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4

map creates a new array containing the values returned by the block. times iterates the given block provided number of times and returns the number of iterations it made. (3 in your case) In the following case the return value is 3: val = 3.times do dog.bark end Wow! Wow! Wow! # => 3 val # => 3 However when map is used, you would get an array ...


4

They are simply class method calls, here desc and here is options defined on the Thor class.


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The methods you mention (e.g. desc) form part of Thor's DSL and act as convenience methods for . The method name desc in particular was taken wholesale from Rake. I'd encourage you to read the source files for Thor to understand how the DSL has been implemented.


4

The String#reverse! method returns the string it is called on so a == a.reverse! is the same as saying a.reverse! a == a and of course a == a is true. Note that it doesn't matter in the least what reverse! does to the string, what matters to == in o == o.m is what the method (m) returns.


4

i=2 while i != "5" do puts "insert an integer. 5 to end" i = gets.chomp puts "you entered #{i}" end puts "program end" You're getting a string from the user, therefore i != 5 always evaluates to false. You can turn it to i != "5" or convert your string to an integer.


3

Okay, instead of trying to stuff my answers in comments, I'll just give an answer, even though it's not quite an "answer". All of your alternatives are not equivalent, they all do different things. What are you actually trying to do? some_variable = true if another_variable Will set some_variable = true only if another_variable has a truthy value. In ...


3

a == a.reverse! # => true Is because a.reverse! is executed before comparision. a.reverse! performs internal string reversing. After this operation is done, a became a string, containing raboof. Since String#reverse! returned the result of reversion, the strings (raboof on the left side as soon as a was already changed by call to #reverse!, and ...


2

deliver_later uses ActiveJob to provide asynchronous execution. However ActiveJob does not provide asynchronicity itself - it is a unifying api layer that can be fulfilled by many backends. The default one just runs everything inline it is not async. To get async usage you need to pick an asynchronous backend. You can configure the backend in your ...


2

You don't need that true if <var> part and can use !!instead: if something some_variable = !!another_variable your_variable = !!that_other_variable elsif thatthing my_variable = !!another_variable her_variable = !!that_other variable else puts "nothing found" end


2

The questions you are asking here is really about the basics of how classes, methods, and objects work within Ruby. What you have going on is really just the difference between class methods and instance methods. An instance method means in the most basic sense that the method can only be called from the level of an instantiated object. This is what you ...


2

You aren't keeping any references to the objects, so Ruby is garbage-collecting them. Also, don't use ObjectSpace to find your items, it's mainly for debug and introspection tasks. I would alter lib/devices.rb to use a Ruby constant, like this class USBSK ALL_DEVICES = [ self.new(1), self.new(1), self.new(1, '192.168.1.127') ...


2

gets.chomp returns a String, so i is never equal to 5, a Fixnum. You need to convert it to an integer: i = gets.chomp.to_i


2

You can write it in one line : predicate = parsed['PREDICATE'] unless parsed['PREDICATE'].nil? Just a tip : Favor modifier if/unless usage when you have a single-line body. Or, a guess, if you are checking if a key exist, then assign the value of the key to the var, then you might consider : predicate = parsed['PREDICATE'] if parsed.has_key? ...


2

I think what you're doing is probably a mistake and a terrible design, but for your specific question if you actually want a method object, I think you want: type_method = Commerce::LineItem.instance_method(:ssm) You could then call it by: bound_type_method = comerce.line_item.bind(type_method).call(varName).set(value) But this doesn't make a lot of ...


2

Interesting question! According to the documentation, binding: Returns a Binding object, describing the variable and method bindings at the point of call. Since you are returning a Binding object from within a method, that binding can be used to access the variables at the point of the method call. This includes arguments that were passed to the ...


2

It seems like you need to assign some probabilities here to your importance levels. Maybe redefine your data structure like this test = { (0..49) => [ # most important "lorem", "ipsum" ], (50..79) => [ # semi important "dolor", "sit" ], (80..99) => [ # least important "amet", "consectetur" ] } Then do something ...


