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6

From the docs you referenced, average is meant to be called on the Movie model itself, not an instance of it. This will return the average of the column. @avg_review = Movie.average(:rating) You can also add conditions to the query (I made up a column for demonstration purposes): # Get average of movie ratings from 2015 @avg_review = ...


4

I think you need to pass block to fetch in order to not see Initializing sky: @sky = args.fetch(:sky) {Sky.new({})} the idea behind this is that when you call any method, initially its params (in this case Sky.new({})) will be invoked. When you pass block - it will be invoked after inside method fetch, not before.


4

As you've probably already seen, the documentation for the min method says: min(n) → array min(n) {| a,b | block } → array Returns the object in enum with the minimum value. The first form assumes all objects implement Comparable; the second uses the block to return a <=> b. This means that, in the first form, min is calling the ...


3

Nope. You can definitely use factory_girl, because it is awesome and actively maintained. For example, I am using Rails 4.2.3 and ruby-2.2.2 along with factory_girl-4.5.0 which is working nicely.


3

I think you want this: if defined?(var) && var.present? :var will always be defined as it's a symbol. > defined?(:var) => "expression" > defined?(var) => nil > var = 1 => 1 > defined?(var) => "local-variable"


3

If you are using RSpec 3, you can use ordered messages = ['A', 'B', 'C'] messages.each do |message| expect(STDOUT).to receive(puts).with(message).ordered end


2

This should help you http://apidock.com/rails/ActiveRecord/CounterCache/ClassMethods/reset_counters # For Post with id #1 records reset the comments_count Post.reset_counters(1, :comments) Resets one or more counter caches to their correct value using an SQL count query. This is useful when adding new counter caches, or if the counter has been ...


2

The "ruby-ish" way would be each (1...10).each do |i| puts i end or to double iterate (1...10).each do (1...10).each do |j| puts j end end As @maxwilliams and @sawa point out, (1...10) is 1 through 9 inclusive, (1..10) is 1 through 10 inclusive.


2

In IRB there is: conf.echo = false In Pry you could replace the print object with an empty proc: _pry_.config.print = proc {} You'll have to store the old print object in order to restore it. In both cases, the result of the last expression is still available via _


2

If all you want is to provide a default Sky object when key :sky is omitted, then fetch is a sub-optimal choice. This will work better: @sky = args[:sky] || Sky.new({}) The "problem" with fetch is that this will result in a nil sm.sky: sm = ShadowMask.new(sky: nil) If this is desired behaviour for you, then use fetch. If not, use ||.


2

No "Type" Required for POROs The biggest issue I have is I don't know what type to provide, because it is not a :model. I would just manually create the file, but again: I don't know what :type to provide inside the file. You don't need to specify a type for plain Ruby objects. The :type tells the RSpec Rails extensions loaded by the rails_helper ...


2

request.headers does not return a hash, but an instance of ActionDispatch::Http::Headers, which is a wrapper around rack env. ActionDispatch::Http::Headers implements many methods like [] and []= which make it behave like a hash, but it doesn't override the default inspect, hence you can't see the key-value pairs by just p or pp it. You can, however, see ...


2

The documentation says: Supported Rails versions are listed in Appraisals. Rails 4.2 is listed.


2

min passes two elements a and b from the array to the block and the block is expected to return -1, 0, or +1 depending on whether a is less than, equal to, or greater than b. The "spaceship" operator <=> returns these -1, 0, or +1 values. The algorithm is easy. Given a comparison function: cmp = -> (a, b) { a.length <=> b.length } We start ...


2

Tweak your call to look like this: ..., query: { query_key => bar } You have to use the older hash rocket syntax if your key is not a symbol.


1

You have to do it with string interpolation i.e. #{self.id} instead of self.id: def create_prizes Deal.transaction do self.120000.times do |i| CONNEXION.execute "INSERT INTO deal_prizes (deal_id, created_at, updated_at) values ( #{self.id}, '2009-01-23 20:21:13', '2009-01-23 20:21:13')" end end ...


1

It should be: CONNEXION.execute "INSERT INTO deal_prizes (deal_id, created_at, updated_at) values ( #{self.id}, '2009-01-23 20:21:13', '2009-01-23 20:21:13')" But it's not a recommended approach. You should never interpolate parameters like this. The better approach is: st = CONNEXION.raw_connection.prepare("INSERT INTO deal_prizes (deal_id, created_at, ...


1

#attributes returns an object in hash representation, #slice returns a hash containing only the given keys, so: item.attributes.slice('name', 'detail')


1

Not really "arcane behavior of ruby". But the result of the last line in a method is what the method returns. Putting a puts in that position will usually break the method.


1

Be careful not to confuse the Moped syntax with the Mongoid syntax. For Mongoid, the docs describe the find method: Find a document or multiple documents by their ids. Will raise an error by default if any of the ids do not match If you really want every record, Invoice.all can do the trick. (Also be careful with your find_by method. The Mongoid syntax ...


1

You don't say what version of RVM you're running but RVM is plenty capable of handling the problem. From the documentation: Is rvm get stable not working? Is rvm get latest telling you You already have the latest version! , but you know you don't? Try this: $ rvm get head $ rvm reload $ rvm get stable If that does not work for you, you ...


1

touch spec/services/my_poro_spec.rb ? You don't need generators for everything. ;)


1

defined? expect you to pass the expression, not a Symbol. The Symbol will always return true. 2.1.5 :001 > defined? var => nil 2.1.5 :002 > defined? :var => "expression" 2.1.5 :003 > var = nil => nil 2.1.5 :004 > defined? var => "local-variable" Hence <% if defined?(var) && var.present? %> <%= var.value ...


1

According to the average method documentation. it's a method for ActiveRecord::Calculations so you should use it on ActiveRecord collections or on the model directly, but you trying to use it on instance: Wrong: @avg_review = @movie.average(:rating) Right: @avg_review = Movie.average(:rating)


1

I needed a question mark before <end_val> for it to work as a named capture. Without the preceding question mark it was treated as part of the regular expression. "red blue".match /red(?<end_val> |(\$\d{1,3}(,\d{3})*\.\d{2}))blue/ # => #<MatchData "red blue" end_val:" ">


1

Why not do a nested loop? for i in 1...10 for j in 1...10 puts i end end By the way, the Ruby equivalent is for i in 1...10, not for i in 1..10.


1

Make a rake task that uses your factories to create your debug data. For example, if you had a model (and corresponding factory) named Report: namespace :db do desc "Fill database with debug data" task :debug_data => :environment do puts "Destroy existing data?" if STDIN.gets.chomp.upcase == 'Y' if Rails.env.production? raise "\nI'm ...


1

Try this! set :database, 'sqlite3:///dev.db'


1

You cannot reuse the same name for a Class and a Module. Internally, in Ruby modules are represented as class structures therefore they share the same object space. Moreover, when you define a Module/Class, you can access the name as a constant. class Report def foo p "report" end end Report => Report defined? Report => "constant" in ...


1

I don't know if you're missing smtp settings for development/production environment. If so, try default: &default email_delivery: smtp_settings: # Your settings development: <<: *default production: <<: *default # Override default settings if necessary user_name: "redmine@othersite.ru" password: "otherpass" Since ...



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