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0

You can use a Java Agent to do this trick: The Agent is very straightforward: It registers a class transformer, which can get access to the byte-code: import java.lang.instrument.Instrumentation; import java.lang.instrument.ClassFileTransformer; public class ClassDumpAgent { /** * This method is called before the application’s main-method is ...


1

You're right about Entitlements.plist. Problem is very simple - MobileCal.app is using custom sandbox profile. There are actually many sandbox profiles in iOS, not just for AppStore apps. Many iOS system components use them. To know which one you need to look at the app's entitlements. More specifically, seatbelt-profiles key. MobileCal.app is signed with ...


1

Sorry, but what you want to do is not possible. The linker wants to see the shared library so it knows which symbols are defined there and which are not; it needs to know that to understand how the linkage will work. You'll have to copy the target's shared library to your development system, or else use explicit loading as suggested in the answer you ...


0

With the actual pascal implementations you can use the delay procedure, no delay loop necessary. But how long should the delay be? I can think of four ways to get this information. Eventually you can find the documentation of the card or the parts thereon where the necessary delays are listed. You can find an old PC and measure a delay loop with a very ...


1

This is the fourth time you have asked the same question. The reason you are not seeing any responses is that no one can help you. The ".DAT" file extension is widely used by software designers for custom data formats bound to their particular applications, especially when there is no obvious reason to call it anything else. Your file could have been ...


1

Maybe you could get the position of the section header table and time it with the amount of entries and the entry size? Not entirely sure but that's my best bet.


1

Jailbreak + FLEX. It's a magical combination.


0

Make sure you have the right privileges to access the database that you want. Some database software hides parts of a database depending on the privileges. So trying to access it as Administrator or brute forcing may work. It all depends on the privilege settings given to the database.


1

Short answer: You can't. The client is fundamentally untrustable. Blizzard (and other purveyors of anti-cheat software) are engaged in a constant arms race with the cheaters. You can't just implement it once and be done with it; you have to constantly monitor your product (either heuristically or via player reports) for cheating, then figure out how to ...


0

Assuming I understand what you're saying in your posting, this is how I'd do it: Header: #pragma pack(push, 1) class CPlayer { public: unsigned char Unknown00[9649]; char Unknown9649; }; class CVehicle { public: DWORD modelid; // 0 float pos[3]; // 4 CPlayer *pPlayer; // 16 }; #pragma pack(pop) Code: char SomethingIWant; CVehicle ...


2

Looks pretty close to me, although in the ASM the increment is only at the beginning of the loop, and the condition is not checked the first time through. Consider using DO...WHILE instead. EDIT: also, your assignment is wrong. MOV instruction copies from the 2nd parameter to the first. You have it going the other way in your C code.


0

Here is an implementation of the solution provided by Alexander Drogin using SQL Decoding a date: DATEADD(Day, (convert(int, CAST(REVERSE(0xB5721600) as varbinary))-737)/2, CAST('0001-01-03' as date)) AS [DecodedDate] Encoding a date: CAST(REVERSE(CAST((DATEDIFF(Day, cast('0001-01-03' as date), cast('2013-12-11' as date))*2)+737 as varbinary)) as ...


0

Decoding a date field is indeed tricky. It is actually a number of days since the earliest supported date (03-01-01), but multiplied by 2 (because even numbers correspond to normal dates, and odd - to closing dates), and with a small shift for special values. Here is how it is calculated (example in PowerShell): $days = [Convert]::ToInt32("167153", 16) ...


2

It is clear from the assembly that this code expects a meaningful value in ECX. mov edi, edi push ebp mov ebp, esp sub esp, 0Ch cmp [ebp+<wchar_t *>], 0 push esi mov esi, ecx !! ecx has not been written to before here, now it is read You believe that the function is stdcall. And for an stdcall function, the value of ECX is ...


0

I'd recommend checking out samples from https://developer.android.com/samples/index.html


2

This question may not exactly fit the parameters for StackOverflow. But I've seen much worse posts, and I think this question deserves a good answer. While 32767 may seem like an arbitrary number, it's actually the upper limit of a 16-bit signed integer (called a short in C). The range of a short goes from -32768 to 32767. A 16-bit integer can also be ...


0

There are two main methods for editing an application you don't have the source for. The first one, as you've discovered is decompile, edit, recompile. The advantage is that you don't have to know anything about bytecode since it's just decompiled to Java. The main disadvantage is that even the best decompilers can't guarantee producing recompileable code. ...


1

I'll try to explain it by reversing the code back into C. Intel's Instruction Set Reference (Volume 2 of Software Developer's Manual) is invaluable for this kind of reverse engineering. REPNE SCASB The logic for REPNE and SCASB combined: while (ecx != 0) { temp = al - *(BYTE *)edi; SetStatusFlags(temp); if (DF == 0) // DF = Direction Flag ...


0

After a long period of research I've found my own answer! This piece of code gets the module base address(AKA entry point)(you need to include TlHelp32.h and tchar.h): DWORD getModuleBaseAddr(DWORD procId, TCHAR * lpszModuleName) { HANDLE hSnapshot = CreateToolhelp32Snapshot(TH32CS_SNAPMODULE, procId); DWORD moduleBaseAddr = 0; if (hSnapshot != ...


1

Well, you cannot pass that function as the thread proc for CreateRemoteThread because that function does not have the correct signature. So, you need to pass a function that does have the right signature. One very common way to do that is to pass the address of LoadLibrary. You'll need to supply your own DLL. The DllMain for that DLL can then create a new ...


0

There is a new version which fixs many bugs such this :It is 0.5.1 insead of 0.5 BuildConfig.groovy runtime ':db-reverse-engineer:0.5.1'


1

Your only solution really is to inject code into the other process that does the right setup of the registers, and then calling the function you want to call. The CreateRemoteThread has strict calling convention, so you can't force it to have specific register values on entry. The other alternative is to use the debug functionality in Windows to alter the ...


1

It compares the byte at es:[edi] to whatever in in al is and repeats this step until either ecx becomes zero or the value at es:[edi] matches the value in al. After each step, edi is incremented so it points to the next byte in memory. The program applies not to the counter (ecx) afterwards, based on the following instruction. repnz means "repeat until zero ...


5

AL is involved, because scas scans the memory for the value of AL. AL has been zeroed so that the instruction finds the terminating zero at the end of the string. scas itself increments (or decrements, depending on the direction flag) EDI automatically. The REPNZ prefix (which is more readable in the REPNE form) repeats the scas as long as the comparison is ...


1

I think you can query the load address using GetModuleInformation, passing NULL for the module handle parameter. If that doesn't work, you can take the longer route through EnumProcessModules and GetModuleBaseName.


0

Up to to the OS X 10.9.x only injecting code to Finder process via mach_inject was a solution (and even Dropbox did that). However since 10.10 there are Finder plugins, which can customized context menus, add buttons to Toolbar and put overlays over the file icons.


0

Disclaimer: This is, strictly speaking, not an answer to your question because it uses not BCEL but Javassist. Nevertheless you may find my experiences and code useful. Few years ago I've written e Maven plugin (I called it Storyteller Maven Plugin) for this very purpose - to analyse JARs files for dependencies which are unnecessary or nor required. ...


0

Someone voted to close this question as "too broad". I'm not sure whether this is the appropriate close reason here, but it might be, because one could consider this question (which is a follow up to your previous question) as just asking others to do some work for you. However, to answer the basic question of how to detect references between classes in a ...


1

This is a bug in the plugin - it assumes that all tables have a primary key and fails when the object representing that in the model is null. I released version 0.5.1 of the plugin with a fix for this.


0

The short version The ??s represent bytes that have no mapping in the executable file. In Windows, they will be initialized to zero when the image is loaded into memory. If this isn't clear, read on: How sections work (Based on the comments, I'm going to assume that you are looking at a PE file) In the PE file format, a number of sections are defined. ...


0

To know exactly what is happening, we would have to look at the assembler code for function bof. Anyway, an oversight in your approach is that you did not write the parameter value onto the stack; the 8-byte return address "\xa4\x05\x40\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00" is popped off the stack by the retq in foo - we see this from the difference between before ...


-1

There are many problem with this code: DWORD detour::SetHook(DWORD src, DWORD dst, int len) { DWORD is not a type. You need to look it up but generally it will turn blue if it is a real type (int, float double are the basics). BYTE* backup; Also not a real type. Use an int or preferably a double if it is very big. memcpy((void*) trampolineAddr, ...


1

You can call parse() on the JavaParser to obtain a JavaClass class, which offers all the required information: import java.io.IOException; import java.util.Enumeration; import java.util.jar.JarEntry; import java.util.jar.JarFile; import org.apache.bcel.classfile.ClassParser; import org.apache.bcel.classfile.Field; import ...


0

This stack overflow question has more information about this: Does Entity Framework Code First support stored procedures? Apparently, this works with EF 6 and VS 2012 or later.


4

In order to rewrite the address, you have to know the exact way the callq instructions are encoded. Let's take the disassembly output of the first call: 4006e1: e8 67 ff ff ff callq 40064d <myfunc> 4006e6: ... You can clearly see that the instruction is encoded with 5 bytes. The e8 byte is the instruction opcode, and 67 ff ff ff is the ...


0

You're actually sending a GET request to https://login.live.com/oauth20_authorize.srf, which is immediately followed by a POST request to https://login.live.com/ppsecure/post.srf. If you look at the response to that POST request, you'll see a substring called access_token in the Location field, and that is your RpsTicket. I'm not seeing RpsHeader in any of ...


0

On IOS 7.0 and below, "SBFrontmostApplicationDisplayIdentifier" from the springboard framework specified the app running in the foreground, but that capability has been blocked (considered as a vulnerability, see the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures page dedicated to it here) in IOS 8. So sorry mate, its a dead end using Private API's


2

Have you tried translating the object center to the world axis, applying your rotation, and then translating back by the opposite amount? In your 2D example you would do a translation of (-7.5,-7.5), apply your rotation, and then translate by (7.5,7.5).


0

Personally, I'd recommend Genymotion instead of the built-in AVDs. I couldn't ever get Xposed working with the regular AVDs. http://www.genymotion.com/ Once you have a Genymotion virtual device created you can just drag-and-drop the XposedInstaller.apk onto the virtual device and it'll move and install the apk automatically. Then it's just a matter of ...


0

x86 is little endianness, so in order to read it you start from right to left of the dword literal. The string is "_MetalMulisha_", fwiw.


4

In decoding compiler output it often helps to rewrite the assembly code in a denser, but still very low-level form (pseudo code), using only elementary, low-level transformations. The point is to group/combine small numbers of instructions in a way that is difficult to get wrong but that exposes the inner logic of the code fragment better. The next step is ...


1

You should have read CHAPTER 2 INSTRUCTION FORMAT in the manual. As a brief summary, the /digit notation uses the reg/opcode field of the modr/m byte as an opcode extension of the given value. The manual says: The reg/opcode field specifies either a register number or three more bits of opcode information.. See also the Table 2-2. 32-Bit Addressing Forms ...


0

Instruction Prefix 0 or 1 Byte Address-Size Prefix 0 or 1 Byte Operand-Size Prefix 0 or 1 Byte Segment Prefix 0 or 1 Byte Opcode 1 or 2 Byte Mod R/M 0 or 1 Byte SIB, Scale Index Base (386+) 0 or 1 Byte Displacement 0, ...



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