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6

This is the problem which keyword arguments (new to ruby 2) were made to solve (provided that you control the method definition). def foo(a: {}, b: {}) "a: #{a}, b: #{b}" end foo # => "a: {}, b: {}" foo(a: 1, b: 2) # => "a: 1, b: 2" foo(a: 3) # => "a: 3, b: {}" foo(b: 4) # => "a: {}, b: 4"


4

In Ruby it is idiomatic to use the methods provided by the Enumerable module which are mixed into the Array class instead of using traditional for-loops: animals.each_with_index { |x,i| puts "#{x}[#{i}]" } # => animals # bear[0] # ruby[1] # peacock[2] # kangaroo[3] # whale[4] # platypus[5] The PickAxe Book mentions this in its section about Blocks and ...


4

You can specify which capture group you want with a second argument to []: string = "Looking for the ^[cows]" footnote = string[/\^\[(.*?)\]/, 1] # footnote == "cows"


3

You can do nearly the same as the javascript version lambda do |;x| x = 42 end.call puts x #=> NameError Note that there is a subtle difference between the above and lambda do x = 42 end.call if there is no local variable x in the outer scope the two behave the same. However if there was such a local variable then the second snippet would can ...


3

Try (result.methods - Object.public_instance_methods).sort , where result is the variable name of the object in question. Although it would still be better to find the documentation for it and look there.


3

random_array.group_by {|x|x[:number]}.values.map {|x|x.reduce(:merge)} # => [ # {:number=>123, :x=>2, :y=>7, :z=>2}, # {:number=>456, :a=>3, :b=>4, :c=>0} # ] Or, including the substitution of the :number key for :time: def transform(arr) groups = arr.group_by {|x|x[:number]}.values.map {|x|x.reduce(:merge)} groups.each ...


3

Your rescue is catching the wrong thing. You perform the go operation, it assigns the next room; but it is nil. The thing that then fails is looking up the description on a nil. Instead of catching the error of failed room description lookup, you need to prevent the assignment if the room does not exist. EDIT: Something like this might be okay. def ...


3

This should work: b.in_time_zone.time_zone


2

Use Array#select to identify the elements that have both "id" and "label" then Array#map to pluck only the "ids". hash = JSON.parse(your_json_string) hash['menu']['items'].select { |h| h && h['id'] && h['label'] }.map {|h| h['id']} # => [0, 46] A more cleaned up version could look like this def ids_with_label(json_str) hash = ...


2

Solution: Install Ruby 64 bit Instal DevKit 64 bit Update rubygems - gem install rubygems-update Use: C:\RubyDevKit>gem list for local gems


2

You are going to want to separate those concerns. What I mean is: Make a separate Answer model and migration so you can create an 'answers' table in your database. That way you can put this in your Question model: has_many :answers and in your Answer model: belongs_to :question I'd say this is the proper way to achieve what you are looking for.


2

class YourModel scope :survey3, -> { where(survey3_low_percent: nil).reorder(low_income_percent: :desc) } scope :low, -> { where(low_income_percent: nil).reorder(survey3_low_percent: :desc) } def self.new_order survey3.to_a + low.to_a end end or ...


2

This is because of spring which has shipped with rails by default for a little while now. You might notice that the second time you run rails c is a lot faster than the first time. This is because the first time you run a springified script your app is loaded as normal and then forks to run what you requested. The second time around this loader script can ...


2

You can get rid of some if conditions and get a cleaner code by using regular expressions to replace not needed parts of the string: def arrival_and_departure_months(travel_report) if travel_report.arrival_date && travel_report.departure_date output = I18n.l(travel_report.arrival_date, :format => '%B %Y') + ...


2

title only returns visible text (you can pass :all to ask for all text). The native method returns the underlying object from the driver - behaviour may vary occording to which driver you use (poltergeist, rack::test) etc.


