use them as you might be familiar already from other languages. Code example: assert = function(condition, message) { if(condition) { console.log(message); } else { throw "Assertion failed!"; } }


3

public class ChkNum { public boolean inEven(int o) { return o%2 ==0; } }


3

Using return immediately exits a function. Meaning, the return leapyears line will never be reached because of the return sum + 366 line directly above it. If you want to return two values from numberofdays, you can put them in a tuple and return that: return sum + 366, leapyears Below is a demonstration: >>> def func(): ... return 1, 2 ...


2

Return a tuple: func getTime() -> (Int, Int, Int) { ... return ( hour, minute, second) } Then it's invoked as: let (hour, minute, second) = getTime() or: let time = getTime() println("hour: \(time.0)")


2

The error message provided by the compiler is telling you exactly what the problem is. The function param() has not been declared in class FaceSvlCntHtmlLogger. In order for a function the be defined outside of a class you also have to declare it inside of the class definition. class FaceSvlCntHtmlLogger { public: int param(); }



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