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5

class Book < Struct.new(:title, :content) def title super.gsub(/\S+/, &:capitalize) end end book = Book.new('harry potter', 'a bunch of content here') book.title # => "Harry Potter" Book = Struct.new(:title, :content) do alias orig_title title def title orig_title.gsub(/\S+/, &:capitalize) end end To prevent title is ...


4

You can use like @event=Event.where("user_id= ? or user2_id = ?", current_user.id, current_user.id)


4

11: for word in words 12: if nouns.include?(word) 13: hashes[word][:nouns] = true 14: end 15: 16: if adjectives.include?(word) 17: hashes[word][:adjectives] = true 18: end 19: end word, that was i before (I gave it a better name), is actually already an element of the array, not an index.


4

puts a.grep(/[A-Z]!/) will do.


3

You can set a git and branch in your Gemfile for this gem (see documentation) # Gemfile gem 'yomu', :git => 'https://github.com/jeremybmerrill/yomu.git', :branch => 'feature/servermode'


3

You can do class UsersController < ApplicationController   def index @users = User.all   end #..other actions end Now the index.html.erb view will be rendered, and you can show there the quantity. User is a model. Read this Getting Started with Rails to understand Rails MVC at a glance. In your view app/views/users/index.html.erb, suppose you ...


3

You gotta monkeypatch that thing! #{Rails.root}/lib/extensions/spree/product.rb Spree::Product.class_eval do |variable| has_many :somethings , class_name: Something ,:foreign_key => "something_id" end /#{Rails.root}/config/application.rb config.autoload_paths += %W(#{config.root}/lib/extensions)


3

Here's how you do it: result = subject.gsub( /(.) # Match a single character, capture it in group 1 \1{2,} # Match the same character 2 or more times, as many as possible/x, '\1') # Replace with the one captured character Result: > subject = "happyyyy daaaaays!!!" => "happyyyy daaaaays!!!" > result = subject.gsub(/(.)\1{2,}/, ...


2

You are calling a recipe from another cookbook, so you need to add it as a dependency in your cookbook's metadata. Add the following line to the metadata.rb file (in the divups cookbook): depends "apt"


2

I would suggest to have a better database structure, so you don't use need to use user#{N}_id to find users. Presumably, I would split the table you have into two, where each table has user_id. You can paste some code, so I can help you with that. The second point, it seems that model operations are currently done in Controller, you might want to move ...


2

That is what Array#values_at is for: indices = [0,2] p ["a", "b", "c", "a"].values_at(*indices) # => ["a", "c"]


2

It looks like when you're sending a tag (params[:tag]) it is fetching posts with @posts = Post.tagged_with(params[:tag]) which is lacking the will paginate call. I believe you could get it working by adding the will paginate scope, like this: @posts = Post.tagged_with(params[:tag]).paginate(...)


2

This error is happening because you are copying the existing image to a new image instance which has no id. Naturally the database will throw a primary key exception. Why are you doing it this way? Why don't you update the existing image? If you must, you can delete the old image before saving the new one. @image = Image.new(image_params) @image.id = ...


2

You could use rotate: a.rotate(new_index).cycle { ... } (NOTE: I don't think you need the .each)


2

rotate is the correct answer, but the reason your code wasn't working was because you were trying to concatenate the last part of the array and a.cycle, which is an Enumerator and probably not what you wanted. Furthermore, your code would output [3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4] (if you fixed the other part) because you don't slice off the end when you concatenate the rest ...


1

I came across this issue just now when installing Rails on my MacBook. I opened the /usr/bin/ directory and opened the "rails" file in a text editor. Here's the result. #!/usr/bin/ruby # Stub rails command to load rails from Gems or print an error if not installed. require 'rubygems' version = ">= 0" if ARGV.first =~ /^_(.*)_$/ and ...


1

Here is another way to do it: res = Hash.new { |h, k| h[k] = {} } hash.each do |kstring, datehash| datehash.each { |kdate, n| n == 0 ? res[kdate] : res[kdate][kstring] = n } end


1

I believe this does what you want. h = {"string1" => {"date1" => 1, "date2" => 21, "date3" => 9}, "string2" => {"date1" => 23, "date2" => 88, "date3" => 2}, "string3" => {"date1" => 0, "date2" => 0, "date3" => 5}} h.each_with_object({}) { |(k,v),g| v.each { |d,vv| (g[d] ||= {}).update({ k=>vv }) } } ...


1

You are looking for strftime, not strptime. <%= @date_variable.strftime('%d-%m-%Y %H:%M') Note the %i you have doesn't seem to match up, check the docs to make sure you have the right format string.


1

Looking at some Github code I can see that STDOUT.flush is used mostly for server-side/multi-threaded jobs, and not in everyday use. Generally speaking, when you want to accept input from the user, you'd want to use gets.chomp. Just remember, no matter what the user enters, Ruby will ALWAYS interpreter that as a string. To convert it to an integer, you need ...


1

This is my solution: <%= call.datetime.strftime('%m/%d/%Y') %>


1

"Flushing" the output ensures that it shows the printed message before it waits for your input; this may be just someone being certain unnecessarily, or it may be that on certain operating systems you need it. Alternatively you can use STDOUT.sync = true to force a flush after every output. (You may wonder, "Why wouldn't I always use this?" Well, if your ...


1

Yes, this can be done with Sinatra. Any route can return data from the server to the client; by default this is sent with a text/html mime type, but you can also return plain text with an appropriate mime type: post "echo" do content_type :text request['your_input_name'] end If you want to echo more than just one value back, you can see all the ...


1

Are you also using minitest? Try changing the version in your gemfile to e.g.: gem 'minitest', '~> 4.0'


1

You could create an initialize method for the class Book (borrowing @falsetru's nice way of capitalizing the the words in title). First note that Book does not have its own initialize method;; Book = Struct.new(:title, :content) #=> Book Book.private_instance_methods(false) #=> [] Rather, it inherits from Struct: ...


1

You missed do word. Correct syntax: = link_to venue_path("XYZ") do .content do is a required statement when the block is passed. Seems link_to to work in an unpredictable way if you pass a block without do (how could it work at all? o_O). http://apidock.com/rails/ActionView/Helpers/UrlHelper/link_to


1

You can pull out the old value via model.original_attributes. Something like this should work for your case: car = Listing.all(type: :car).first car.price = 100 old_price = car.original_attributes[Listing.properties[:price]] # => 200 You should be able to put that in a before save hook and run your calculations and notifications from there. HTH :) ...


1

Regex is not suited very well to parse grammars and validate input. Regex is just meant for string pattern matching. Use a parser for validating the syntax of a input, in your case try ruby's URI. It's part of the 1.8.7 default libary


1

MVC To further BroiState's amazing answer, you need to appreciate how Rails works as a framework - MVC: MVC is one of the core aspects of Rails - it's how your data is processed & shown on the screen. The problem for many people is they don't realize the value of this system, and consequently don't realize how to get Rails to work as they require. ...


1

You could try the below regex to match the URL's which satisfy the above criteria. (?:https?:\/\/)?[^\W\s_]+\.?[^\W\s_]+\.(?:com|org|me)(?:\/[^\W\s_]+)? DEMO



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