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15

Yaw, pitch and roll correspond to Euler angles. You can convert a transformation matrix to Euler angles pretty easily:


6

You need to walk down the tree and multiply each matrix along the way, from the scene root to the final object. The resulting matrix will be the absolute transforms.


6

Here's a simple function to do definite integrals of polynomials polyIntegrate[expr_List, {x_, x0_, x1_}] := polyIntegrate[#, {x, x0, x1}]&/@expr polyIntegrate[expr_, {x_, x0_, x1_}] := Check[Total[# Table[(x1^(1 + n) - x0^(1 + n))/(1 + n), {n, 0, Length[#] - 1}] ]&[CoefficientList[expr, x]], $Failed, {General::poly}] On its range of ...


5

Initially I knew nothing about what formats OpenCV uses. So some research first. Looking at the documentation for solvePnP, it appears like its returning a matrix. The Rodrigues2 function mentioned there appears to be called Rodrigues these days. The description there indicates that you can expect a matrix with either a single row or a single column. The ...


5

GAH! Don't do that: glPushMatrix(); glLoadIdentity(); glRotatef(-planetRotation.z, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0); glRotatef(-planetRotation.y, 0.0, 1.0, 0.0); glRotatef(-planetRotation.x, 1.0, 0.0, 0.0); GLfloat rotMatrix[16]; glGetFloatv(GL_MODELVIEW_MATRIX, rotMatrix); glPopMatrix(); OpenGL is not a math library. There are proper linear algebra ...


4

Using CMDeviceMotion, you can get a CMAttitude object with "roll, pitch and yaw" - where for example, given a phone held in portrait mode "yaw" is "azimuth", "pitch" is the tilt of the phone with respect to ground, or zenith, and "roll" is about the vector pointing through the screen and not what you're interested in. Things get a bit tricky because ...


4

This has come up before here. Updated working fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/CBAyS/21/ The trick is to add a second scene with a second camera, which has the same orientation as the original camera, but maintains a specified distance from the origin. camera2.position.copy( camera.position ); camera2.position.sub( controls.target ); ...


4

What you are trying to accomplish is not as easy as you might think. There are multiple conventions as to what the euler angles are called (x,y,z,alpha,beta,gamma,yaw,pitch,roll,heading,elevation,bank,...) and in which order they need to be applied. The are also some problems with ambiguities in certain positions, see Wikpedia article on Gimbal Lock. ...


3

As a rule of thumb in numerical calculations -- only take the first 12 digits seriously :) Now, assuming 3D rotations, and that outcomes of trig functions are infinitely precise, a matrix multiplication will involve 3 multiplications and 2 additions per element in the rotated vector. Since you do two rotations, this amounts to 6 multiplications and 4 ...


3

You have to save previous rot value. And add check in updateRotation method if previousRot is at the left of 360' degrees and rot is at the right of 360' degrees then we made 1 round and need stop rotating. Sample code for clockwise case if (previousRot >= 300 && previousRot <= 360 && rot >= 0 && rot <= 60) { rot = ...


3

RotMatrix=R(yaw)*R(pitch)*R(roll) to eliminate yaw factor, we can left-multiply this matrix on negative yaw matrix RotMatrixNew=R(-yaw)*R(yaw)*R(pitch)*R(roll) = I**R*(pitch)*R(roll) = R(pitch)*R(roll) If yaw angle isn't known before, then it could be calculated as yaw = ArcTan2(RotMatrix[2][1], RotMatrix[1][1])


3

Orientation is not a rotation matrix as it only provides you angles related to magnetic North. You can obtain the rotation matrix (Direction Cosine Matrix) that will help you to transform coordinates from your device frame to the Earth's frame this way : with = azimuth (radians) = pitch (radians) = roll (radians)


3

I know this is old, but allow me a guess anyway. The problem is exactly what you said yourself: When ever I "roll" the camera, it seems to roll around the global Z axis instead of the local camera direction axis. It does so because you asked it to roll around vector (0,0,1), that is, the global Z axis. This is what unit quaternions do: they rotate a ...


3

As I commented above, the fastest method strongly depends on the properties of your matrices. For example, some algorithm can strongly benefit from the matrix being symmetric, but is rather slow if it is not. So without further information, I can only make some general statements, and compare some methods on random matrices (which usually does not give a ...


3

You have to translate the entire system so that the center of the rotation is the center of the system. The equations used for rotation that you use work only if rotating around the origin. For the translation you can also multiply with a matrix having the direction of translation as the last row. Anyway, the entire transformation is P' = inv(T) * R * T * ...


