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9

Never used PropertyBehavior before, but is this the syntax you're looking for? form.Stub(x=>x.OKButtonEnabled).PropertyBehavior() Rhino Mocks works completely through extension methods now. The only static call I every make anymore is to MockRepository.GenerateStub


8

I think the best links, which are both up to date, and starting from the basics are: getting-started-with-rhino-mocks-aaa using rhino-mocks quick guide


6

The object returned by GenerateStub<T> doesn't record property and method calls. If you want to assert if setters, getters, or methods have been called, use GenerateMock<T> instead. // Replace var mock = MockRepository.GenerateStub<IMyInterface>(); // with var mock = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IMyInterface>(); // and everything ...


5

params is just an array: var resourceRepo = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IResourceRepository>(); resourceRepo .Expect(r => r.GetById( Arg<int>.Is.Equal(123), Arg<string[]>.List.ContainsAll(new[] { "Name", "Super", ...


5

First of all, each test should only have one assertion (unless the other validates the real one) e.q. if you want to assert that all elements of a list are distinct, you may want to assert first that the list is not empty. Otherwise you may get a false positive. In other cases there should only be one assert for each test. Why? If the test fails, it's name ...


4

I hope your mInstance variable is declared as volatile, otherwise your DCL implementation is broken. Seriously, do you really need that level of laziness? I'd personally recommend some of the simpler patterns available. However, when it comes to mocking - no, you can't mock out static calls with RhinoMocks. There are some tools available which allow this, ...


4

You want to use a partial mock, which will only override the method when you create an expectation: classToMock c = MockRepository.GeneratePartialMock<classToMock>(); c.DoIt(); Assert.AreEqual(1, c.IntProperty);


3

Despite other rumors you can mock singletons, see my answer to: How to Mock a Static Singleton? In this case it's even simpler, because there is no static constructor. If your singleton implements an interface already, there'd be no need to change your productive code.


3

Static singletons are difficult to mock and to test, and should be avoided, ideally. As RhinoMocks has pointed out, you can't make a partial mock of your Configuration singleton, but you have some options. Make your private constructor public. This should be considered a quick hack, though. There are much better ways of doing this. Change how your ...


3

Test-driven development doesn't have a side-effect of making you write your code in a different way. It is actually intended to make you write code differently. We think that you write code better when you test it. You are more likely to hide code behind an interface, which is a good thing. It will hopefully make you do lots of stuff in a different way! ...


3

I personally vote for moq, but selection of mocking framework is really up to you. I also think that testability is good enough reason to write your code differently. Interfaces in general are quite hard to overuse and in the long run they probably make your code more maintainable.


3

Is there a way to see if the property was accessed via Rhino Mocks? Yes. You can set up an expectation for the property. If the verification doesn't throw, then you know the property was accessed: var mocks = new MockRepository(); IFoo foo = mocks.DynamicMock<IFoo>; // this sets up an expectation that Name is accessed, and what it should return ...


3

Rhino Mocks uses the overloaded Equals method to compare arguments of the expected invocation and the invocation that actually happened. Some of the objects you are supplying as arguments don't have Equals overloaded (i.e. List class, not sure about the others), so the only way it would work if the supplied arguments had the same references (so were the same ...


2

It sounds like you have two different unit tests to write: Service Proxy unit test: This test will make sure that the callback sent in to the ServiceProxy will be called upon completion of the async call. Data Provider unit test: This test will make sure that when a certain method is called, an event is raised (assuming there were some subscribers). ...


2

Just found a solution. It seems to be a little ugly, but it is the first iteration only probably more elegant version will appear soon. The idea is to create another stub and match Func<> against it: I will provide code for my use case: [Theory] [InlineData(342, 31129, 3456)] public void should_call_service_invoker_and_return_result(int number1, int ...


2

You can use WhenCalled. Actually I didn't understand your question (Is the event fired by the mock or by the unit under test? Who is handling the event?) There is some sample code: bool fired = false; // set a boolean when the event is fired. eventHandler.Stub(x => x.Invoke(args)).WhenCalled(call => fired = true); // dynamically return whether the ...


2

Are you testing ReceivePayment? If not, you really should not be worried about how that interface is implemented (see http://blinkingcaret.wordpress.com/2012/11/20/interaction-testing-fakes-mocks-and-stubs/). If you must, you can use the .Do extension method, for example: interface.Stub(i => i.ReceivePayment()).Do((Func<bool>) (() => if ... ...


2

You can do the following: Expect.Call(() => m_Service.UpdateTrade( Arg<Trade>.Matches(t => t.Delivery.Equals(new DateTime(2013, 7, 3))), Arg<Token>.Is.Anything) ); Please also note, if you are not going to validate token parameter in this tests, then you can use Is.Anything constraint for it.


2

The same test, a bit cleaned up: public interface IX { void Execute(ref object param); } [TestMethod] public void TestMethod() { // Variables needed - can be skipped var inputValue = new object(); var outputValue = new object(); IX activity = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IX>(); ...


1

It seems there is no built-in mechanism to dump arguments for failed assertions. I'd suggest to use an extension method like the following: public static void AssertWasCalledAndDump<T>(this T self, Action<T> action) { try { self.AssertWasCalled(action); } catch (Rhino.Mocks.Exceptions.ExpectationViolationException) { ...


1

This is actually a C# issue. You can't overload the conditional logical operators - && and || directly, in order to overload them the programmer has to overload the &,|, true and false operators, and those operators are used to evaluate an expression containing the && and || operators. More details in this article. Concerning Rhino ...


1

Properties and methods of base classes are part of your derived class, and are therefore part of the system under test (SUT). You only need to mock dependencies of the system under test - other classes that the system under test interacts with. In this situation, you don't need a mock, because TempData is a property of ControllerBase, which your controller ...


1

It's pretty simple :) I assume your indexer parameter type is string. Then in assertion instead of x[TypeName] use x[Arg<string>.Is.Equal(TypeName)] As result your assert should look: manager.Site.AssertWasCalled(x => x[Arg<string>.Is.Equal(TypeName)] = Arg<IList<FcCacheObject>>.Matches(y => y.Count.Equals(1)));


1

Well it would seem to be a schoolboy error RhinoMocks was correct when it said that IEntityRepository.InsertOrUpdate was not being called. the line of code where I map from view model to model in my test var monkey = Mapper.Map<MonkeyModel, Monkey>(monkeyModel); and then use it in the expect this.monkeyRepository.Expect(action => ...


1

It's is important to note that mocking frameworks like Rhinomocks, Moq and NSubstitute use a feature in .NET called DynamicProxy that dynamically generates a derived class of the mock in memory. Classes must: be an interface; or non-sealed class with parameterless constructor; or derive from MarshalByRefObject (moq has moved away from this feature) ...


1

I see a couple of things here. First, you are mocking a concrete class. In most/all cases, this is a bad idea, and usually indicates a flaw in your design (IMHO). If possible, extract an interface and mock that. Second, although technically the mock is overriding the virtual method, it might be better to think of what it is doing is actually ...


1

The lambda in your unit test compiles into a class-level method (a method inside your unit test). Inside your controller, a different lambda compiles into a class-level method (inside the controller). The stub set up in your unit test doesn't match the stub being executed in your controller, so Rhino Mocks returns a default (null). More here: ...


1

If you just want to set up an expectation that the SaveObject will be called, using the new AAA syntax might be easier: this.mockDal.Expect(m => m.SaveObject(entry)).IgnoreArguments();


1

Played around with this a bit and I think I may have what you're looking for. First, I'll display the MSTest code I did to verify this: [TestClass] public class UnitTest3 { private delegate void MakeCallbackDelegate(Action<Entity, ServiceError> callback); [TestMethod] public void CallbackIntoViewModel() { var service = ...


1

Stubs have built in support for property behaviour. In cases where you aren't using stubs, you can use the PropertyBehaviour() method for a similar effect. Within the mediator, you should be using the form object normally -- it should not know that it has been handed a fake object. This code: form.Stub(x=>x.FirstName).Return(item.FirstName) should ...



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