2

I think you are asking for this: <ul class="nav navbar-nav"> ... <li> <%= link_to "Sign Up", sign_up_path, class: "page-scroll" %> </li> <li> <%= link_to "Log In", log_in_path, class: "page-scroll" %> </li> ... </ul> Have a look at the Api reference for link_to, it has a bunch ...


1

According to the site you set up your gallery like <div id="gallery"> <a href="path/to/image1.jpg"><img src="path/to/image1_thumbnail.jpg" /></a> <a href="path/to/image2.jpg"><img src="path/to/image2_thumbnail.jpg" /></a> <a href="path/to/image3.jpg"><img src="path/to/image3_thumbnail.jpg" ...


1

It looks like it's not necessarily complaining about your URL, but instead about some sort of response URL: https://github.com/ruby-openstack/ruby-openstack/blob/v1.1.2/lib/openstack/connection.rb#L399 uri = URI.parse(response["x-server-management-url"]) You could try getting into that gem's code on your local machine and adding some logging/debugging to ...


1

Passing methods as arguments and changing their receivers is not as easy to do in Ruby as it is in, say, Javascript, nor is it as conventional. Instead, usually when this sort of thing needs to be done, the Ruby convention is to use blocks. E.g. if you defined your auto_update method like this def auto_update(doc_num, var_name, value) raise ArgumentError, ...


1

You are trying to run "rake db:create:all" which would create your database but as error states - it seems you don't have your config/database.yml file. It's a configuration file that tells rails how to connect to your database. You can read more about it here. If you really want to run bundle install, just use "bundle install" command instead. This will ...


1

It seems you have no config/database.yml file in your project's directory. Why I think so? Follow me ... Could not load database configuration. No such file - /home/.gem/ruby/2.1.3/gems/railties-4.1.5/lib/rails/application/configuration.rb:105:in `database_configuration' Ok, let's take a look at this code where we have error: yaml = ...


1

There is no support in rubygems/bundler for having two distinct parallel version numbers, no. But there's no reason you have to use semver. You just need one version number. Bundler and rubygems will work fine with any version numbers of the form 'x.y.z', or even 'x.y' or 'x.y.z.a.b', where all components are numbers. As far as 'functioning', you can do ...


1

That's because you're trying to make a string negative, try following code: testNew = test.sort_by{|n| [-n[1].to_i,n[0]]} Assuming that n[1] is always convertible to a number.


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Your latest backtrace show that your don't specify host address of MongoDB. Read this section about configuration Mongoid gem. Update Maybe your mongoid.yml has incorrect format. Update 2 Run the following commands in irb console and provide output: $ ~ irb 2.1.0 :001 > require 'resolv' => true 2.1.0 :002 > Resolv::Hosts::DefaultFileName ...


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I would do that like this: File.open('filename.txt', 'w') do |file| file.write(Hash[(1..100).map { |i| [i, 10] }]) end


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Operators are applied in order of their precedence. It's not that the right side is (always) evaluated first, it's that addition has higher precedence than assignment. Run irb to test. $ irb 2.2.0 :001 > x # => the variable 'x' doesn't yet exist. NameError: undefined local variable or method `x' for main:Object from (irb):1 from ...


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You can use Scenario Hooks to get steps for each scenario: After do |scenario| scenario.steps.each { |s| puts s.to_sexp } end


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A simple example should explain how this works: class Thor def self.desc(description) puts "DESC: #{description}" end end class MyCLI < Thor desc "Hello world" end Output: DESC: Hello world See here for the definition of desc in Thor itself: Thor def desc on GitHub


1

Not sure exactly what you are looking for here. Is it any reason to make the API call from the javascript? If you have all the info on the controller side, you can use RestClient to make an easy call: response = RestClient.post( "https://api.appery.io/rest/1/db/collections/Menu/", nil, :content_type => :json, :accept => :json, ...



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