Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

39

You could use the super-short: s.replace(/[a-zA-Z]/g,function(c){return String.fromCharCode((c<="Z"?90:122)>=(c=c.charCodeAt(0)+13)?c:c-26);});


38

Because it has the nice property of being involutive, that is to say, ROT13(ROT13(alphaOnlyString)) = alphaOnlyString.


14

At the risk of downvotes, this is not something you should be doing. The "Recently Used Programs" belongs to the owner of the computer, not your program. If your program is as useful as you think it is, it will automagically show up there. Raymond Chen has done quite a few articles as to why this sort of thing is a bad idea. This rates among all those ...


12

According to Wikipedia: A shift of thirteen was chosen over other values, such as three as in the original Caesar cipher, because thirteen is the value for which encoding and decoding are equivalent, thereby allowing the convenience of a single command for both.


12

I don't think it's part of Java by default, but here's an example of how you can implement it; public class Rot13 { public static void main(String[] args) { String s = args[0]; for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) { char c = s.charAt(i); if (c >= 'a' && c <= 'm') c += 13; else ...


10

Might as well contribute my function to save other developers the valuable seconds public static String rot13(String input) { StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); for (int i = 0; i < input.length(); i++) { char c = input.charAt(i); if (c >= 'a' && c <= 'm') c += 13; else if (c >= 'A' && c ...


10

What about this? I just happen to have this code lying around, it isn't pretty, but it does the job. Just to make sure: One liners are fun, but they usually do not improve readability and code maintainability... So I'd stick to your own solution :) static string ROT13(string input) { return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(input) ? new string ...


9

The nice thing about rot13 is that it's reflective. applying rot 13 twice (e.g. rot 26) brings you right back to where you came from.


8

Are you perhaps calling rot13() with a (pointer to a) string literal as the actual argument? String literals are read-only in C. Try something along char foo[] = "YOUR STRING TO BE ROT13'D IN-PLACE."; rot13 (foo);


8

This gives correct results. function rot13(s) { return (s ? s : this).split('').map(function(_) { if (!_.match(/[A-za-z]/)) return _; c = Math.floor(_.charCodeAt(0) / 97); k = (_.toLowerCase().charCodeAt(0) - 83) % 26 || 26; return String.fromCharCode(k + ((c == 0) ? 64 : 96)); }).join(''); }


7

Try str_rot13. http://us.php.net/manual/en/function.str-rot13.php No need to make your own, it's built-in.


7

ROT13 is used in parts of the Windows registry. The usual reason for using something like ROT13 is search. For whatever reason, they didn’t want some registry keys to show up when you did a search for “notepad.exe” or “Program Files” in the registry. So they ROT13ed them.


7

Probably cause it is its own inverse. The same algorithm can be used for "encryption" as well as "decryption".


7

Because shifting by 13 moves the characters half way around the alphabet (which has 26 places). So, to get back to plaintext you only need to shift it 13 moves again. This way, you don't have to have separate functions for encoding or decoding because the same operation will be encode or decode.


7

The g? command (type :help g? for brief documentation) implements the rot13 algorithm, which rotates each letter 13 places forward or backward in the alphabet. I'm not sure how commonly it's used today, but on Usenet it used to be a common way to encode spoilers. For example, if I'm writing a post that gives away the ending of something that not everyone ...


5

It is a "secret" code transforming 'A..M' to 'N..Z' and vice versa. Since the English alphabet uses 26 letters, rotating by 13 is its own inverse. 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12-13 A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J -K -L -M N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W -X -Y -Z Although such an encoding is obvious to decode, it has a history on the early internet of being used to obscure the ...


5

You don't reverse the signs. The decoding method is identical to the encoding method. For example : 'a' is encoded to 'n'. If you "encode" the 'n', it is decoded back to 'a'.


5

var rot13 = String.prototype.rot13 = function(s) { return (s = (s) ? s : this).split('').map(function(_) { if (!_.match(/[A-Za-z]/)) return _; c = _.charCodeAt(0)>=96; k = (_.toLowerCase().charCodeAt(0) - 96 + 12) % 26 + 1; return String.fromCharCode(k + (c ? 96 : 64)); } ).join(''); }; ...


5

Aha! I thought it had been dropped from Python 3, but no - it is just that the interface has changed, because a codec has to return bytes (and this is str-to-str). This is from http://www.wefearchange.org/2012/01/python-3-porting-fun-redux.html : import codecs s = "hello" enc = codecs.getencoder( "rot-13" ) os = enc( s )[0]


4

sizeof() in encrypt will not behave as you want it to. Inside encrypt, the sizeof(char *) is 4(on a 32bit machine) or 8(on a 64 bit machine), which you can see is the size of a pointer. To get the sizeof(input) you must change sizeof to strlen. Hence solution = strlen(input) Why this happens?? when you pass an array into a function, that array is ...


4

Either exclude one of the symbols in the alphabet from the cipher, or supplement it with a symbol not in the alphabet.


4

In your code : if ((str[i] >= 32) && (str[i] <= 255)) { if (str[i] + key > 255) str[i] = ((str[i] + key) % 255 )+ 32; else str[i] += key; } if key has a value of 13 and str[i] is 'u' or greater, str[i] has a value higher than 255. You should use modulo % operator in ...


4

Not really a one liner but still shorter than your original code and more understandable than the other answer: static string Rot13(string input) { if(input == null) return null; Tuple<int, int>[] ranges = { Tuple.Create(65, 90), Tuple.Create(97, 122) }; var chars = input.Select(x => { var range = ...


4

In Python 3.2+, there is rot_13 str-to-str codec: import codecs print(codecs.encode("hello", "rot-13")) # -> uryyb


4

The problem in your code is you are not manipulating the original string. You are just replacing the temporary variable char and not in the original string. Since strings are immutable in python, you may try using a new string and instead of replacing the original string, you may just append the characters to the new string. Like: modified_string = "" for ...


4

You need only one of the if statements to execute, so make sure you have the second two in else clauses: if(x==32) // keep spaces { cryptStr = cryptStr + (char)x; } else if((x>=65) && (x<=77)) // rotate 'A' through 'M' by +13 { x=x+13; cryptStr = cryptStr + (char)x; } else if((x>77) && (x<=90)) // ...


4

Because str.replace() replaces all instances of that character, even ones you've already replaced. Generate a new string from the replacements instead of modifying the existing string.


4

Kevin M's solution is compact and elegant. It's got one tiny error, though: the regular expression used with the replace function doesn't limit substitution to alphabetic characters. The [A-z] character range includes punctuation characters ([\] ^ _ `), which will be swapped for letters when they should be left alone. The fixed version looks like this: ...


3

The rot13 function is not part of standard JavaScript. it is most likely a function provided by a library the page is using.


3

input has type char* (read as "pointer to char"). sizeof(input) gives you the size of the pointer. You probably want to use strlen to find the length of the string, or pass the length in to the function as an additional argument.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible