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5

In your example Date.today.year is evaluated only once, when the class is loaded and doesn't change anymore. When you use a lambda in your validator declaration, it re-evaluates the block each time when it validates the attribute: validates :year, numericality: { only_integer: true, less_than_or_equal_to: ->(_brewery){ Date.current.year } } ...


5

You will use the method slice. Slice a hash to include only the given keys. Returns a hash containing the given keys. Your code will be. Resource.first.attributes.slice("foo", "bar", "baz") # with .where Resource.where(foo: 1).select("foo, bar, baz").map(&:attributes)


4

try to write like this def new_dasherize tr('_', '-') end Its same as self.tr('_', '-'), where self is a String class instance in this case.


3

Your code is effectively same as below after first iteration of loop, which is a infinite loop while nil.try(:reify).try(:reason).try(:name).blank? # always true # ... end Your web server gives up while waiting for loop to terminate and hence reports - 504 - Gateway timeout to user/browser. try allows you to invoke a method on a nil objects without ...


3

So you really have two options. The first, and most likely to be accurate, is to ask the user through their browser via javascript, what their location is. HTML5 allows you to do this through geolocation: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Geolocation/Using_geolocation The basics are as follows: ...


3

Yes. SomeModule.instance_variable_get(:@param)


3

I'd do something like this: str = <<EOT Adresse de prise en charge : Adresse d'arrivée : rue des capucines rue des tilleuls 92210 Saint Cloud 67000 Strasbourg Tél.: Tél.: EOT ...


3

You need to move the instructors assignment outside of the method, otherwise there's no point in allowing it as an argument. Also, delete using the x argument instead of hardcoding the value: instructors = ["Josh", "Steven", "Sophie", "Steven", "Amanda", "Steven"] def using_delete(instructors, x="Steven") instructors.delete x instructors end


2

You can use String#to_i, which gives you the number at the start: str = '4,abcdefgh' str.match(/^(\d+),.{#{str.to_i}}/) # => #<MatchData "4,abcd" 1:"4">


2

Open3#popen3 will be useful. Assuming you have a test.rb file as shown below: v = gets.chomp puts "#{v} @ #{Time.new}" You could do: require "open3" stdin, stdout, stderr, wait_thr = Open3.popen3("ruby test.rb") stdin.puts("hi") puts stdout.gets(nil) #=> hi @ 2016-02-05 19:18:52 +0530 stdin.close stdout.close stderr.close For multiple ...


2

a is an array reference, so to push its value into b, you'll need to copy it: b.push(a.dup) This is similar to using strdup in C, where strings are pointers.


2

Your problem is in the line attr_accessor :contract,:start_time, :end_time, :source, :price I believe this interfere with the magic that ActiveRecord generates and it seems to me that the attr_accessor overwrites AR and makes setting any of the fields not possible. Remove this line and your code will work!


2

There isn't a magic way of doing this. If you look inside core_ext/string/inflections you can see that active support reopens the String class and does class String def dasherize ActiveSupport::Inflector.dasherize(self) end end


2

You can't really define things in terms of "covering" the OWASP Top 10 since they are categories of vulnerabilities, sometimes very broad. A1 Injection Brakeman detects SQL injection and command injection. A2 Broken Authentication and Session Management Brakeman warns about unsafe Basic Auth usage and poor session settings. However, A2 is really about ...


2

Use Hash#fetch: def foo_method(config) foo = config.fetch(:foo) bar = config.fetch(:bar) qux = config.fetch(:qux, {}) end foo_method({}) #=> key not found: :foo (KeyError) foo_method({foo: 1}) #=> key not found: :bar (KeyError) foo_method({foo: 1, bar: 2}) #=> no error You can also pass a block to fetch that is called ...


2

I'm not sure if this solves the actual problem, but to apply a binary operation, you can use reduce: sets_of_columns_with_data = [ [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [1, 2, 3, 4], [1, 2, 3], [1, 2] ] sets_of_columns_with_data.reduce(:&) #=> [1, 2]


2

Assuming that each address section in each line is indented as much as or further than the corresponding "Adresse" in the first line, the following can extract not only two addresses aligned sidewards, but n addresses in general. lines = string.split(/#{$/}+/) # => [ # => "Adresse de prise en charge : Adresse d'arrivée :", # ...


2

Assumptions I have assumed that the first and last lines are not wanted and the street names are separated by at least two spaces, and the same for the postal code/city strings. This permits the street name (and postal code/city pair) for "prise en charge" to end below "Adresse d'arrivée :". Code def parse_text(text) text.split(/\n+\s+/)[1..-2]. ...


2

str = " Adresse de prise en charge : Adresse d'arrivée : rue des capucines rue des tilleuls 92210 Saint Cloud 67000 Strasbourg Tél.: Tél.:" adr_prise, adr_arr = str.lines[3].strip.split(/ ...


2

Meditate on this: I wrote a little script containing: puts ARGV[0].class puts ARGV[1].class and saved it to disk, then ran it using: ruby ~/Desktop/tests/test.rb foo /abc/ which returned: String String The documentation says: The pattern is typically a Regexp; if given as a String, any regular expression metacharacters it contains will be ...


2

I would expect that a helper like this would work # in a helper def optional_block(block_name, &block) concat(content_for(block_name).presence || capture(&block)) end which could be used in the view like this: <% optional_block(:layoutBlock) %> # Content that is only rendered when content_for(:layoutBlock) is blank <% end %>


2

It's more obvious if you specify the "pad-string": puts 'test'.ljust(40, '<') puts 'test'.rjust(40, '>') puts 'test'.center(40, '-') puts 'test'.ljust(40, '<') + 'test'.rjust(40, '>') Output: test<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ...


2

The arrow -> is a short syntax to create lambas. See "What do you call the -> operator in Ruby?". An alternative way could be the following snippet: results.map { |object| object["name"] }


2

Use a begin/rescue block to rescue the error and output error info in red: URL_LIST = [ 'http://website.com', 'http://sdfasdfwqeasdfasdfr.com', 'http://website.net' ] URL_LIST.each do |url| item = "#{url}" begin resp = Net::HTTP.get_response(URI.parse(item)) case resp.code.to_i when 200 puts "Success: #{url}".green when ...


1

Store the required config keys as an array in a private method for the module, then subtract the passed config hash's keys from that, and see if the resulting array is empty, if not throw an error with the missing keys. module Example def foo_method(config) validate_config!(config) #do stuff end private def validate_config!(config) ...


1

Depending on your version of ruby, you could use keyword arguments? http://ruby-doc.org/core-2.1.0/doc/syntax/methods_rdoc.html#label-Keyword+Arguments Or, scale your current solution by looping over the required keys? %i{foo bar}.each do |k| raise(ArgumentError, "No #{k} config found", caller) unless config.has_key?(k) end


1

You're still getting an error because you've referenced comment.user.email, and user is nil. You need to check comment.user.nil?, or you're also at risk for deleting a comment just because a user's email is missing (though maybe you disallow that): <% if comment.user.nil? %> <% comment.destroy %> Cleaning up on the fly is going to be ...


1

You can use class variable instead instanse variable module SomeModule @@param = 'Hello' end module Reporter include SomeModule def self.put puts @@param end end Reporter.put prints 123 and returns nil in this case


1

@spickermann's recipe seems to be correct, I'll just try to explain why it works. The code you write inside your class is executed at compile time, when Ruby compiles to the VM bytecode. Therefore, the Date.today.year in your validator is calculated exactly once, when the class is compiled. By introducing the lambda you enable ActiveRecord to use the ...


1

You need to build the associated records def new @abonent = Abonent.new @abonent.numbers.build end



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