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0

I would suggest you to use Rails ActiveSupport::Inflector#parameterize solution - http://apidock.com/rails/ActiveSupport/Inflector/parameterize It handles a lot of edge cases and should work well for you.


0

Have a look at the gem String Urlize, it may help you write a script to do this.


0

sheet.rows.insert [index], sheet.rows.delete(sheet.rows.last) #index is the row that you want to insert ont


1

attr_accessible is depricated in rails 4. please use user_params instead of attr_accessible. In User.rb # no attr_accessible In users_controller.rb def create @user = User.new user_params @user.save end at the end private def user_params params.require(:user).permit(:email, :password, :password_confirmation) end Hope this will ...


-1

def score(dice) score = 0 dice.uniq.each do |number| count = dice.count number weight = if number == 1 then 10 else number end if count >= 3 score += weight * 100 count -= 3 end if count > 0 and number == 1 or number == 5 score += count * weight * 10 end end ...


0

#config/routes.rb scope module: "event" do get "check_in/:event_date_id", to: "event#check_in", as: :check_in end This should allow you to call: <%= link_to "Event", event_check_in_path(event_date.id) %>


0

Heroku If you're loading your database on Heroku again, you'll probably be best using the rake db:schema:load task - this builds the database from your schema, instead of your migrations. #db/schema.rb # If you need to create the application database on another # system, you should be using db:schema:load, not running all the migrations # from scratch ...


1

You can solve your example using regular Arrays of Date objects. Assuming you only use days I believe this will work pretty well in the cases you are interested in. That is: require 'date' a = [* Date.new(2014,1,1) .. Date.new(2014,1,15)] b = [* Date.new(2014,1,5) .. Date.new(2014,1,10)] diff = a - b diff.each { |date| puts date.strftime('%d %B %Y') } # ...


0

So finally, speaking with PP the credit card option hast to be enabled checking an option on your PP account settings. Even do this option is only for 'elegible buyers'.


1

You can't prevent this error as there are load reasons(like you mentioned missing cache, unknown request format and etc) You can try to restrict the number of predefined formats like: get '/about-us' => 'controller#about', :format => /(?:|html|json)/ Also you can suppress this exception. Create a new file(for example exception_handler.rb) in the ...


0

Sometimes you may want to avoid breaking the Law of Demeter as well. attr_writer would be better in that case than attr_accessor.


1

I'm not quite sure on the specific error, though most likely you'll have to re-install Ruby after update to Yosemite before installing cocoa pods. It seems like after update the Ruby configuration is broken. Additionally you may use Homebrew - to manage Ruby versions and installations (it is basically not only for Ruby).


0

h = {"abcd"=>{}, "hgfe"=>34567} f, l = h.partition { |_,v| v =={} }.flatten(1) { f.first=> { l.first => l.last } } #=> {"abcd"=>{"hgfe"=>34567}}


2

Do as below hash = {"abcd"=>{}, "hgfe"=>34567} hash['abcd']['hgfe'] = hash.delete('hgfe') hash # => {"abcd"=>{"hgfe"=>34567}} You can write something like below : def delete_key_and_add_to_another_key(hash, update_key, del_key) hash[update_key][del_key] = hash.delete(del_key) hash end hash = {"abcd"=>{}, "hgfe"=>34567} ...


0

Here's another way using the Regexp match method in Ruby. a.select { |letter| /[A-Z]!/.match(letter) } Also, one note: consider a more meaningful and contextually relevant variable name than "i" in a.select! {|i| i.upcase + "!"}. For example, I chose the name "letter", although there may be a more meaningful name. It's just a good naming practice that ...


0

Have you added the following in config/application.rb (within class Application < Rails::Application) ? config.assets.paths << "#{Rails}/vendor/assets/fonts" Check this blog post.


