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38

Deploying Rails on Google's App Engine has become a lot easier than it used to be. There are a couple of caveats you should be aware of: App Engine only supports the Python and Java environments so for Rails you will be deploying on JRuby App Engine's datastore is based on BigTable so you won't be able to use ActiveRecord on a relational database (if you ...


23

You need to require 'data_mapper', not datamapper. Note there is a datamapper gem as well as a data_mapper gem, but they are the same thing, just different names. You need use data_mapper as the library name in both of them. As far as I can tell datamapper is a straight copy of data_mapper: $ diff -r data_mapper-1.2.0/ datamapper-1.2.0/ diff -r ...


20

As someone who uses DataMapper every day at my job, I would recommend sticking to ActiveRecord unless you are connecting to a legacy database that you don't control the schema of (but I would also consider Sequel if that were the case). Beyond the fact that it is EOL (as a maintainer stated on the mailing list), many gems that need model persistence will ...


9

If you look at the SQL that's being generated it gives you a clue as to what's going on (if you don't know, you can do this with DataMapper::Logger.new(STDOUT, :debug) before your call to DataMapper::setup). Person.all simply generates: SELECT "id", "type", "name", "age" FROM "people" ORDER BY "id" as you would expect. Male.all generates: SELECT "id", ...


6

You specify both sides of the relationship only when you want to use the methods generated by the extra specification. It's completely optional: If you never need to get to the Post from the Comment (e.g. @comment.post), you won't have to specify the belongs_to relation in Comment. One advantage is that your instances are a bit cleaner because in Comment ...


5

Use this to embody your SQL statements in a transaction and rollback if an error occurs: require 'dm-transactions' YourModel.transaction do |t| begin @sql_statements.each do |sql_statement| DataMapper.repository(:default).adapter.execute(sql_statement) end rescue DataObjects::Error t.rollback end end Take a look at Using ...


5

So, as I was typing this up, the answer came to me (of course!). I've burned several hours trying to figure this out, and I hope this will save others the pain and frustration I've experienced. To get the JSON I'm looking for, I just had to create a hash like this: { :errors => person.errors.to_h }.to_json So, now my Sinatra route looks like this: ...


5

In the 1.x series of datamapper the dirty tracking is done via calling #== on the new and old attribute values to detect dirtyness. If an object is mutated inplace (for example with the String bang methods), the change cannot be detected as the "orignal" state gets mutated also. Basically the following happens internally: a = "foo" b = a.gsub!("foo", ...


5

You really should take a look at Sequel if you're considering DataMapper, FWIW I will be migrating away from ActiveRecord to Sequel. However if you like the opinionated Rails ideology then you shouldn't look any further than ActiveRecord for least friction. With no disrespect to the hard work of the Rails community and developers, but after dealing with ...


4

As far as I can tell, you no longer need to call rollback() for a transaction to be rolled back. You merely need to enclose it in a transaction block, like so: YourModel.transaction do @sql_statements.each do |sql_statement| DataMapper.repository(:default).adapter.execute(sql_statement) end end At least, that's how I read the dm-transactions spec ...


4

Thanks, Nicolas, I actually came up with a similar solution. I've accepted your answer since it makes use of Datamapper's dm-pagination system, but I'm wondering if this would do equally as well (or worse): while authors = Author.slice(offset, CHUNK) do authors.each do |a| # do something with a end offset += CHUNK end


4

require 'rubygems' require 'data_mapper' class Foo include DataMapper::Resource property :name, String, :key => true before :create, do puts 'Create: Only happens when saving a new object.' end before :update, do puts 'Update: Only happens when saving an existing object.' end before :save, do puts 'Save: Happens when ...


4

You can! It will look something like this: users = User.all(:id => [1,2,3]) EDIT: you can see this on the github page for dm-core: # If the value of a pair is an Array, we do an IN-clause for you. Person.all(:name.like => 'S%', :id => [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ]) # Does a NOT IN () clause for you. Person.all(:name.not => [ 'bob', 'rick', ...


4

I'd recommend sequel. From Querying with Sequel: require 'sequel' DB = Sequel.connect # database information goes here class Thing < Sequel::Model end result_objects = DB["SELECT * FROM things"].all Then simply parse the result_objects into JSON: require 'json' hashes = result_objects.collect { |ro| ro.to_hash } JSON.generate(hashes)


3

The DM 1.3 beta seems to work with 3.2.1, at least for the demo dm_rails app. I had to comment out two "active_record" lines in config/environments/development.rb To update to the 1.3 beta I deleted my Gemfile.lock file, specified the git repository for each dm gem (below), and then ran a bundle install. gem 'dm-core', git: ...


