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4

Apparently, at least one of your User records doesn't have its Account associated, so user.account returns nil. Answering directly to your question: No it has nothing to do with your controller (controller code is correct). If you let users without accounts exist, you can avoid error with Object#try method: <%= user.account.try(:name) %> This ...


4

Array#sort can do this criteria = [:points, :goals] array.sort_by { |entry| criteria.map { |c| entry[c] } } #=> [{:id=>1, :name=>"A", :points=>20, :victories=>4, :goals=>5}, # {:id=>1, :name=>"B", :points=>20, :victories=>4, :goals=>8}, # {:id=>1, :name=>"C", :points=>21, :victories=>5, :goals=>8}] ...


3

I have no problem with your code going in ApplicationController, if it's only a few lines of code. However, I'd suggest you check the difference between 401 and 403. The main difference is that 401 means there was an error with your authentication attempt, please try again; whereas 403 means you are trying to authenticate in a way that is incorrect so ...


3

The reason for this error is that @address is nil To fix you need to instantiate in the controller # orders_controller.rb def new @address = Address.new end def edit @address = Address.find params[:id] end


3

You want .map, not .each. Each iterates. Map translates one thing into another. [ session[:cart].map do |product| price = product[0].price.to_i*100 { name: product[0].name, description: product[0].description, quantity: product[1], amount: product[0].price } end ]


3

To group by section, and order by order you can do the following: items.sort_by(&:order).group_by(&:section).to_a # => [["part one", [item1, item3]], ["part two", [item2]]] sort_by orders all the items according to the order attribute, while group_by groups them into a hash of arrays, each key is a different section. to_a turns the hash into an ...


2

Reject doesn't have any context to know what is or isn't already in there to remove duplicates. Using the uniq method, and provide what's unique about the row, for example: @ips_events.uniq { |e| [e[:signature_id], e[:attacker], e[:ips_target]] } Should get you where you need to be.


2

In your example, BookTitle is not defined as a class method. To define a class method, you prefix the method name with self. (there are also other methods, though perhaps not worth worrying about for now). However, I think you are referring to instance methods rather than class methods. You cannot directly call your BookTitle method because you have ...


2

You can do: if params[:search_term].present? redirect_to admin_job_job_products_path(@job, search_term: params[:search_term]) else redirect_to admin_job_job_products_path(@job) end Or redirect_to admin_job_job_products_path(@job, params[:search_term].present? search_term: params[:search_term] : nil) References: .present? method documentation ...


2

The dollar sign is a reserved character. There's this RFC here which lists the dollar sign as a reserved sub-delimiter (page 12), in case the above link does not seem credible enough. Interestingly enough when I was searching for information on whether the dollar sign was reserved or not, I came across this meta question. The first article above is found ...


2

You can check this in db/schema.rb file. If you aren't sure, you can run bundle exec rake db:schema:dump previously - this rake task recreates schema.rb file from database. According to your edited question, you should generate the following migrations: bundle exec rails g migration add_user_id_to_expense_pictures user:references bundle exec rails g ...


2

Multi-dimension arrays are accessed like so: [2] pry(main)> array = [["WEB-APPLICATION-ATTACK", 280],["RDP-ATTACK", 528]] => [["WEB-APPLICATION-ATTACK", 280], ["RDP-ATTACK", 528]] [3] pry(main)> array[0] => ["WEB-APPLICATION-ATTACK", 280] [4] pry(main)> array[0][0] => "WEB-APPLICATION-ATTACK" [5] pry(main)> array[0][1] => 280 [6] ...


2

According to this issue on Github: https://github.com/mperham/sidekiq/issues/1732 you now need to require 'sidekiq/api'


2

You should be able to do People.joins(:assignments).where(assignments: { type: %w[finished started] })


1

You could try splitting your search term by spaces and calling where for each of them. In Arel this will keep adding filters to your sql with AND... Assuming your model is called Candidate query = Candidate params[:search_term].split(' ').each do |term| query = query.where('title like %?%', term) end # check it's worked puts query.to_sql result = ...