0

You could do it without Array#rotate. Suppose that for: a = [1, 2, 3, 4] the starting index were 2: enum = a.cycle 2.times { enum.next } enum.each { |i| p i; sleep 1 }


0

Up in the first line, you need to change params[:article] to article_params. Rails 4+ refuses to initialize an Active Model object unless the attributes passed to it have been explicitly whitelisted. This is a Rails security feature known as strong parameters that was introduced to better protect against mass assignment — "a computer vulnerability where an ...


0

You could use Hash#merge! method to merge unique key value pairs based on condition. parameters= { 'SearchIndex' => params[:searchIndex], 'Keywords' => params[:search_term] } case params[:searchindex] when 'All' parameters.merge!({ :'ResponseGroup' => 'ItemAttributes' }) else parameters.merge!({ :'ResponseGroup' => ...


0

To generate the route you want, send your event_date_id as a formal parameter instead: event_checkin_path(event_date.id) => event/checkin/7 Path helpers take an optional hash of additional named parameters, but, as you noticed, these are added to the generated URL as query parameters: event_checkin_path(event_date.id, other_param: "foo") => ...


5

puts a.grep(/[A-Z]!/) will do.


1

Try the following: a.select {|i| i =~ /[A-Z]!/}


2

rotate is the correct answer, but the reason your code wasn't working was because you were trying to concatenate the last part of the array and a.cycle, which is an Enumerator and probably not what you wanted. Furthermore, your code would output [3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4] (if you fixed the other part) because you don't slice off the end when you concatenate the rest ...


2

You could use rotate: a.rotate(new_index).cycle { ... } (NOTE: I don't think you need the .each)


0

There is a way to generate a transparent gradient image from within RMagick by using the Gradient Built-in Format and Image.read(): require 'RMagick' img = Magick::Image.read("gradient:rgba(0,0,0,0.3)-rgba(0,0,0,0.7)") do self.size = "100x100" end img.first.write("out.png") This is the same as running the following in the command line: $ convert ...


0

I believe it's good practice to explicitly do one thing with one method. So, do use both log_in_with(user, password) and login_successful? but do NOT call the former from the latter. Showing both calls in the test itself allows me to easily follow a test's logic and decipher any failure messages, whereas a single login_successful? call is confusing and ...


1

I've rarely seen someone use STDOUT.flush except in mutli-threading. Also it makes things confusing, defeating the whole purpose of writing elegant code.


2

This error is happening because you are copying the existing image to a new image instance which has no id. Naturally the database will throw a primary key exception. Why are you doing it this way? Why don't you update the existing image? If you must, you can delete the old image before saving the new one. @image = Image.new(image_params) @image.id = ...


0

This depends on the gem and may include additions to controllers and/or models and/or views. The use of the "will_paginate" gem includes adding adding <%= will_paginate @current_model %> to the view you wish to paginate. Suggest you view you ivew some tutorails from http://railscasts.com/. Try typing will paginate in search field


0

First do gem install bundler which will install a gem called bundler in your system which is very handy to use for our purpose. For Rails Project : I will tell whatever approach i am aware of. You install gems for your particular rails project using Gemfile like example put your gem details inside the Gemfile like below gem 'pg' # gem for postgres gem ...


1

You could try using .methods or .instance_methods to get the list of all accessible methods (for class and instance respectively): your_object.methods your_object.instance_methods


0

[Edit: I've only allowed the special characters in certain locations, but on re-reading, I think you want to permit them anywhere. It's an easy fix, but I can't do it right now. Will fix it this evening. @Amadan: good point.] If I understand your question correctly, I think this should work for you: def split_it(text, num_words, special_chars) ...


0

There are several ways to do this. I assume you're new to rails, so lets keep things simple: 1 - Add 3 image ids to your user migration / database: add_column :users, :image_1_id, :integer add_column :users, :image_2_id, :integer add_column :users, :image_3_id, :integer 2 - Make sure your user has the 3 images relations class User belongs_to :image_1, ...


