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65

No. If you let them view it, they can always make a copy of what they saw. You can make it harder for this to happen, but in the end, you can't stop a suitably determined attacker.


53

Two ways: Edit the properties of the service and set the Log On user. The appropriate right will be automatically assigned. Set it manually: Go to Administrative Tools -> Local Security Policy -> Local Policies -> User Rights Assignment. Edit the item "Log on as a service" and add your domain user there.


29

Google is your friend :) Anyways, the divide between role and group comes from concepts of computer security (as opposed to simply resource management). Prof. Ravi Sandhu provides a seminal coverage of the semantic difference between roles and groups. http://profsandhu.com/workshop/role-group.pdf A group is a collection of users with a given set of ...


21

Short of supplying specifically tailored hardware (which is what Microsoft is pushing with its Trusted Computing 'Palladium' initiative) the answer is no, you can't stop 'em to get to the bits. Even in the case of specifically tailored hardware an attacker with enough skills and resources can still get to your content, you just reduce the attack surface ...


13

This will return a bool valid using System.Security.Principal; bool isElevated; WindowsIdentity identity = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent(); WindowsPrincipal principal = new WindowsPrincipal(identity); isElevated = principal.IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator);


8

Nothing is perfect, but you can make copying a little more difficult = less worthwhile. You can watermark preview copies of media. You can serial number all copies so they can be tracked. You could encrypt the media, only allowing it to be decrypted by software that you control. (e.g. Adobe Acrobat documents can be set read-only. Audible ebooks can only be ...


8

Ask a lawyer. Anything else is irresponsible.


8

You can't gain administrator rights on a system with UAC without passing through UAC elevation. Your options are: Manifest your app so that it always runs as administrator. The user sees the UAC dialog every time they start the app. Separate the part of the app that needs admin rights into a separate process and just require elevation for that part. ...


7

Simply put, no, there isn't. Any content that can be viewed can be copied. There's no exception to this at all, unless you can bend the laws of physics in your favor :)


7

The reason you can't stop DRM no matter what is as follows: imagine a bank vault. There has to be a way in to get the money out. If there is a way in, that means someone could get in that way, therefore it is not impenetrable. If the vault is impenetrable, that means no one can get in -- meaning no one can get the money in or out, not even the people who ...


7

I don't see it as a matter of ethics, but it's certainly not very friendly or convenient to stop a user from changing their password. If you consider it your professional ethical responsibility to make usable software, then I suppose it's unethical. Perhaps your "ethical" angle is coming from the idea of being ethically obliged to create secure software. ...


7

Long answer: Only let users browse your site by visiting your office and using a machine located there - under strict supervision, of course. Short answer: No.


7

Yes. The GNU compiler license allows you to do whatever you want with the code you're compiling and the resulting binary.


7

There is no easy way to do this. One approach would be political: institute code reviews, perhaps with automated searches of the code base, and just slap wrists when people do this. The architectural approach would be similar to your three schema structure, but with a subtle twist: the schema in the middle uses views. So, schema ABC owns tables and ...


6

To finish the process you must call DirectoryInfo.SetAccessControl() with the modified ACL. GetAccessControl() really returns a copy of the ACL. You're free to modify it but it won't take effect until you call SetAccessControl()


6

Games that have existed for centuries/millennia are in the public domain, since they were either invented before the modern system of copyright or their copyright has expired. They require no permission from anyone to implement, build, and/or sell.


5

I would suggest that it has more to do with usability. What happens when the user forgets their password? Or what if their password is compromised? Do you really want them to have to directly contact someone from your company to get it changed?


5

Do you really need to throw an error? Or do you simply need to verify that the application is not using fully qualified names (i.e. ABC.TRN)? Assuming that you're merely interested in verifying that the application is not using fully qualified names and that throwing the error was merely the mechanism you thought of to notify you, you can probably verify ...


5

A group is a means of organising users, whereas a role is usually a means of organising rights. This can be useful in a number of ways. For example, a set of permissions grouped into a role could be assigned to a set of groups, or a set of users independently of their group. For example, a CMS might have some permissions like Read post, Create post, Edit ...


5

Specifically check the permissions on app/etc/local.xml as usually this means it is world readable. Also, there is supposed to be a .htaccess file in app/etc/ that denies the contents from being served out by the web server. Check just in case your tar backup didn't include it. Usually this problem comes about from using an FTP client to do the transfer ...


4

At one point you will have to abandon whatever coding/encrypting you are using to circumvent the making of illegal copies and show the content to the user in plain sight. The latest, at that point the user can simply capture the content and make copies. Which means that if you cannot control who your users are (or how they are using your technology), you ...


4

I think unethical would be a good term. If you don't have a way for them to change it, there is no way to stop someone from having unauthorized access to their information if their password gets comprimised. Now you can say that your system is secure, but that really is only part of the problem. A lot of people use the same password for multiple sites. ...


4

Important note: never trust legal advice you obtain online. If you're concerned, you need to speak to an attorney. Are you asking, for example, whether you have the right to delete or block posts that you don't like, or whether you can ban users you object to? Of course you can, it seems to me; it's your site. A more pressing question is whether you bear ...


4

Put together Terms of Use, and spell out the user rights. Here is a template that you may find useful: http://ownterms.pbworks.com/Terms+of+Use+1 Have a lawyer review the document to ensure that it would hold up in court.


4

The biggest issue I have with GAE is that exporting data is very difficult. Therefore, it is difficult to migrate from Google App Engine once you have already started with it. Keep this in mind as you start to break quota levels and have to pay for usage. Otherwise, Google has no ownership of your web application, and you shouldn't be afraid of launching on ...


4

Check out RoleHierarchy and RoleHierarchyImpl and this question.


4

Although there is semantic difference between Roles and Groups (as described above by other answers), tecnically Roles and Groups seems to be the same. Nothing prevents you to assign Permissions directly to Users and Groups (this can be considered as a fine-tunig access control). Equivalently, when User is assigned a Role, it can be considered a role ...


3

Right now I can see 12 answers all agreeing that the answer is "No". If your business relies on your clients' media being published with protection, then your business may already be in trouble. You need to start a conversation with your clients about the content they're generating, why they're generating it and what they hope to get from it. It rather ...


3

it is not ok. you are responsible to collaborate with users regarding safety. when their password is compromised or they choosed an unsafe password and want a safe one now, they need the ability to change it (or request a new one) when you feel you are not responsible for this, why should any user trust you? so you would betray them (because you got them ...


3

The main thing you need to identify is the level of user you wish to prevent from copying the content. You will never stop a 1337 h4xx0r from copying your things and passing any knowledge of hacks to more competent techies. As you wander down the line of the less technical able there is more you can do (such as the usual DRM) to dissuade them from ...



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