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8

> import Text.Printf > printf "%.2f" 0.22324 :: String "0.22" You can use most format strings C's printf supports. Keep in mind, however, that Haskell's printf involves some complex typeclass machinery, and can generate hard-to-read type errors. It is also very general, since it can also return IO actions, i.e. > printf "%.2f" 0.22324 :: IO () ...


7

printf is solid, and another library worth knowing about is formatting (which is based off of the lovely HoleyMonoid library): Prelude Formatting> format ("to two decimal places: " % prec 2 % "!") 0.2222 "to two decimal places: 0.22!" Note that formatting is type-safe, unlike printf: Prelude Text.Printf Formatting> :t printf "%.2f" "hi" printf ...


6

We rewrote the floating point parser and formatter for the Universal CRT and Visual C++ 2015 to improve correctness. See the Breaking Changes in Visual C++ documentation for Visual C++ 2015; there is a section entitled "Floating point formatting and parsing." The Visual C++ 2015 result is the correctly rounded result. The input string 0.182696884245135 is ...


6

You can multiply the value by 4 then floor it then divide by 4. public static double quarterRound(double v){ return Math.floor(v*4)/4; }


5

Try changing the float rounding mode to FE_TOWARDZERO. See code example here: Change floating point rounding mode


4

While its name might be slightly misleading, std::numeric_limits<T>::min is what you're looking for. For floating point types, it will give you the smallest value greater than zero. For the greatest number that's still less than 1, you can use std::nexttoward if you use C++11: Code #include<cstdio> #include<cmath> #include<limits> ...


4

You should explicitly specify the precision of your number using NumberMarks: ToString[NumberForm[0.0000012345678912345678`17, Infinity, ExponentFunction -> (Null &)]] "0.0000012345678912345678" The reason of the problem is that your number is interpreted as a MachinePrecision number. If you simply add one zero to the end of this number the ...


4

The technical aspect: std::pow is not defined for int, only for double and float. Therefor you cannot rely on it returning the exact int value. You have to expect rounding errors. The algorithm aspect: Calculating the n-th power using the naive algorithm (n multplications) obviously takes linear time. To improve performance for large powers, most ...


3

The decimal module allows precise control over rounding and it can retain trailing zeros: >>> Decimal('1.695').quantize(Decimal('.01'), rounding=ROUND_HALF_UP) Decimal('1.70')


3

Welcome to one of the syntactic quirks of VB. This line: Dim sales, comm, conj As Long Means only conj is Long. The first two are of type Variant. You can try this: Dim sales as Long, comm as Long, conj as Long


3

You need to round to quarters so: Multiply by 4 Floor to next int Divide by 4 Note that if you reliable values it is better to works with BigDecimal instead of primitive values (double or float). The algorithm stay the same.


3

You can use DecimalFormat, just set the RoundingMode: DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.###"); df.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.FLOOR); String num = df.format(celcius);


2

From your current description, it sounds like all you really want to do is offset the rounding: var foo = function foo (n) {return Math.round(n + 0.5) - 0.5;}


2

This will do what you want... BigDecimal a=new BigDecimal("2.5"); BigDecimal b=new BigDecimal("0.5"); System.out.println(Math.round(a.doubleValue())); System.out.println(Math.round(b.doubleValue())); This will give you output as 3 and 1 ...


2

You can have a little fun with logarithms to solve this: func roundFirst(x:Double) -> Double { if x == 0 { return x; } let mul : Double = pow(10, floor(log10(abs(x)))) return round(x/mul)*mul } The non-fractional part of log10(abs(x)) gives you a positive or negative power of ten of the inverse of the number which you use as ...


2

The rounding rules for CASTs depend on a global setting, RoundHalfwayMagUp in dbscontrol. You might try the ROUND function which defaults to the rounding rules you prefer: ROUND(36.425,2)


2

For me this is working as expected. round(82.599899); //returns 83 round(82.599899, 2); //returns 82.60 round(28.4772, 2); //returns 28.48 So I guess that this is a config problem. Did you changed something in your php.ini? Maybe the precision field is changed from the default one.


2

Multiply celsius by 1000 to move the decimal over 3 spots celsius = celsius * 1000; Now floor the number and divide by 1000 celsius = Math.floor(celsius) / 1000; It will remove the need for the String.format() method.


2

Might be easier to have a fixed width instead and pad the text on the left and right. Sub DisplayText(ByVal text As String) Const WIDTH As Integer = 72 Const DISPLAY_CHAR As String = "="c Console.WriteLine("".PadLeft(WIDTH, DISPLAY_CHAR)) Console.WriteLine(text.PadLeft((WIDTH + text.Length) / 2, DISPLAY_CHAR).PadRight(WIDTH, DISPLAY_CHAR)) ...


2

I think you are looking for either CEILING() or floor() function like select CEILING(25.227) //results in 26 (OR) select FLOOR(25.227) //Results in 25 EDIT: for ex: for value 25.22789 result should be 25.22 You can try like below select round(25.22789, 2, 2) Which will result in 25.22000


2

Use third parameter of ROUND() function to truncate and then CONVERT() it to DECIMAL(x, 2) to get rid of unwanted trailing zeros. Fiddle demo SELECT CONVERT(DECIMAL(10,2), ROUND(25.227, 2, 1)) RoundDown, CONVERT(DECIMAL(10,2), ROUND(25.227, 2, 0)) RoundUp Results | RoundDown | RoundUp | |-----------|---------| | 25.22 | 25.23 |


2

I have seen the posts about -lm and a certain file but if I am honest I don't understand what it means. You have to link to the math library to fix the error. Math functions implementations are usually put as a separate library, the math library. If you use gcc add -lm to the linker command.


1

The solution of paxdiablo can be a little bit improved. def roundPartial (value, resolution): return round (value /float(resolution)) * resolution so the function is now: "data-type sensitive".


1

double round(double d, int n) { double last = d * pow(10, n + 1); int last_dig = floor(last) % 10; if (last_dig != 5) return reg_round(d, n); //round as normal double pre_last = d * pow(10, n); int pre_last_dig = floor(pre_last) % 10; if (pre_last_dig %2 == 0) return floor(d,n); //last digit is even, floor. else ...


1

Vs2008 was using 80bit floating point literals and was rounding this more precise value when converting to a double. Vs2015 doesn't do this and merely truncates the literal. I believe you can toggle between the two schemes by changing the compiler settings.


1

You can use DecimalFormat, I am not sure about the other numbers but currently you have numbers which have single digit before the decimal point. So, check following example where you can format the double value. Note one more thing that you may need to change format pattern for your use case. FOR EXAMPLE : double d = 3.7578845854848E41; double d2 = ...


1

I found an old post on a forum here which states that the RoundHalfwayMagUp controls whether .5 rounds up or down. See the docs for more info


1

As you already mentioned, this is not possible in every case. Usually, when the total price is really the product of the single item price and a quantity, the resulting double will have enough precision to do this calculation. But generally you have to store both prices. I implemented a whole ERP, and we also have a feature where the user can specify the ...


1

You haven't specified what happened when x = 1.002341 for examples. Base on your limited cases you can use this: func myRound (var number : Double) -> Double { if number == 0 { return number } let integerPart = floor(number) var base = 1.0 number -= integerPart while abs(number) < 1 { number *= 10.0 ...


1

double value = 12.3464367843; double rounded = (double) Math.round(value * 1000000) / 1000000; output:12.346437



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