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6

The gem is just a way for Ruby/Rails to talk to a Postgres server. The gem itself does not contain its own server. You'll still need to install one: sudo apt-get install postgresql


6

Using index == 0 is perfectly fine as index is accessible within your loop. Your real problem is probably in this line: word == "and" || "or" || "over" || "the" || "for" This is always true-like! What you mean is: ["and", "or", "over", "the", "for"].include? word Apart form that there is a method called each_with_index, which you can use like this: ...


5

Your member_params method doesn't need to specify group_members_attributes as a nested hash, you should just be able to permit the attributes directly (they'll be permitted on whatever you put in the require(...) part): def member_params params.require(:group_member).permit(:first_name, :last_name, :email, :telephone, :relationship, :status) end


4

If these attributes are database columns, you can use: Organization.order(attribute_a: :desc, attribute_b: :asc) Otherwise, use sort with an array: Arrays are compared in an “element-wise” manner; the first two elements that are not equal will determine the return value for the whole comparison. Exchanging the first elements sorts them in descending ...


4

The helpers aren't included by default in the console. You can include them first and it'll work: >> include ActionView::Helpers::TextHelper >> pluralize(1, 'person') # => "1 person" Or, you can use the helper object which Rails gives you in the console: >> helper.pluralize(1, 'person') # => "1 person"


4

If you look at docs. The html generated by button_to helper is <%= button_to "New", action: "new" %> # => "<form method="post" action="/controller/new" class="button_to"> # <div><input value="New" type="submit" /></div> # </form>" So when you have a button_to inside a form you basically have a form inside a ...


4

You can make use of the pluralization features of the I18n library by defining count values to translation keys (i.e. config/locales/en.yml): en: cats: one: 'There is one cat.' other: 'There are %{count} cats.' Then, in your code (or view, or anywhere else, since I18n is globally available) 3.times{|i| puts I18n.t('cats', count: i) } will ...


4

I do not understand why I get the additional information associated with that job in [ ]. You have to remove = in this line <%= @customer.jobs.each do |job| %> It should be <% @customer.jobs.each do |job| %> A small note <% %> #Executes the Ruby code. <%= %> #Prints the output.


4

This line <% form_for(@ad ,:url=>{:action=>'create',method: :post}) do |f| %> should be like this <%= form_for(@ad ,:url=>{:action=>'create',method: :post}) do |f| %> You are missing = sign Reference,see the API Additional note I guess you can refactor it to <%= form_for(@ad) do |f| %>


3

Controller When you mentioned you didn't know whether your method should be stored in the controller or a helper, you need to appreciate the role of the MVC programming pattern in Rails: The way Rails works (and remember, Rails is based on top of Ruby -- it's a gem in actuality), which means that if you want to use a particular method / file in your ...


3

You have to return a response. As your request format is application/json you can return something like the example below or a more informative message as per the request. render json: {success: true}


3

class ProjectInvitation < ActiveRecord::Base belongs_to :sender, class_name: Account, foreign_key: :sender_account_id belongs_to :recipient, class_name: Account, foreign_key: :recipient_account_id end class Account < ActiveRecord::Base has_many: :sent_invitations, class_name: ProjectInvitation, foreign_key: :sender_account_id has_many: ...


3

Extending @DylanMarkow's answer, if you are trying to save first_name, last_name, email, telephone, relationship fields in database then you need to remove the following line from GroupMember model: attr_accessor :first_name, :last_name, :email, :telephone, :relationship Due to the attr_accessor, the above mentioned fields are considered as virtual ...


3

This is a complex issue. As you said, you can store this information in a session (so in the cookie), but it is not enough. Simple clearing up the cookie unlocks possibility to vote again. So, my idea is to store the possible information we can get: IP address User-Agent X-Forwarded-For (information about the proxy) and everything else exists in the http ...


