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0

One way to achieve such a rounding only if necessary is to use the string formatting function: myNumber.toLocaleString('en', {maximumFractionDigits:2, useGrouping:false}) This will provide exactly the output you expect, but as strings. You can still convert those back to numbers if that's not the output type you expect.


0

Here is a simple way to do it: float numberToRound = 1.12345f; float remainder = numberToRound*1000.0f - (float)((int)(numberToRound*1000.0f)); if (remainder >= 0.5f) { numberToRound = (float)((int)(numberToRound*1000.0f) + 1)/1000.0f; } else { numberToRound = (float)((int)(numberToRound*1000.0f))/1000.0f; } For an arbitrary decimal place, ...


0

What you're talking about here is a display issue. The "0" in the 1.0 shows how accurate the number is, if you are only displaying 1 then the person reading does not know how accurate that value is (compared with 1.1, 1.9 or even 1.0003). My suggestion would be to convert your answer to a string and check if the last value is "0", and if so remove it for ...


2

You can create a helper function like this static public void Normalize(String pattern, double value ) { DecimalFormat formatter = new DecimalFormat(pattern); String normalizedValue = formatter.format(value); System.out.println(normalizedValue); } Normalize("0.#####",2.40); // 2.4 Normalize("0.#####",2.0); // 2 This worked for me.


2

The number column in the Testing database table apparently has an integer data type. You can check the data type by querying EXPLAIN Testing. If it has an integer data type, the number value is coerced to an integer before it stored in the table. If you wish to store a decimal then you'll need to alter the table first: ALTER TABLE `Testing` CHANGE ...


0

A generic solution - Use MOD to find the last 100th place and then add 100 to the result. select (720 - MOD(720,100)) + 100 from dual; If you need the next 80th place, just replace any "100" with "80".


0

Threw together a quick custom filter and dropped the ngCurrency library. <input type="number" maxlength="12" ng-currency ng-model="myValue" /> {{myValue | myCurrency:myValue | currency:'$':0}} currencyModule.filter('myCurrency', function () { return function (myValue) { if (myValue > 999999){ myValue = 999999; } ...


1

From your plunker I see you are mixing versions: From https://github.com/aguirrel/ng-currency#versions Versions If you use angular 1.2.x please, use 0.7.x version. If you use angular 1.3.x or above just use 0.8.x version instead. Please, use https://rawgit.com/aguirrel/ng-currency/v0.8.x/src/ng-currency.js instead of uploaded ng-currency.js in ...


0

you can cast to number with 2 decimal after round up in query, or when you display at report or system DECLARE @i int = 2 BEGIN SELECT cast( ROUND(val,@i) as decimal(10,2) ) FROM mytable END


0

You can just use the ROUND function for sql-server DECLARE @i int = 2 BEGIN SELECT ROUND(val,@i) FROM mytable END SQLFIDDLE


0

There's no overload for double? in Math.Round so you need to pass a double as parameter. Also you need to consider the case when your double? is null. Finally, you need to cast the result of Math.Round to double?. double? budget = item.Budget; double? myPrice = budget / count; double? roundMyPrice = myPrice.HasValue ? (double?) Math.Round(myPrice.Value, ...


1

double? (or Nullable<double>) can be null, remember it. Variant 1 double? myPrice = budget / count; double roundMyPrice; if (myPrice.HasValue) { roundMyPrice = Math.Round(myPrice.Value, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero); } else { // value is not presented } Variant 2 MSDN: GetValueOrDefault If null is 0 by your logic, you can use this code: ...


0

function formatNumber(x) { // convert it to a string var s = "" + x; // if x is integer, the point is missing, so add it if (s.indexOf(".") == -1) { s += "."; } // make sure if we have at least 2 decimals s += "00"; // get the first 2 decimals return s.substring(0, s.indexOf(".") + 3); } document.write(1 + " -> " + ...


0

27/10 will give result as 2 without any func. select 27/10::numeric ,27/10::real , 27/10 as the_result_you_need


2

trunc function will truncate number to given number of decimals: select trunc(2.7, 0); trunc ------- 2 (1 row)


0

So I figured it out after scratching my head for awhile. I had to move my REPLACE function inside the CASE WHEN to get the CONVERT to work. Select CONVERT(decimal(18,2),ROUND(CASE WHEN ISNUMERIC(VALUE) = 1 THEN ISNULL(CONVERT(numeric,replace(value, ',','')),0)*PCT_CMPT/100 ELSE 0 END,2)) as Earned


3

You are correct, round is the wrong tool for this job. Instead, you should use floor and ceiling. Unfortunately, they do not have a precision parameter like round, so you'd have to simulate it using division and multiplication: SELECT FLOOR(value * 100) / 100 AS rounded_down, CEILING(value * 100) / 100 AS rounded_up FROM mytable


1

Please look more carefully at your output, for example: 05-17 12:00:43.625 24610-24610/package I/System.out﹕ Speed: 7.026718463748694E-4 doesn't mean you have 7.02, but 0.000702. There is E-4 at the end. When you would use ceil it will always return 1.


4

In all the outputs you printed (except the first one which is 0) Speed is smaller than 1 (7.026718463748694E-4, 5.27003884781152E-4, etc...). Notice the negative exponent. Therefore it's no wonder ceil returns 1.


0

<script> var num = 0.1464676; console.log(num.toFixed(2)); </script> <p>toFixed(2) here 2 is number of digits upto which we want to round this num.</p>


1

Try these com.androidhub4you.crop.RoundedImageView imageViewRound =(com.androidhub4you.crop.RoundedImageView) parentView.findViewById(R.id.imageView_round);


0

Try the following code: function toFixed(value, precision) { var precision = precision || 0, power = Math.pow(10, precision), absValue = Math.abs(Math.round(value * power)), result = (value < 0 ? '-' : '') + String(Math.floor(absValue / power)); if (precision > 0) { var fraction = String(absValue % power), padding = new ...


1

Two things: You're playing with fire by using implicit type conversion. element.value returns a string, not a number, so you should be using parseInt() or parseFloat() to convert your values to numbers. For instance, if your input has value 3, and you do element.value + 2, the result is 32. Second, to your question, Math.ceil() rounds a float up to the ...


0

Use round() method to rounds a number to the nearest integer. Example: var a = Math.round(8.70); Answer a = 9;


0

mround takes time values as strings, so you can use =mround(a1,"0:15") which I think is the shortest and clearest method.


2

If you overwrite the standard format with #.00 you have no grouping seperator in your format. For your expected case you have to include the grouping seperator again into your custom format: DecimalFormat theFormatter = new DecimalFormat("#,###.00", theSymbols); The pattern definition symbols can be found in the Doc


0

The _invoicingCurrencyProfitAmount = Decimal.Parse(profitAmount.ToString("0.####")) line is returning a decimal. Decimal does keep all zeroes, the problem is 100% in where are you printing the value. If you are trying to write this in Console Console.Writeline("{0:F4}", _invoicingCurrencyProfitAmount); where {0:F4} means "Format as fixed-point", with ...


-2

var d = 425.1382.ToString("0.##") + "00"; // "425.1400"


-1

var _profitAmount = Math.Round((saleMarginValue * exchangeRate), 4); _invoicingCurrencyProfitAmount = Decimal.Parse(profitAmount.ToString().PadRight(2,'0'));


3

When you convert to a numeric type you give up all unnecessary digits. You need to convert the Decimal to a String before displaying.


5

COBOL does no rounding, unless you tell it to. What it does do, if you don't tell it to do rounding, is low-order truncation. Some people may prefer to term that something else, it doesn't really matter, the effect is the same. Truncation. Negative values are dealt with in the same way as positive values (retain a significant digit beyond what is required ...


0

One picture is worth a thousand words.


0

As seen in the python documentation of the function round() it states "rounded to ndigits digits after the decimal point". So it means the result will be rounded to two digits after the decimal point.


5

From the docs: if two multiples are equally close, rounding is done toward the even choice So when you say rounding up, it's not necessarily rounding up. It's just rounding.