1

Try to set the RAILS_ENV environment variable before running resque-web, e.g. $ RAILS_ENV=test resque-web


0

In the form_for you can do something like: <p> <%= f.radio_button_tag(:index, "1") %> <%= f.label_tag(:index_1, "1") %> <%= f.radio_button_tag(:index, "2") %> <%= f.label_tag(:index_2, "2") %> <%= f.radio_button_tag(:index, "3") %> <%= f.label_tag(:index_3, "3") %> </p>


0

You can change the name attribute of the radio buttons to be like this image[index]. A better way (IMO) is to use instance variables to store such value, as it will allow you to write code like f.radio_button :index. For example class Image < ActiveRecord::Base attr_accessor :index # Uncomment if you're using Rails < 4, otherwise whitelist ...


0

In regex every set of brackets creates a capture group, and for each match found in your input Ruby returns a list of these groups. You have two sets of brackets: the first around the whole expression and a second around each word (note that for repeating capture groups (e.g. (foo){x} ) only the last instance is returned). Hence a two item list for each ...


1

I came across this issue just now when installing Rails on my MacBook. I opened the /usr/bin/ directory and opened the "rails" file in a text editor. Here's the result. #!/usr/bin/ruby # Stub rails command to load rails from Gems or print an error if not installed. require 'rubygems' version = ">= 0" if ARGV.first =~ /^_(.*)_$/ and ...


0

Thanks for the tips, I found a solution: Put this on your development.rb file: config.middleware.delete Rack::Lock You also has to change Webrick. It worked ok with Puma.


0

Your read method is fine. The problem is that the XML document is not what you think it is. If you look at output of your create method, it creates only this document: <?xml version="1.0"?> <item> <data>9</data> <port>3</port> <length>max</length> <date>date</date> ...


1

Here is another way to do it: res = Hash.new { |h, k| h[k] = {} } hash.each do |kstring, datehash| datehash.each { |kdate, n| n == 0 ? res[kdate] : res[kdate][kstring] = n } end


0

you can create an array of xpaths, and run this code for each of them: [ ".//*[@id='sub_nav_content']/table/tbody/tr[3]/td[3]/a", ".//*[@id='sub_nav_content']/table/tbody/tr[2]/td[3]/a" ].each do |path| begin browser.find_element(:xpath => path).click // etc.... end while bl.any? end I believe that more changes need to ...


1

I believe this does what you want. h = {"string1" => {"date1" => 1, "date2" => 21, "date3" => 9}, "string2" => {"date1" => 23, "date2" => 88, "date3" => 2}, "string3" => {"date1" => 0, "date2" => 0, "date3" => 5}} h.each_with_object({}) { |(k,v),g| v.each { |d,vv| (g[d] ||= {}).update({ k=>vv }) } } ...


0

There seems to be something off with your routes. If you have an event resource, you should map your route as such /event/5/check_in, so you would have something looking like this in routes: resources :event do patch :check_in, on: :member end This should give you a check_in_event_path. You can then just pass the event to the path: ...


2

It looks like when you're sending a tag (params[:tag]) it is fetching posts with @posts = Post.tagged_with(params[:tag]) which is lacking the will paginate call. I believe you could get it working by adding the will paginate scope, like this: @posts = Post.tagged_with(params[:tag]).paginate(...)


0

On Ubuntu, run sudo apt-get install libmysqlclient-dev Or, if you use MariaDB, run sudo apt-get install libmariadbclient-dev


1

You are looking for strftime, not strptime. <%= @date_variable.strftime('%d-%m-%Y %H:%M') Note the %i you have doesn't seem to match up, check the docs to make sure you have the right format string.


1

Looking at some Github code I can see that STDOUT.flush is used mostly for server-side/multi-threaded jobs, and not in everyday use. Generally speaking, when you want to accept input from the user, you'd want to use gets.chomp. Just remember, no matter what the user enters, Ruby will ALWAYS interpreter that as a string. To convert it to an integer, you need ...


1

This is my solution: <%= call.datetime.strftime('%m/%d/%Y') %>


0

I solved my own problem here is what I did - tags = item.tag_list.map { |t| link_to t,tag_path(t) }.join(', ').html_safe <td>Tags: #{tags}</td> Got it working now like it supposed to.



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