3

I want to select all the users that have atleast one video. All you need to do is use joins method @users = User.joins(:videos) It will retrieve all users which have associated video(s) i.e., users without any associated videos would not be part of the results and query formed would be: SELECT users.* FROM users INNER JOIN videos ON videos.user_id ...


3

Either use until i > 50 do # ... end or while i <= 50 do # ... end Here's a more "Ruby like" example: (0..50).each do |i| puts i end


3

You should do allow(MyMod::Utils).to receive(:find_x).and_return({something: 'testing'}) Check out the doco Method stubs.


3

:multipart => true should be part of the second options hash, not the first one (the first one is just for the URL -- I assume that when you submit this form, you're actually seeing "&multipart=true" in the address bar?). Also, as @Vasseurth mentioned, you need to put your form elements in a block connected to the form: <%= form_tag({:action => ...


3

Not sure why you need to do this but this should work 1.is_a? Product.columns_hash["id"].type.to_s.classify.constantize #=> true "a".is_a? Product.columns_hash["id"].type.to_s.classify.constantize #=> false Can you specify a purpose for this as it might be something more easily handled through other conventions. You could patch this into Symbol if ...


3

You are receiving these parameters: Parameters: {"saved_query"=>"1"} ie, params[:saved_query] returns "1". Thus, when you do @saved_query = SavedQuery.new(params[:saved_query]) you are really doing @saved_query = SavedQuery.new("1") and that's not going to work, as SavedQuery.new expects a Hash, not a String. If instead you do @saved_query = ...


3

Yep. You've got a typo. destory.


2

https://blog.engineyard.com/2014/ruby-app-server-arena-pt1 Here is comparing of various servers with explanation of pros and cons of each.


2

Ok, so I made it work this way: Gemfile: gem 'fog' config/gce.yml: development: provider: Google google_storage_access_key_id: XXX google_storage_secret_access_key: XXX model: has_attached_file :avatar, :styles => { :big => "100x100#", :thumb => "25x25#" }, :storage => :fog, ...


2

By using expect(...).to receive(...), the original method is not being called. Rather, when it is called, it just returns whatever you passed into and_return(...) without actually executing your method. What you probably want is and_call_original. This way, you can ensure the method is called, and still allow it to execute: expect(AnotherTest).to ...


2

The return value of false doesn't mean it failed, it just means 4 isn't nil. If it failed, it would have raised an error. RSpec uses a NegativeOperatorMatcher class to test not_to expectations (source code here): class NegativeOperatorMatcher < OperatorMatcher def __delegate_operator(actual, operator, expected) return false unless ...


2

To answer your question directly: yes, you can deploy your Rails app without a database; but it won't run Since you're new, let me explain: -- Heroku Heroku runs on the AWS cloud computing infrastructure. I'm not exactly how it does this, but every "dyno" you use is essentially an AWS "instance" (which is why you get 750 dyno-hours for free -- you get ...


2

I think your issue is more systemic than specific; and as such I'd like to give some ideas Controller When you use before_action, it runs before your Rails action is run This means when you send a request to Rails, it loads the before_action filter, and then the relevant action that you've requested. Partials do not form part of this process: This ...


2

You are just trying to validate that the country code entered is appropriate? this should work with carmen validates :country, inclusion:{in:Carmen::Country.all.map(&:code)} But if this is all you need seems like the countries gem might work well too. With countries you could do validates :country, inclusion:{in:Country.all.map(&:pop)} Or ...


2

In Rails, there is a method camelize in String class. Use it: "can_purchase".camelize(:lower) #=> "canPurchase" "created_at".camelize(:lower) #=> "createdAt"


2

You can use the send_file method, passing the path to the file as the first argument, as see in Rails documentation. UPDATE You can use a temporary file to save the CSV, like this: require 'tempfile' # automatically creates a file in /tmp file = Tempfile.new('data.csv', 'w') file.write('my csv') file.close send_file(file.path) # remove the file from ...



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