3

There is flags option on the property that you can use to lookup the enum values. I don't know where this is documented - I found it here. So you could do something like this: <form> <select> <% Animal.type.options[:flags].each do |animal| %> <option value="<%= animal %>"><%= animal %></option> <% ...


3

I found the solution at http://rubydoc.info/github/datamapper/dm-core/master/DataMapper/NamingConventions/Resource/UnderscoredAndPluralizedWithoutModule repository(:myreponame).adapter.resource_naming_convention = DataMapper::NamingConventions::Resource::UnderscoredAndPluralizedWithoutModule change :myreponame Also at ...


3

You're performing a group by operation. Enumerable#group_by produces a hash whose keys are the values from the block and whose values are arrays of all initial elements that has that key. You can then use Enumerable#each_with_object to create a new hash with those keys, but the values reduced to just the key4 element you desired. a = [ { id: 1, key1: ...


3

At my work we ran into many problems with DataMapper. Eventually after much research and talking to developers I realised it was a dead-end project. I documented the reasons we decided to abandon it here: http://opensourceame.com/why-we-abandoned-ruby-datamapper/


2

Datamapper will run just one sql query for the example above so it will have to keep the whole result set in memory. I think you should use some sort of pagination if your collection is big. Using dm-pagination you could do something like: PAGE_SIZE = 20 pager = Author.page(:per_page => PAGE_SIZE).pager # This will run a count query ...


2

What you want is the dm-chunked_query plugin: (example from the docs) require 'dm-chunked_query' MyModel.each_chunk(20) do |chunk| chunk.each do |resource| # ... end end This will allow you to iterate over all the records in the model, in chunks of 20 records at a time. EDIT: the example above had an extra #each after #each_chunk, and it was ...


2

DataMapper and DataObjects (the lower layer that connects to the DB) do works on Windows. However, seems that do_mysql 0.10.7 is missing the precompiled binary for x86-mingw32 platform: http://rubygems.org/gems/do_mysql/versions You can compile do_mysql yourself using MySQL Connector/C interface, which is independent of the version of MySQL you have ...


2

DataMapper falls down in these scenarios, since effectively what you're looking for is the LEFT JOIN query where everything on the right is NULL. SELECT tasks.* FROM tasks LEFT JOIN parents_tasks ON parents_tasks.task_id = task.id WHERE parents_tasks.task_id IS NULL You parents/children situation makes no different here, since they are both n:n mappings. ...


2

For some reason, DataMapper's Rails template completely replaces the standard Gemfile with their own, which doesn't include any of the asset handling stuff (it also removes a handful of other things like jQuery support, TestUnit, ActionMailer...). You'll want to add these back in to your Gemfile after setting up the new application: group :assets do gem ...


2

Datamapper has it’s own serialization library, dm-serializer, that provides a to_json method for any Datamapper resource. If you require Datamapper with require 'data_mapper' in your code, you are using the data_mapper meta-gem that requires dm-serializer as part of it’s set up. The to_json method provided by dm-serializer only serializes the Datamapper ...


2

You could edit the JSON string, but as far as I know there's no easy way to inject arbitrary values into the JSON. Calling your_dm_resource.to_json(:methods => [:total_pages]) is the correct way to do what you want, check your some_dm_resource.total_pages method is working that way you expect. And if you're using a modern Ruby, you can drop the hash ...


2

You can do it simpler. { data: YourModel.your_whatever, total_pages: YourModel.total_pages }.to_json DM serialization to_json tries to call methods provided in options on the same object it is called itself (in your case - probably collection of results, that does not have total_pages method defined)


2

I found the solution class abc include DataMapper::Resource def self.default_repository_name :mydb end is :reflective reflect end I took the idea from http://workswithruby.com/2008/12/using-datamapper-on-legacy-databases I wish datamapper documentation would have mentioned about it somewhere.


2

You can specify the position of NULl in ORDER BY clause. Check this Sorting Rows. I am not sure in datamapper but the sql will be like this SELECT select_list FROM table_expression ORDER BY sort_expression DESC NULLS LAST



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