Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

74

I often do binary rpm per packaging proprietary apps - also moster as websphere - on linux. So my experience could be useful also a you, besides that it would better to do a TRUE RPM if you can. But i digress. So the a basic step for packaging your (binary) program is as follow - in which i suppose the program is toybinprog with version 1.0, have a conf to ...


44

It's not documented, but the _topdir macro determines the build area. So you can set this per-invocation with rpmbuild --define "_topdir ${PWD}/foobar" ... to set the directory to whatever you want. --define is the key to setting values for any macro, not just _topdir.


36

Yes, when an RPM upgrade occurs, RPM first installs the new version of the package and then uninstalls the old version of the package. Only the files of the old package are removed. But your scripts (i.e. %pre, %post, %preun, $postun) need to know whether they are handling an upgrade or just a plain install or uninstall. The rpm command will pass one ...


31

The dist macros isn't defined on CentOS 5 because it isn't in /etc/rpm/macros.disttag - there is a RPM named buildsys-macros-rhel that provides it, or buildsys-macros on fedora, but for some reason it is not repackaged by Centos. Option 1) Download and install fedora build-macros from here Option 2) invoke rpmbuild --define 'dist .el5' every time Option ...


20

You can use the yum-builddep command from the yum-utils package to install all the build dependencies for a package. The arguments can either be paths to spec files, paths to source RPMs or the names of packages which exist as source RPMs in a configured repository, for example: yum-builddep my-package.spec or yum-builddep my-package.src.rpm


16

You can define rpmbuild variables with %(cmd) at the top of the spec file. Notice the command is in parenthesis, not curly brackets. An example: %define whoami %(whoami) And elsewhere in the spec file, such as a script or the build/install sections, use the variable as normal in the curly brackets like this: echo "The user that built this is %{whoami}" ...


14

specify your topdir on the command line like so ... rpmbuild --define "_topdir \`pwd\`" ...


12

Use rpm macro magic to disable building of the debug package (place this somewhere in the spec file): %define debug_package %{nil} I don't know why one of your boxes builds it and the other does not.


12

Sure it supports symlinks. But you actually have to package symlink and not copy the contents to the buildroot. Example spec packaging a symlink to /bin directory called /newbin Name: test Version: 1.0 Release: 1%{?dist} Summary: nothing License: GPLv2 Source0: nothing %description %install rm -rf ...


11

I was working with some RPM stuff today and accidentally stumbled upon the answer for ya! Put these in your spec file: %define _source_payload w0.gzdio %define _binary_payload w0.gzdio That will still use gzip but pass it -0 for a level, which should just store. On my RPM, it made it grow from 21MB to 76MB, so I'm pretty sure this is your answer! BTW, I ...


10

You should be able to fix this issue by adding the following line to your spec file: AutoReq: no Here is my understanding of why this is necessary. When rpmbuild runs across .py files with a #! (shebang) it will automatically add the binary that the shebang specifies as a requirement. Not only that, if the shebang is #!/usr/bin/env python, it will add ...


10

I'm not an RPM expert.. but as far as I know, you could use the %dir directive as follows: %files %dir %attr(0555, myuser, myuser) /opt/myapp/lib %attr(0555, myuser, myuser) /opt/myapp/lib/my.jar or, even simpler: %files %defattr(555,myuser,myuser,555) %dir /opt/myapp/lib /opt/myapp/lib/my.jar The %dir directive allows you to add the directory, but not ...


9

That sounds like it should not be there..I am not familiar with the Apache build process, but I would check the build flags (what is passed to configure or similar, maybe a prefix has gone awry?). Or, try adding an: %exclude %{buildroot}/.../httpd-2.2.7 To the files section as a work around. And finally, and you probably already did this, check what ...


8

Ok, Got the answer. I should have issue the chkconfig command from the %post section instead of %install section.


8

As an application distributor, fpm sounds perfect for your needs. There is an example here which shows how to package an app from source. FPM can produce both deb files and RPM files.