3

I don't use Eigen and didn't bother to look up the API but here is a simple, computationally cheap and stable procedure to re-orthogonalize the rotation matrix. This orthogonalization procedure is taken from Direction Cosine Matrix IMU: Theory by William Premerlani and Paul Bizard; equations 19-21. Let x, y and z be the row vectors of the (slightly ...


3

You can use a QR decomposition to systematically re-orthogonalize, where you replace the original matrix with the Q factor. In the library routines you have to check and correct, if necessary, by negating the corresponding column in Q, that the diagonal entries of R are positive (close to 1 if the original matrix was close to orthogonal). The closest ...


3

Not sure if this will be mathematical enough for your taste, but I'll give it a shot anyway: The problem with a rotation matrix is that it contains redundant information. You have 9 values that encode a transformation with only 3 degrees of freedom. Due to this redundancy, there are constraints on the 9 values in a matrix to form a valid rotation matrix. ...


2

Let U = (B-A)/||(B-A) be a unit vector along the line from A to B, where ||X|| denotes the length of vector X. Now we can parameterize the entire line by A + tU and we want ((A + tU) - C)*U = 0 so that A*U - C*U + t = 0 t = C*U - A*U so we've solved for t, and now we let V = (A+tU - C)/||A+tU - C|| and we have our unit vector along the line, ...


2

I have used your demo and added some logic, the newer demo is as below: public class RotateRoundActivity extends Activity implements OnTouchListener { float rot1=0.0F, rot2=0.0F; boolean clockwise, rotationDone = false, halfrotated = false; int rotcall=0; private ImageView dialer; //private float y=0; private int x=0; //private ...


2

I believe getRotationMatrix() returns a rotation matrix that converts device coordinate to world coordinate, as mentioned in android documentation, not "world" to "device". Computes the inclination matrix I as well as the rotation matrix R transforming a vector from the device coordinate system to the world's coordinate system which is defined as a ...


2

Here is an easier solution, since you already have the 3x3 rotation matrices R1 and R2, and the 3x1 translation vectors t1 and t2. These express the motion from the world coordinate frame to each camera, i.e. are the matrices such that, if p is a point expressed in world coordinate frame, then the same point expressed in, say, camera 1 frame is p1 = R1 * p ...


2

You left the scale argument out of the call to vector.getRotationFromMatrix( matrix, scale ). Also, it's best not to mess with the object matrix -- unless you really know what you are doing. Instead just set the object's rotation, position, and scale, and let the library update the matrix. In your case you were overwriting the object's matrix, but by luck, ...


2

The math of your transform is not correct. You should apply the perspective transform after the rotation transform, which means concatenating both transforms. Changing the m34 coefficient of your rotation transform is not equivalent. You should replace your code by the following : -(void)setSelected:(bool)s { selected=s; CATransform3D ...


2

(This is really an extended comment, with code) There is definitely a byte order problem here. I ran the following: public class Test { public static void main(String[] args) { float f = (float)4.6006E-41; System.out.println(Integer.toHexString(Float.floatToIntBits(f))); } } and got output 803f Float 1.0 is big-endian 0x3f800000.


2

You're doing the multiplications in the wrong order. For two rotations q1 and q2, if q2 is to follow q1 (since rotations are generally non-communitive) you multiply q2*q1. In a gimbal style system such as controls for a FPS, the priority order is always yaw, pitch, roll. This would suggest the following math: roll * pitch * yaw As a java point, I would ...


2

Normally, trig functions expect their arguments to be in radians, not degrees. 2*pi radians = 360 degrees.


2

If you define camera base vectors C-center, L-look at, U-up such that C is the camera center, L is the normalized vector from center towards the point you are looking at and U is up normalized. Now you can rotate the L vector left and right by rotating it around U by any angle. As for moving left and right you will have to reconstruct side vector S: a ...


2

I think this will help... Android Compass that can Compensate for Tilt and Pitch This calculates North using more reliable sources. Hope this helps.


2

You need to vectorize the operation, i.e. run it on the whole set of particles instead of looping over them. Assuming that xA etc. are 1-d arrays, that's something like: particles = np.vstack([xA, xB, xC]) rot = rotation_matrix(axis, angle) rotated = np.dot(rot, particles) xA, yA, zA = rotated This should give you several orders of magnitude speedup. On a ...



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