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I found out what the problem was: the method ConvertToLocalOrderHeader should be declared at least protected internal in order to let Rhinomocks override it. Virtual is not enough, being the testing class a differente class. Very easy solution for a problem that took me hours to be solved :/


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An example with ReactiveUI + Moq + Fluent Assertions. As @Raghu already noted, there's no real difference from testing regular classes, but there may be some newer dimensions, such as how to test time-based effects. This may be answered by the Reactive Extensions approach by using a Test Scheduler. In an example from my blog: public class ...


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Unit testing a ViewModel is not any different from testing regular classes. And that is the beauty of MVC. All you do in your view is call the methods. Instead of looking for resources for writing unit test for MVC, I guess you should be looking for how to write testable code. I would recommend you this link: ...


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Your Publish method takes a lambda (i.e. Action or Func) as an argument, not UpdateOrder. I've just implemented your first attempt, and after I've changed the Arg argument to correctly reflect the method signature it works. As a side note: by custom, mocks are supposed to be verified for method calls, stubs shouldn't. A stub is something only to make the ...


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Well, I ended up simply going with what @CodeCaster suggested and using ConfigurationManager anyway (as suggested by his link here). I've posted a sample test below: [Test] public void ShouldProvideFullProductionServiceConnectionRecord() { //NOTE: Open ConfigTests.config in this project to see available ServiceConnection records //Arrange ...


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This is not the sort of scenario that mocking is designed for because you are trying to test an implementation detail. Now if this property was on a different class that the original class accessed via an interface, you would mock that interface and set an expectation with the IgnoreArguments syntax: public interface IMyInterface { string MyString { ...


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The documentation for the Any method is as follows (THEIR spelling and grammar): Repeat the method any number of times. This has special affects in that this method would now ignore orderring So, in short, Any is designed to ignore ordering This raises the question of how would you set the first expectation to return one result, and then any call after ...


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A colleague at work suggested a simple test: We commented out the instance in the tested registry and run the test. It passed. Then we added a new registration in the registry, the same service, but without the lifecycle method, commented the old one and run the test. Just as in the beginning it failed. Then we commented the injection in the Establish ...



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