8

rpmbuild -bb --define '_foobar Foo' somespecfile.spec and refer it within the spec as %{_foobar} (the _ is a convention, not a must)


7

Yes, override the %_rpmfilename macro. The default value according to my rpm --showrc is: %%{ARCH}/%%{NAME}-%%{VERSION}-%%{RELEASE}.%%{ARCH}.rpm So, you could add the following (or similar) to the top of your .spec file: %define _rpmfilename %%{NAME}.%%{OS}.%%{ARCH}.rpm


7

The best way to modify an RPM you do not have the source for is to follow these steps: 1) unpack the rpm into a directory with the rpm2cpio command 2) make the necessary changes inside that subdirectory 3) make a "dummy" spec file and build it. That dummy spec file might look like this: Name: blah Version: 1.0 Release: 1 Summary: blah License: blah ...


6

This command has to be typed wherever your setup.py is located. It packages everything that would show up in a bdist tarball. Err... sort of. While it works, the package it creates is not of very high quality. It's better to use sdist_rpm, then unpack the resulting SRPM and then apply your distro's Python packaging guidelines to the generated spec file. Get ...


6

Building an RPM itself is rather easy, you just need to run rpmbuild -ba <mypackage.spec> The more complex task is creating the .spec file, which controls how the rpm itself is built. A good explanation is the book Maximum RPM, which is available on the rpm homepage. Creating a .spec file is handled here. From my own experience building a .spec file ...


6

The correct way to specify your company name is via the Vendor tag like this: Vendor: Yoyodyne, Inc. To get a list of packages by vendor you can run this command: rpm -qa --qf '%{NAME} %{VENDOR}\n' | grep -v Yoyodyne An RPM can only belong to one group. Furthermore, the allowable groups is defined by the distribution. For example, here is the list of ...


6

Similarly, I needed to create an rpm with just a few files. Since these files were source controlled, and because it seemed silly, I didn't want to go through taring them up just to have rpm untar them. I came up with the following: Set up your environment: mkdir -p ~/rpm/{BUILD,RPMS} echo '%_topdir %(echo "$HOME")/rpm' > ~/.rpmmacros Create your spec ...


6

It's been a long time... and thankfully I have no rpm based systems so I can't test this. You can pass parameters to rpmbuild on the commandline rpmbuild --define="version = ${env.BUILD_NUMBER} It would be helpful to post snippets of the spec and the script you're using to build the rpm. You don't want your build script editing the spec file, which I'm ...


5

RPM (or, to be exact, %setup macro) expects your source tarbal test-1.c55.... to contain the directory test-1. If the directory there is different, you can fix that by using %setup -n yourdir See http://www.rpm.org/max-rpm/s1-rpm-inside-macros.html for more details.


5

By default, rpmbuild expects the basename() of the source file to exist in the %_topdir/SOURCES directory, regardless of where it otherwise states. In spec files you'll often see a URL (wget.spec): Source: ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/wget/wget-%{version}.tar.bz2 It doesn't fetch it at build time, even if it was on your own filesystem. The "No such file or ...


5

I found the mistake! The maven-rpm-plugin tool sucks. This package contains class RPMHelper, and uses bash command builder. The rpmbuild tool requires strong param ordering, and this class ignore all rules. I changed param ordering, and now I have correctly builded rpm packet. From what I see, codehaus command is no longer support. I think that need we need ...


5

You can define the _topdir variable in your spec file (e.g., at the top) %define _topdir %(echo $PWD)/


5

Check out http://www.rpm.org/max-rpm/s1-rpm-inside-macros.html, specifically the "-n — Set Name of Build Directory" section. The %setup macro is expecting that after untaring the tar.gz, there will be a hero-01 directory available, but your hero-01.tar.gz probably creates some other directory name, probably one without the version included in the name. ...


5

RPMs aren't meant to take user defined arguments. See RPM - Install time parameters Another similar question is at http://superuser.com/questions/408852/is-it-possible-to-get-users-input-during-installation-of-rpm One workaround is to have the rpm's postinstall script ask for input from stdin, in which case you can pass in the answers by redirecting stdio ...


5

Turns out I just needed to provide my own %clean directive in the spec file and leave it blank to override the default. For some reason I didn't expect that to work. ;) A define can conditionalize the %Clean% phase so that the same effect as --noclean can be achieved. %Clean %if "%{noclean}" == "" rm -rf $RPM_BUILD_ROOT %endif Called with rpmbuild ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible