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13

i encountered the same error. It's introduced by sprockets-rails 2.1.4, that requires no more the /assets prefix for favicon_link_tag. Maybe for some reasons when spree 2.3.2 has been released, sprockets-rails gem was at 2.1.3 version. I fix it editing the Gemfile.lock, changing manually the version of sprockets-rails from 2.1.4 to 2.1.3 (in my specific ...


13

It's just how the === method works. It's directional and that applies to any class: "foo" === String # => false String === "foo" # => true This is because that evaluates to: "foo".send(:===, String) String.send(:===, "foo") Those are two different methods, one for the class, one for the instance. If you're only concerned with class information: ...


12

Why it happens? It seems like an attempt to at least test for, or exploit, a remote code execution vulnerability. Potentially a generic one (targeting a platform other than Rails), or one that existed in earlier versions. The actual error however stems from the fact that the request is an HTTP PUT with application/json headers, but the body isn't a valid ...


11

Your assumption that regex matches a longer alternation is incorrect. If you have a bit of time, let's look at how your regex works... Quick refresher: How regex works: The state machine always reads from left to right, backtracking where necessary. There are two pointers, one on the Pattern: (cdefghijkl|bcd) The other on your String: ...


10

You can use the product method to create the pairs and then join them: a1 = ['x','y','z'] a2 = [1,2] a1.product(a2).map {|p| p.join(':') }


10

As opposed to the way, e.g., Java functions, when you define classes in Ruby, Ruby is actually executing code. Kind of like Java's static blocks. So when you do e.g. class Foo puts(self) end you will open a class (i.e. change the current self to Foo), within its context do a puts (which will print out the Foo class object), and then close the class ...


9

y = 12 - x%12; works for all x from 1 to 12 inclusive. % is the C-style modulus operator, giving the remainder from dividing x by 12. That's zero if x is 12, and x for 1 to 11.


9

The difference in your code isn't about << vs. push, it's about the fact that you re-assign in one case and don't in the other. The following two pieces of code are equivalent: @connections = Hash.new [] @connections[1] = @connections[1].push(2) puts @connections # => {1=>[2]} @connections = Hash.new [] @connections[1] = (@connections[1] ...


8

There are three problems with your current code: "CEST" isn't a time zone Java recognized. Try Europe/Paris instead, as a European time zone java.util.Calendar uses 0-based months (yes, it's awful) You haven't cleared out the time part of the Calendar, so it'll give you the current time of day, on that date This works: import java.util.*; public class ...


8

Ruby String has method include? so it would be like: print 'tentacle'.include?('ten') ? 'it has' : 'None'


8

Sounds like a job for partition: partition { |obj| block } → [ true_array, false_array ] partition → an_enumerator Returns two arrays, the first containing the elements of enum for which the block evaluates to true, the second containing the rest. This should do the job: @open, @closed = @posts.partition { |p| p.status == 'Open' }


8

Like blasio pointed out. It seems like the Xfinity modems are setting up the search domain to home.network and this is messing things up for the reasons he mentioned. I had the same problem and the modification on resolv.conf seem to do the trick, and that should probably be an accepted solution for linux environments. I had this problem while attempting ...


8

You could take the intersection of two arrays, and see if it's not empty: ([2, 6, 13, 99, 27] & [2, 6]).any?


7

Arguments are always evaluated prior to a method call whereas a block is evaluated only during the method call at a timing controlled by the method (if it is ever evaluated). In your first example, the argument "abc" is evaluated once before the method new is called. The evaluated object is passed to the method new. The exact same object is used in the all ...


7

Try: dates.sort_by {|s| Date.strptime(s, '%m/%d/%Y') If you want it starting from the newest date: dates.sort_by {|s| Date.strptime(s, '%m/%d/%Y').reverse


7

I was under the impression that for Ruby > ~2.0.0, passing in the ampersand was optional and equivalent to just passing in the symbol. No, it's not. pluck(&:id) Is a shorthand for pluck { |u| u.id } i.e. you are passing a block. pluck however ignores the block, so the above is equivalent to pluck { } or just pluck which returns an array ...


7

That would do it: a.inject({}) {|sum, hash| sum.merge(hash) {|_, old, new| old + new }}


7

Because the characters are overlapped, you need to use a lookahead to capture the overlapped characters. (?=([a-z][a-z])) DEMO


7

Using Enumerable#inject (or Enumerable#reduce): h = {"foo" => {"bar" => {"hello" => {"world" => "result" } } } } keys_arr = ["foo", "bar", "hello", "world"] keys_arr.inject(h) { |x, k| x[k] } # => "result" UPDATE If you want to do something like: h["foo"]["bar"]["hello"]["world"] = "ruby" innermost = keys_arr[0...-1].inject(h) { |x, k| ...


7

The difference is that first example defines module method called preview, and second example defines mixin method preview. So that if you include first module into a class, you'll be able to call this method on the class (whereas calling the method on the class instance would cause the error), while including the second module into the class will allow you ...


7

You should be able to do that by overriding view_assigns in your controller: class SomeController < ApplicationController protected def view_assigns {} #an empty hash end end


6

I would go with nronas' answer, however people tend to forget about Regexp.union: str = "don't use bad words like" str.gsub(Regexp.union('bad', 'words', 'like'), '') # or str.gsub(Regexp.union(['bad', 'words', 'like']), '')


6

The last parameter of a method may be preceded by an asterisk(*), which is sometimes called the 'splat' operator. This indicates that more parameters may be passed to the function. Those parameters are collected up and an array is created. Example: def sample (*test) puts test end And call it with: sample(1,2,3) Will return array: [1,2,3] ...


6

No, it is not right. Imagine that you have a four-element list, [A,B,C,D]. Observe that: There are 4! = 24 possible permutations. For this to be a correct shuffling algorithm, each of these permutations needs to be equally likely. You are generating 4×2 = 8 random integers, each in the range 0–3, for a total of 48 = 65,536 possible sequences ...


6

Enumerable's implementation of map does use each, but there's nothing stopping an extending class from overriding it with its own implementation that does not use each. In this case Array does provide its own implementation of map for efficiency reasons.


6

Short version Ruby does call to_s, but it checks that to_s returns a string. If it doesn't, ruby calls the default implementation of to_s instead. Calling to_s recursively wouldn't be a good idea (no guarantee of termination) - you could crash the VM and ruby code shouldn't be able to crash the whole VM. You get different output from Fake.new.to_s because ...


6

From your GC logs it appears the issues is not a ruby object reference leak (the heap_live_slot is not increasing significantly) so that would suggest it's one of : Data being stored outside the heap (Strings, Arrays etc) A leak in a gem that uses native code A leak in the Ruby interpreter itself (least likely) It's interesting that it exhibits on both ...


6

#tap method simply passes an object it was called on to a block. At the end of the block it returns the same object again. This way you can chain operations or restrict variable scope. {}.tap { |h| h[:a] = 1 }.size # => 1 You were able to chain a next method to this block. And also avoided creating a h variable in your scope.


6

What @Neil Slater said, with a little more detail… There are basically two plausible approaches to storing an array of heterogeneous objects of differing sizes: Store the objects as a singly- or doubly-linked list, with the storage space for each individual object preceded by pointer(s) to the preceding and/or following objects. This structure has the ...


6

The problem is that you're currently calling ceil on 30.to_f. Here's how Ruby evaluates it: (67)/(30.to_f.ceil) # .ceil turns the float into an integer again (67)/(30.0.ceil) # and now it's just an integer division, which will be 2 67/30 # = 2 To solve this, you can just add parenthesis: puts (67/30.to_f).ceil # = 3



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