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6

Use scan() instead. It returns an array with all the matches. match() will only return the first match. "(e), (f), and (g)".scan(/\(\w+\)/)


6

I was under the impression that for Ruby > ~2.0.0, passing in the ampersand was optional and equivalent to just passing in the symbol. No, it's not. pluck(&:id) Is a shorthand for pluck { |u| u.id } i.e. you are passing a block. pluck however ignores the block, so the above is equivalent to pluck { } or just pluck which returns an array ...


5

Because - has higher precedence here than &: a - (a&b) # => [1, 2]


4

Ruby's syntax allows you to postfix a single ? or ! to your method names (both or more than one of each is invalid). This is to support a couple of deeply ingrained conventions: method?: A method that returns a boolean and doesn't modify its receiver's state should use a ?. For example, if you want to "ask" whether a container is sorted, you might use ...


4

This isn’t really an encoding problem, in the first case the strings compare as false simply because they are different. The first character of the first string isn’t a ”normal“ a, it is actually U+0430 CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER A — the first two bytes (208 and 176, or 0xD0 and 0xB0 in hex) are the UTF-8 encoding for this character. It just happens to look ...


4

Rails applications use bundler (that's the thing using the Gemfile). When bundler loads the Gemfile on startup of a rails application, it automatically requires all gems listed there, thus you don't have to do this yourself.


4

This is done through bundler/setup: http://bundler.io/v1.3/bundler_setup.html. It is required inside your config/boot.rb file. In short it firstly sets environmental variable to point to your Gemfile: ENV['BUNDLE_GEMFILE'] ||= File.expand_path('../../Gemfile', __FILE__) Then it adds paths for all your gems to LOAD_PATH, by requiring bundler/setup: ...


3

ActiveRecord::Base.connection.execute("delete from users where id=2")


3

Those aren't Ruby error messages. You aren't running your Ruby files with a Ruby interpreter. There's no concept of "bareword" in Ruby, and semicolons are entirely optional, so it wouldn't report about them either.


3

You can do something like this in your config/initializers/inflections.rb file. ActiveSupport::Inflector.inflections do |inflect| inflect.irregular 'interesse', 'interesses' end


3

You should place your user? method in helper. About your view code, why don't you use boolean alternative? <% if admin_signed_in? || user?(file.user_id) %> <td><%= button_to "Delete", file, method: :delete, class: "btn btn-danger", confirm: "Are you sure that you wish to delete #{file.name}?" %></td> <% end %>


3

The problem is not with encodings. A single file or a single terminal can only have a single encoding. If you copy and paste both strings into the same source file or the same terminal window, they will get inserted with the same encoding. The problem is also not with normalization or folding. The first string has 4 octets: 0xD0 0xB0 0x6E 0x64. The first ...


3

Assuming you want this for rails (otherwise blank? is undefined) you can use presence method: def squash(value) value && value.strip.presence end In pure ruby, I would do: def squash(value) return unless value value = value.strip value unless value.empty? end


3

Your second example is more idiomatic to Ruby. def test x || y end It uses short circuit evaluation to return the first "truthy" value in a comparison. The performance gain between this and the ternary operator is probably negligent. From experience, I'll say that I don't see the ternary operator very often in Ruby. One scenario where the above x || y ...


2

2.1.2 :006 > a - a&b => [] 2.1.2 :007 > a - (a&b) => [1, 2] You can get ruby operator precedence table from here.


2

What about block? ActiveRecord have many ways for this: User.new.tap do |user| user.name = "John Doe" user.username = "john.doe" user.password = "john123" end or: User.new do |user| user.name = "John Doe" user.username = "john.doe" user.password = "john123" end or mix initialize: User.new(name: "John Doe") do |user| user.username ...


2

If this is ActiveRecord object then: user.assign_attributes( first_name: "first" last_name: "last" email: "e@mail.com" )


2

Marek is right, however, you may wish to use an authorization gem such as CanCanCan for this There's a great Railscast about authorization here: To give you a brief synopsis, authorization is the authority that a user has to CRUD an object. Authentication (Devise) is for giving the user "permission" to use various features in the application; ...


2

These are parts of method names. Ruby convention is that methods returning boolean values are named with ? on the end, while possibly harmful methods are named with !.


2

Assuming that Employee has_many :absences, this should work: def away?(date = Date.today) absences.where('start_date <= :date AND (end_date >= :date OR end_date IS NULL)', date: date).exists? end


2

I would do something like this: # add this to absence.rb def covers_today? (start_date..end_date).cover?(Date.today) end # add this to employee.rb def away? absences.any?(&:covers_today?) end After doing this just call away? on an employee: @employee.away? # => true, if employee has an absense that covers the current date


2

%w[a b c a a b b c c c].chunk{|e| e}.map{|_, v| v.length}.max #=> 3


2

Your uuid_exists? method checks for the presence of a row whose uuid is self.uuid, ie the value of your model's uuid attribute. However your loop is only setting a local variable called uuid, so the attribute is always nil (since you only assign a value to it once the loop has completed), and your existance check does nothing. This unrelated to the fact ...


2

I think the Virtual Machine is the best solution because it is pretty light, can be easily exported/copied (saved in Dropbox also!) and can be destroyed easily too. This is my setup on my personal computer that I use sometimes when I work from home : OS: Windows 7 with Oracle's Virtual Box to manage a virtual machine 1 Virtual Machine with Ubuntu 12.04 ...


2

You can use String#% method : puts "%d topic is %d, %d topic is %d, All topics $%d" % array


2

<%= @tasks.each do |task| %> Should be <% @tasks.each do |task| %> notice the lack of = <%= means evaluate and execute the code and insert into the html <% means to simply evaluate and execute the code


2

Did you write this method? If so, change the definition of it to only yield if block_given? Otherwise, if it strictly requires a block, you could do it this way by using the implicit block syntax: (time_in_intervals('7AM', '8PM', 60) { }).count


2

Here's one way: def squash(str) (str && str[/\S/]) ? str.strip : nil end /\S/ looks for a character that is not whitespace. squash " My dog has fleas. " #=> "My dog has fleas." squash " " #=> nil squash nil #=> nil Reader challenge I tried to also implement squash!, that would convert the argument ...


2

This will work with plain Ruby: def squash(str) str = str.to_s.strip str unless str.empty? end


2

You could introduce a separate Instruction class with a custom inspect method, something like this: class Instruction attr_accessor :opcode, :rs, :rt, :rd, :shamt, :function def initialize(opcode, rs, rt, rd, shamt, function) @opcode, @rs, @rt, @rd, @shamt, @function = opcode, rs, rt, rd, shamt, function end def inspect sprintf("Opcode: ...



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