0

As for ROUND_05UP it seems to have been added just to conform to some old standard and have no or little practical application (in particular, it is the only python rounding method that is missing from the Wikipedia article on rounding).


0

This type of rounding you are talking about is called Swedish rounding: 1 cent rounds down to 0 2 cents round down to 0 3 cents round up to 5 cents 4 cents round up to 5 cents and so on. from decimal import Decimal as D, ROUND_HALF_EVEN # or ROUND_HALF_UP def round_to_5_cents(d): """ Round a Decimal value to the nearest multiple of 0.05, ...


2

Why not use something like this: Math.round(yourNumber * 100) / 100; This will round it to two decimal places, the same question was more or less answered here - Round to at most 2 decimal places in JavaScript Here is a small example function round(num){ var result = Math.round(num * 100) / 100; return console.log(result); } round(0.4284); ...


1

By using modulus: int x = 1500; int result = x % 1000 >= 500 ? x + 1000 - x % 1000 : x - x % 1000; It checks if x has any more than 499 when the thousands are stripped, and then rounds it.


1

It's worth noting that Excel has built-in functions for working with multiples: CEILING and FLOOR (in newer versions you have CEILING.MATH and FLOOR.MATH). In your case, this should work: =CEILING(A1,20)-A1


0

You want to divide it by 20, round it up and multiply it by 20, the rest is trivial. =-(A1-ROUNDUP(A1/20,0)*20)


0

it does not work on a data.frame because R cannot round different rows with different digits. You therefore have to select a number in the variable that you want to apply your function on, e.g. the maximum, like so: myfun = function(val) { cutvec = 10^(-7:2) cutvec = cutvec[!cutvec == 1] rounding = 8:0 find.round = rounding[max(which(val > ...


2

You probably want signif which rounds off to a given number of significant digits. x <- runif(16) * 10^(7*runif(16)-5) cbind(x, mx = my.func(x), sx = signif(x, 3)) x mx sx [1,] 1.395044e-01 1.40e-01 1.40e-01 [2,] 9.751368e-06 9.80e-06 9.75e-06 [3,] 3.451619e-04 3.50e-04 3.45e-04 [4,] 2.203204e-03 2.20e-03 2.20e-03 ...


1

If you're willing to process these values as strings, you can use a few parameter expansions: $ cat x 0.0008234535225 0.00547889294 0.000003243322 0.00012034 $ for line in $(<x); do > exp="${line%%[^0.]*}" mant="${line#$exp}" > echo "${exp}${mant:0:1}" > done 0.0008 0.005 0.000003 0.0001


4

The following will truncate your numbers to the first non 0 digit: grep -o "0.0*." <<< "$NUMBER" For example: grep -o "0.0*." <<< "0.000003243322" Prints: 0.000003


0

You can show one decimal point without having to use another operator like round or math.ceil. (In python 2.7 this would be) '%.1f' % (5.34) Here are some quirks of using the round function that you should be aware of : round() in Python doesn't seem to be rounding properly


4

Floating-point numbers don't have decimal places. They have binary places, and the two are not commensurable. Any attempt to modify a floating-point variable to have a specific number of decimal places is doomed to failure. You have to do the rounding to a specified number of decimal places after conversion to a decimal radix.


0

There are a different ways to round numbers. The RoundingMode documentation for Java (introduced in 1.5) should give you a brief introduction to the different methods people use. I know you said you don't have access to the Math functions, but the simplest rounding you can do is: public static double round(double d) { return Math.floor(d + 0.5); } If ...


0

import math def main(): for ct in range (0, 21): fe = 9 / 5 * (ct) + 32 print(ct, "Celsius equals", (math.ceil(fe*100)/100) , "Fahrenheit") This might work.


1

print("%d Celsius equals %.1f Fahrenheit" % (ct, fe)) # => 13 Celsius equals 55.4 Fahrenheit


0

It looks like you might be using Python. To format your code, put four blank spaces before each line so that it is more readable, like this: def main(): for ct in range (0, 21): fe = 9 / 5 * (ct) + 32 print (ct, "Celsius equals", fe, "Fahrenheit") If you want to round your answer, use Python's round() function. This would make your ...



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