1

I would just generate a random string and assign it while it doesn't exist. Before I get into that let me just mention that SecureRandom.uuid is the best way to go. It generates random uuids whose chance of collision are mathematically improbable. Anyway, here is a way to use your own custom random string generator that will only assign if it doesn't ...


1

The problem is conceptual. Devise is only an Authentication library not an Authorization library. You have to implement this separately or use CanCan. Fret not however, it is easy in your case to implement this since you only have one role. Guard your user create/update/destroy action with a before filter: class UsersController < ApplicationController ...


1

Something like this in your routes file will match the first URL pattern match ":username/post/:post_id", to: "users_posts#index" and give you params[:username] and params[:post_id] variables in your controller. Think very carefully about putting a variable (:username) as the first part of a route, though. You'll have to make sure your app never needs a ...


1

Change <title>Ruby on Rails Sample App | <%= yield(:title) %></title> to <title>Ruby on Rails Tutorial Sample App | <%= yield(:title) %></title> as this is what you are testing for with rspec.


1

You have set private on the second line which is what is preventing you from accessing this method. You could declare the method above the private line and it would be public.


1

You have set BookTitle to be a private method. A private method is one that can only be called within the class itself or by instances of the class (there are exceptions). If you take the private out, it should work. Some side notes: Ruby convention has method names as lower-case, with words separated by underscores, so you should name your method ...


1

your method is private, thus you can not access it in global scope (see this irb extract): irb(main):001:0> class Book irb(main):002:1> private irb(main):003:1> def BookTitle irb(main):004:2> puts "this books title" irb(main):005:2> end irb(main):006:1> end => nil irb(main):007:0> irb(main):008:0* a = Book.new => ...


1

I suggest doing it like this. Code def sort_it(array,*keys) array.map { |h| [h.values_at(*keys), h] }.sort_by(&:first).map(&:last) end Examples For array as given by you: sort_it(array, :goals, :victories) #=> [{:id=>1, :name=>"A", :points=>20, :victories=>4, :goals=>5}, # {:id=>1, :name=>"B", :points=>20, ...


1

Actually the problem comes from ActiveResource configuration, I have to manually add include_root_in_json = true in my object for the method to work. I don't know if this is a normal behavior, but I'll comment it on redmine wiki also.


1

Write it like this: File.open("debug.txt", "w") do |out| File.foreach("main_file.rb") do |line| if line['DEBUG'] puts line out.puts line end end end You need to: Open the output file. Iterate over the lines in the input file. For each line, check to see if it contains the string you want. If so, write it. Loop until the input ...


1

Another solution, pretty clear. def integer_and_decimal_part(float) integer = float.to_i decimal = float - float.to_i [integer, decimal] end def calculate(float) months, months_decimal = integer_and_decimal_part(float) weeks, weeks_decimal = integer_and_decimal_part(4*(months_decimal)) days = (7*weeks_decimal).to_i {months: ...


1

You're overwriting the file every time you find a DEBUG line in main_file. You have your blocks backwards. The File.open('debug.txt') should be outside of the File.readlines. Like this: log_file = File.open("main_file.rb") File.open("debug.txt", "w") do |out| File.readlines(log_file).each do |line| if line.include? "DEBUG" puts line ...


1

You can use values_at: criteria = ["goals", "victories"] criteria = criteria.map(&:to_sym) array = array.group_by do |key| key.values_at(*criteria) end.sort_by(&:first).map(&:last) # => [[{:id=>1, :name=>"A", :points=>20, :victories=>4, :goals=>5}, # {:id=>1, :name=>"B", :points=>20, :victories=>4, ...


1

The Date class of Ruby offers a lot of methods: first_of_month = Date.current.beginning_of_month last_of_next_month = (Date.current + 1.months).end_of_month Billing.where('your_date_field BETWEEN ? AND ?', first_of_month, last_of_next_month) You want it to work with DateTime ? first_of_month = Date.current.beginning_of_month.beginning_of_day ...


1

I've found my mistake. The code was: logowanie.fields[0] = 'login' logowanie.fields[1] = 'password' And it had to be: logowanie.fields[0].value = 'login' logowanie.fields[1].value = 'password'



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