2

You can use modulus division as below where n refers to the nth line you want to process and i refers to the 0-based index for the file lines. Using those two values, modulo math provides the remainder from integer division which will be 0 whenever the 1-based index (i+1) is multiple of n. n = 3 # modify every 3rd line File.open('edit_fr.txt','w') do |f| ...


2

Think of it like this. unsorted = [1, 3, 2, 5, 4] sorted = [] unsorted.max is 5. Delete that and push it onto sorted. unsorted = [1, 3, 2, 4] sorted = [5] unsorted.max is 4. Delete that and push it onto sorted. unsorted = [1, 3, 2] sorted = [5, 4] I think you can see where the mistake lies. push adds to the end of an array, so you want to ...


2

That's a segfault - Ruby (or one of your libraries with native extensions) has hit a bug. You should check to see if there are newer versions of any of your libraries with extensions available. If not, then consider trying to narrow down exactly which instruction is causing the issue, and submit a bug report to the project maintainer responsible. If you ...


2

start rails server rails s and monitor the logs. Now try accessing the page which points to the place where debugger is written in the code The log will stop at a point where you have put the debugger/byebug word. You can print out variables at that instant


2

As extending saying - Used to extend a scope with additional methods, either through a module or through a block provided. The object returned is a relation, which can be further extended. Here is an little example to illustrate this functionality: Spree::Order.class_eval do def self.scope_cart self.where(currency: "INR").extending do def ...


2

If we take your example, and "flip" it: module Lifeforms::Animals::Person # stuff goes here # and it doesn't all have to be deeply indented end module Lifeforms module Animals end end It fails with NameError: uninitialized constant Lifeforms "Nested" syntax defines module if it doesn't exist, but the "::" syntax relies on fact, that the ...


1

Check out this link: Creating a many to many relationship in Rails 3 In your case, your code should probably look like this: # app/models/post.rb class Post < ActiveRecord::Base belongs_to :user has_and_belongs_to_many :categories end # app/models/category.rb class Category < ActiveRecord::Base has_and_belongs_to_many :posts end # ...


1

You can't change this behaviour: the browser is trying to connect to https://www.example.com but your certificate is for a different domain. Your application isn't involved at all at this point. The only way to deal with this would be to have an ssl certificate that is valid for both www.example.com and example.com


1

Is this what you're looking for? You've already got classes on the strong tags that you can use. CSS: body {color:black;} .stat {color:yellow;}


1

You could also use a lambda: case cool_hash when -> (h) { h[:key] == 'something' } puts 'something' else puts 'something else' end


1

You have several ways to go about it: 1. animals.each_with_index do |key,index| puts "#{key}[#{index}]" end 2. animals.each_index do |index| puts "#{animals[index]}[#{index}]" end 3. i = 0 animals.each do |animal| puts "#{animal}[#{i}]" i += 1 end 4. for i in 0..animals.length puts "#{animals[i]}[#{i}]" end


1

You can write it as animals.each_index { |ind| puts "animal-#{animals[ind]} at #{ind}" }


1

I think you are over complicating this, and based on the information provided I don't think we need to concern ourselves the user model. you can do something like this def populate_form visual = Visual.find_by_id(params[:emp_id]) if visual render :json => { :emp_first_name => visual.first_name } else render :json => { ...


1

Unless there is some special Ruby voodoo that I've never seen I'm pretty sure the simple answer is you can't. However, the next best approach (instead of assigning the array to a variable) is to extend the Array class and write an extra method, like so: class Array def flatten_and_slice flattened_result = self.flatten(1) ...


1

Using p = STDIN.gets '\n' was getting appended. Instead you can use gets.chomp. Also you need to use File.expand_path. Check the example below. # My irb 1.9.3-p545 :002 > p = gets.chomp ~/.ssh => "~/.ssh" 1.9.3-p545 :003 > File.directory?(p) => false 1.9.3-p545 :004 > File.exists? File.expand_path(p) => true



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