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6

frequency is defined as a hash with 0 as default value. So when frequency[word] is invoked for the word that wasn't recorded before it returns 0. The code seems to count the different words in the text. When it finishes, the frequency will contain words as keys and number of times the particular word appears in the sentence as values. You can play with it ...


5

You can use single quote (') instead of double quote (") to prevent interpretation of escape sequence: irb(main):001:0> print '\"' \"=> nil or %q{...} in case there are many 's in the string: irb(main):002:0> print %q{\"} \"=> nil


4

This has nothing to do with #next_week and - 3.hours working at the same time. It is a misunderstanding about how #next_week works. #next_week assumes by default a week is Monday-Sunday. This means when calling just #next_week it will return the next Monday at 00:00:00:00. Example: DateTime.now.next_week #=> Mon, 03 Aug 2015 00:00:00 -0400 Okay so ...


4

Your input lengths cannot form a triangle. The sum of the lengths of any two sides of a triangle must be greater than the length of the third side of that triangle. 539.939 + 130.0 = 669.939 which is less than the third side of length 673.746 So your code seems to be trying to fit those lengths to a triangle, which requires a bit of elongation.


4

The answer to this question can be found here: http://tmm1.net/ruby21-fstrings/ In Ruby 2.1, "str".freeze is optimized by the compiler to return a single shared frozen strings on every invocation. An alternative "str"f syntax was implemented initially, but later reverted. Although the external scope of this feature is limited, internally it is used ...


4

The variables x_min, x_max, y_min, y_max are used to store the coordinates of the intersecting region. They are obtained using max and min on a two-value array using the passed-in rectangles. Calling [1 ,2].max will return 2, and calling [1,2].min will return 1 for example. The reason why these variables represent the intersecting rectangle is probably ...


3

You an call the class methods directly on a class, and to call instance methods, you need to create an instance of the class: Class D before_create :x def x # for a class method A.b # for an instance method a = A.new a.c end end


3

|| and or are not the same in Ruby (see Difference between "or" and || in Ruby?) because of precedence. So your statement: str.include? '.' or str.include? '-' is actually equivalent to: str.include?('.' || str.include?('-'))


3

You should use some SQL magic: scope :top_by_number_of_favorites, -> { joins(:favorite_mappings). where("date_liked >= ?", 2.weeks.ago). group(:id). select("comfy_cms_pages.*, COUNT(*) AS favorite_score"). order("favorite_score DESC"). limit(10) } First two lines – we join favorite_mappings to query result, selecting only ...


3

In your voter partial (app/views/votes/_voter.html.erb) you pass the string 'post_up_vote_path(post)' as the url argument for link_to. You just need to get rid of the quotes, so change the link_to to this: link_to " ", post_up_vote_path(post), class: 'glyphicon glyphicon-chevron-up', method: :post You will have to do the same with the down vote link.


2

It's to do with operator precedence. or is much lower than ||. It's trying to parse cpf.include? '.' || cpf.include? '-' as cpf.include?('.' || cpf.include? '-' ) and gets confused as the second include? doesn't have brackets. http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Ruby_Operator_Precedence Note or and || are not the same thing. see ...


2

You can use \K with a Negative Lookahead assertion: \b(?!fo+)\w*\Kbar Demo A simple solution would be to place what you want to ignore on the left side of the alternation and place what you want to match in a capturing group on the right side of the alternation operator. fo+bar|\w*(bar)


2

You have to use rake <namespace>:<task>. In your case that would be rake initiate:initiate


2

You have two options: 1) Let Rails resolve it for you using has_and_belongs_to_many association (under the hood, Rails will create a new table to make the many-to-many association, but you don't need to deal with it directly); 2) Specifying which table you want to use (as you did using PHP), via has_many :through You can check the docs here: ...


2

This is because the month you are specifying doesn't have the current day. I mean the current month (July) has 31 days but the month you're setting (June) has only 30 days. You can change your code like so: # in Rails: date = Date.today.beginning_of_month # or Date.today.change(day: 1) Then chain your 'change' in front of the date variable.


2

This actually happens, because today is the 31 of July, and not all months have 31 days in it, for example June, the 6th month, has only 30 days in it.


2

The number that you see in the image name is the fingerprinting, that Rails adds to assets in production environment, to assure, that if you update some asset, it will not be loaded from a browser cache for a user, who already visited your website. You can read more about it here: ...


2

If you can use anchors, it may be doable. They enable you to make sure the bar you peek at in the lookahead is same bar you consume in the main regex: ^(?!fo+bar$)[a-z]*\Kbar$ \b(?!fo+bar\b)[a-z]*\Kbar\b If you can't use anchors, it may not be possible. We would need to know a lot more about the kind of strings you're expecting to see, as well as more ...


2

The A method b is simple, that is a class method and can be invoked directly from that class. So class D def y A.b end end A method c is more interesting as that is an instance method. So you need to create an instance of class A and then invoke its method c. You can do it like this: class D def z A.new.c end end However, you usually ...


2

It seems like .habit-check is no longer a checkbox, so your old code that handles the change event won't work. So I assume you want to make this work with the link instead of a checkbox. I also assume you're using Rails jquery-ujs (unobtrusive javascript with jQuery), which is the default nowadays. You don't need to manually trigger an Ajax request with ...


2

The form params should be accessible through the params[:user] (since you have form_for(:user)): def home user = Parse::User.authenticate( params[:user][:username], params[:user][:password] ) end


2

You can override render just for that particular controller to always do your thing before rendering. Something like this: class BooksController < ApplicationController def action1 @books = ... end def action2 @books = ... end private def render(*args) if @books.present? && param1.present? && param2.present? ...


2

You have defined a constraint for region_id, but you are not using it within your routes. Change your constraint to: constraints( state_abbreviation: /A[KLRZ]|C[AOT]|D[CE]|FL|GA|HI|I[ADLN]|K[SY]|LA|M[ADEINOST]|N[CDEHJMVY]|O[HKR]|P[AR]|RI|S[CD]|T[NX]|UT|V[AIT]|W[AIVY]/ ) do and all should work.


2

I will do this User.joins("LEFT JOIN relationships ON relationships.user_id = users.id").where('relationships.user_id IS NULL').offset(rand(0..100)).first Something like: member_ids = Relationship.where(member: true).pluck(:user_id).uniq users = User.where.not(id: member_ids) # or User.where('id NOT in (?)', member_ids) on Rails < 4


2

Try this: class Article < Comfy::Cms::Page has_many :favorite_mappings has_many :view_mappings def self.top_by_number_of_favorites(since = 2.weeks.ago, amount = 10) with_favorite_score .where('date_liked >= ?', since) .order('favorite_score DESC') .limit(amount) end def self.top_by_number_of_views(since = 2.weeks.ago, ...


2

You can use available authorization gems like pundit,cancancan etc. Here is an example using with pundit. Sample code #app/policies/user_policy.rb class UserPolicy attr_reader :current_user def initialize(current_user) @current_user = current_user end def edit? @current_user end end #users_controller def edit @user = current_user ...


2

When you enter ruby at the command-line, it's supposed to "hang forever". It's waiting for you to give it instructions. You can use CTRL+D to get it to stop waiting: > ruby puts 1 + 1 2 I then did CTRL+D and returned to the command-line prompt. Instead though, we don't use Ruby like that. If we want to use it interactively, we use IRb which comes with ...


2

String#<=> compares the first characters of the strings, then the next characters of the strings, and so on, similar to how you'd compare strings if you were alphabetizing them. '5' <= '12' is false because '5' <= '1' is false.


1

Just declare a private function in your controller, and use it in your actions: class BooksController < ApplicationController def action1 @books = ... foo end def action2 @books = ... foo end def action3 @books = ... foo end ... def action84 @books = ... foo end private def foo @books = ...


1

You can just use the collection in the representable module. Although you have only a single object, since you want to wrap it in an Array. It technically become a collection with a single object. Then define a getter with that collection name in the parent object. Here is an example: require 'ostruct' require 'representable' require 'representable/json' ...



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