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5

Try this .where(:date => date_start..date_end, :order => {:id => 23043})


5

You can try this: <div class="container"> <% @buildings.each_slice(2) do |(b1, b2)| %> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-6"><%= render b1 %></div> <div class="col-md-6"><%= render b2 if b2 %></div> </div> <% end %> </div>


4

I think you are misinterpreting the results. There should be no difference in the way an expression is interpreted in irb and rails. When you do: var = false or true it is interpreted as: (var = false) or true after which the value of var is false, and whose return value is true. Since irb returns the return value of the expression, you will get true. ...


3

\\ is just a escaped \. If you print, puts it, you will see the actual string. >> '\s' # == "\\s" => "\\s" >> puts '\s' \s => nil BTW, "\s" (not '\s') is another representation of whitespace " ": >> "\s" == " " => true


3

You can use I18n instead: In your view: <%= t(:hello) %> In your config/locales/en.yml: en: hello: "foo"


3

You could nest posts inside groups like this: resources :groups do ... resources :posts, only: [:create, :destroy] end Run 'rake routes' to see how your routes are named. Your form_for must contain a reference to group, i.e. form_for [@group, @post] do ... end Group id will be available in the params hash as params[:group_id] Also check out ...


3

"form-group checkbox-group group for-group" .gsub(/(#{Regexp.union(black_list)})|group/){$1 || "team"} # => "form-group checkbox-group team for-team"


3

If you are looking for a regex only solution (assuming blacklist is prefix only) s = 'form-group checkbox-group group for-group' s.gsub /(?<!checkbox-|form-)group/, 'team' Link to rubular to fiddle around.


3

1. Iterate over col and check each. No explanation required. 2. Use existing library functionality to do the same: keys = [:a, :b, :c] h = { c: 1, f: 2, h: 3 } h.any? { |key, val| keys.include? key } => true 3. Set math: h.keys & keys => [:c] Then wrap it up to return true/false depending on which way you want things to read.


2

Your instincts are good - you don't want to repeat yourself, and there are better ways of structuring this code. But rather than sharing variables, you should think about small pieces, loosely joined. Write methods that do one thing well, and combine them together. For instance, we could write a get_client method that just returns a client for other methods ...


2

You're not iterating over your buildings. You need to grab each one and then do what you were trying to do: <%- @buildings.each do |building| %> <%- if building.images.any? %> ... <%- end %> <%- end %> You can also do: index.html.erb <%= render @buildings %> This will take each Building object and pass it to a ...


2

You can just chain the clauses together and it will automatically join them with an AND: .where("date > ? and date < ?", date_start, date_end). where(:orders => {:id => 23043})


2

@buildings is an array of Building objects. Every Building object has its images method. You might iterate over the @buildings array and call the images method of every member. <% @buildings.each do |building| %> This is Building with ID <%= building.id %>. <% if building.images.any? %> ... <% end %> <% end %> Also, ...


2

You have only route to create action in ResponsesController. If you also want route to index, you should have: resources :responses, only: [:create, :index] If you want routes to all default resources actions, you should abandon only option, like this: resources :responses


2

It's usually a simple nested resources... resources :authors do resources :articles end This gives you a route authors/:author_id/articles (named as author_articles_path(@author)) In your articles index controller you would do.. def index @author = Author.find(param[:author_id]) @articles = @author.articles end hope this helps.


2

Try this: my_hash.keys & col # => [c] & intersects the list of keys with the col array, returning only item in col which appear as keys in my_hash. Another option - values_at: my_hash.values_at(*col).compact # => [1]


2

You are testing for the presence of flash[:success], but in your controller you are using flash[:notice]


2

you can setup the hash on the paperclip initializer file (config/initializers/paperclip_defaults.rb) Quoting from paperclip wiki: Paperclip::Attachment.default_options.update({ :path => ":class/:attachment/:hash/:style.:extension", :hash_secret => "SOME_RANDOM_SECRET" }) The :hash part is generated from :hash_secret and the pattern given ...


2

If you have already run the migration you will have to create a new one. rails g migration AddTypeToUsers And then in the migration file you can edit in change_table :users do |t| t.string :type t.string :memory_token end Then run a migration rake db:migrate to make the changes If you haven't run the migration then you can simply add t.string ...


2

Replace your each block with: <% @task.work_blocks.each do |work_block| %> <li><%=link_to work_block.name , work_block_path(work_block)%></br> <%end%> You were outputting the evaluation of each block as well by using <%= @task.work_blocks.each...%>. Have a look at the answers on Difference between <% … %> and ...


1

Ruby is an Object Oriented language. This means that objects not only have members (=state) but also methods (=behavior). When you are calling a method on an object (is which case the object is called the caller) the method that runs is the method which corresponds to this object's type behavior. When you are calling a method with no caller, self is ...


1

Most likely, what you're seeing is the result of how IRB displays values. Your second example is correct, (the actual result only contains a single slash, which you can confirm by creating a new Regexp object from it): >> "\\s?" "\\s?" >> puts "\\s?" \s? >> Regexp.new "\\s?" /\s?/


1

If enable is a boolean field in clients table, you can just specify the collection option in association method as below: = f.association :client, collection: Client.where(enable: true)


1

The likely reason for this is that you're using cancan's load_and_authorize_resource or load_resource, and you forgot creating the model object in the controller action (@song = Song.new(params[:song]), so the resource is being created twice, which causes carrierwave to move the file to cache twice.


1

Try to use user attributes like this: test "a logged in user can access their account page" do @user = FactoryGirl.create(:user) @user_attrs = FactoryGirl.attributes_for(:user) # Sign in first visit signin_path fill_in 'email', with: @user_attrs.email fill_in 'password', with @user_attrs.password click_button 'Login' # Then visit account ...


1

OK, I've found the solution for myself: execute each SQL statement independently: execute "DROP TABLE requests;" execute "CREATE TABLE requests (id TEXT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, name TEXT);"


1

If I understand you correctly you need to call rent_method to update member_id Routes changes put 'rent_method' View changes <%= simple_form_for @costumes_and_cost_record, method: :put, url: [@costumes_and_cost_record, :rent_method] do |f| %> <%= f.association :member, :label => "Member", label_method: :to_s, value_method: :member_id, ...


1

Try this is in your view file: %h1 Welcome = render :partial => "my_blog/source/_index" Note: You must have _index.html.erb partial file in the above specified path. Also, try to change the name from _index.html.erb to _someothername.html.erb, because index.html.erb is usualy a view file for index action. You can avoid the unwanted confusions. This ...


1

I guess this should work: Person.joins(houses: :appliances).select('appliances.price')


1

From talking on Skype, I think there are several things to look at Init Currently, you're using the google_analytics_api method every time you want to use the module. This is completely inefficient, and is partly why you have this issue now. Instead, I would create an init method, which will fire each time you initialize the object (and make ...



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