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74

There is no such class in the Java API. The Apache Commons class you want is going to be one of the implementations of BidiMap. As a mathematician, I would call this kind of structure a bijection.


59

In addition to Apache Commons, Guava also has a BiMap.


14

Here is a simple class I used to get this done (I did not want to have yet another third party dependency). It does not offer all features available in Maps but it is a good start. public class BidirectionalMap<KeyType, ValueType>{ private Map<KeyType, ValueType> keyToValueMap = new ConcurrentHashMap<KeyType, ValueType>(); ...


8

If no collisions occur, you can always add both directions to the same HashMap :-)


6

DNSPython Technically, you can use DNSPython to do a reverse lookup. Pip install it $ pip install dnspython Then do your reverse query: >>> from dns import resolver >>> from dns import reversename >>> addr = reversename.from_address("74.125.227.114") >>> resolver.query(addr, "PTR")[0] <DNS IN PTR rdata: ...


5

Instead of d[n1] = 'Node 1' use: d[n1] = ('Node 1', n1) Then you have access to n1 no matter how you found the value. I don't believe there is a way with dictionaries to retrieve the original key k1 if all you have is a k2 equal to k1.


4

in model add related_name parent_technique = models.ForeignKey('self', blank=True, null=True, related_name="childrens_tech") all children techniques of smt_technique are smt_technique.childrens_tech.all()


4

From release notes of django-1.5 The upshot of this is that if you are not using {% load url from future %} in your templates, you’ll need to change tags like {% url myview %} to {% url "myview" %}. If you were using {% load url from future %} you can simply remove that line under Django 1.5 Which means, during downgrade, {% url "myview" %} should ...


4

Django admin is really flexible, you can simply add a helper method for it. class PersonAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin): list_display = ('name', 'books') def books(self, obj): return ",".join([k.name for k in obj.book_set.all()])


3

First select the car and the related person when the car name cars = Car.objects.select_related("person").filter(name="Toyota").order_by("person") Now you have all the cars whose name is toyota along with the person for that car, ordered_by person. Now use the python itertools.groupby to group this list for each person from itertools import groupby for ...


3

This is built-in already - see following relations backwards. In your case, just do: obj.technique_set.all() for each obj in t.


3

Have two dictionaries. - Whenever you add a key/value to the primary dictionary, also add them to the reverse dictionary, but with the key/value swapped. For example: # When adding a value: d[n2] = value; # Must also add to the reverse dictionary: rev[value] = d # This means that: value = d[n2] # Will be able to efficiently find out the key used with: ...


3

it is do able... sample program that use it is in Python that I know darkjumper I don't know how it works, but it just works.. you can read the source code in Python and rewrite the software into php You can try executing the reverse ip feature of this software by using -m reverseonly option ./darkjumper.py -t stackoverflow.com -m reverseonly returning ...


2

There is no sure-fire way to do what you are asking. In DNS, a site's IP address, such as "1.5.7.9", has associated with it a domain name like "9.7.5.1.in-addr.arpa". This reverse name may have PTR records pointing to the domain name. So, "example.com" may map to "1.5.7.9" with an A record, and "9.7.5.1.in-addr.arpa" may point back to "example.com". An ...


2

You can easily get the referrer from the request headers. This referrer can be spoofed, but most people do not spoof it and it is already resolved. There is no automatic way to resolve the DNS other than manually resolving it. Like you said, a DNS resolution takes extra time and it makes no sense for Web2Py or any other framework to do it.


2

Think of it this way: you're occasionally doing an extra step to get the value. That's what happens any time you use a conditional test and add a couple steps to a computation. It's obvious there's a little overhead associated with it, but worrying about it at this point is premature optimization. You CAN get a feel for the difference, by using the ...


2

Each enum has a method values() so You can do like that: for(YourEnum type : values()){ if(/*is Equal to Your descriptionText*/){ return type; } } throw new IllegalArgumentException("No such BailiffPaymentStatus:"+dbRepresentation);


1

This relies on the fact that the enum member constructors are run before the static initializer. The initializer then caches the members and their long forms. import java.util.Arrays; import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.Map; public enum Abbreviation { ABBR1("long text 1", "another description 1", "yet another one 1"), ABBR2("long text 2", ...


1

Searching in ruby 1.9.3 and 2.0.0 are O(n) operations. static VALUE rb_hash_key(VALUE hash, VALUE value) { VALUE args[2]; args[0] = value; args[1] = Qnil; rb_hash_foreach(hash, key_i, (VALUE)args); return args[1]; } Implementation of rb_hash_foreach: void rb_hash_foreach(VALUE hash, int (*func)(ANYARGS), VALUE farg) { struct ...


1

Django is built so that you have to put logic in your view. The template is not supposed to contain "advanced logic". Do the query in the view, send the results to the template. return render(request, 'base.html', {'qobj': qobj, 'yes_count': qobj.answer_set.filter(value="Yes").count()}) Template: {{ yes_count }}


1

It's almost (if not completely) impossible to find a free service like the one you are looking for. The reason is because it requires a huge amount of resources to perform a reverse lookup (you basically need to query as much domains as you can). Also, keep in mind every service offering such feature can't be perfect. In fact, the only way to be perfect is ...


1

I'm willing to bet you can, if you can guarantee that what you're checking against, as well as what type your keys are, is Number. Here's a code sample. Sorting costs O(n log(n)), and the linear search is O(n), so the performance of this is about O(n). public <K extends Number & Comparable<K>, V extends Number> K findSmallestKey(Map<K, ...


1

In the .svn folder of your repository you will find a file wc.db. This is a sqlite db. The filename in the pristine folder is actually its sha1 checksum. So you can try something like this: SELECT local_relpath FROM `NODES` WHERE checksum=`$sha1$faa0544abc11c14647e18c2ee1283b445a1fa1e1` or SELECT repos_path FROM `NODES` WHERE ...


1

If you're just looking to find out the domain names (not to block the requests by running a script when the image URL is requested), then they'll be in the request logs. In the admin thingy go to "Logs", select "Requests only" from the drop-down. If you expand "Options" you can filter on the relevant filename. Then expand each request log entry, and the ...


1

Got it, the related_name='relative' was creating the reverse lookup as relative instead of relative_set. relationship = Relationship.objects.get(id=1) personA = relationship.person personB = relationship.relative.all().get()


1

I think this situation is better suited to a recursive relationship of Person to itself through Relationship.


1

Add an inlinemodel admin class BookInline(admin.TabularInline): model = book class PersonAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin): inlines = [BookInline, ] That should cover it.


1

Here is a way to use a custom node object with NetworkX. If you store the object in the "node attribute" dictionary you can use it as a reverse dictionary to get the object back by referencing the id. It's a little awkward but it works. import networkx as nx class Node(object): def __init__(self,id,**attr): self.id=id ...


1

It looks like you actually have more than two levels of Dictionary. Since you cannot support a variable number of dictionaries using this type syntax: Dictionary<string, Dictionary<string, ... >...> nestedDictionary; I can only assume that it is some number greater than two. Let's say that it's three. For any data structure you construct, ...


1

Although I have little direct experience with the C5 collection library, it sounds like you could use their TreeDictionary class. It comes with a whole suite of useful methods for finding, iterating and modifying the tree, and is surprisingly well documented. Another option would be to use the QuickGraph library (which you can find in NuGet or on codeplex). ...



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