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Try running bundle install in your command line. If that isn't it, please check back in with the results from your command line and we can try to troubleshoot the problem from there. Good luck.


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I think you're using the select method incorrectly at: elsif User.select(:cedula).exists? redirect './signup', :error => "La cédula #{params[:cedula]} ya se encuentra en uso. Intente nuevamente." According to the docs that returns a relation object, so if there are any users at all then #exists? will return true: ...


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Have you bundled from the command prompt? bundle intall Is this the error you get when running server? What appears on your localhost:3000?


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You can use -1 to specify the end of your range - this would point to the last character of a string, no matter the length: a = "This is a string" a[2..-1] #=> "is is a string" This same approach can be applied to get the second to last character -2, third to last character -3, etc. Hope it helps!


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Right, so from what I am seeing you are, as you understand yourself, not passing any options to the parser. When not indicating row_sep or any other form of option, smarter_csv will use the system new line separator which is "\r\n" for windows machines, and "\r" for unix machines. That being said, try the following... require 'smarter_csv' ...


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In my opinion, you have three possible roads you could go: 1) work with the "bad" input and try to find a workaround You could try and work line by line and try line.split (" ,") which would assume that there is a blank space before the comma. Another approach would be to identify the numerical values via regex and replacing the comma character (this ...


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I've found a dirty method that works. <% page_articles.each_with_index do |article, i| %> <li class="article_summary" id="test_<%=i %>"> <h1><%= link_to article.title, article %></h1> <style> <% if article.data.bg_color? %> #test_<%=i%> a{ color: ...


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The code is converting array of strings (json string), not array of hashes. Instead of using Person#to_json in Directory#to_json, use Person#to_hash like following: class Person def to_hash { last_name: @last_name, first_name: @first_name, gender: @gender, favorite_color: @favorite_color, date_of_birth: @date_of_birth ...


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You are getting the error because you are most likely getting a 401 response from the server which is causing the status code validation to fail. I would suggest printing out the response that you are receiving. Most likely that will show the authentication issue with a 401 status code. What would be helpful here is for you to use the debugPrintln(request) ...


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Try running... heroku run bundle exec rake assets:precompile heroku open In production, you must run rake assets:precompile to serve up anything in your app/assets folder. In development mode, Rails constantly checks for updates to the files and serves them each one separately. It is nice when you're developing, but is quite slow in production. So, to ...


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max's comment is exactly right, but to help put it into context, let me illustrate how, in your situation, you can build and apply a service object. First, consider what your service object will be doing, and pick a name for it (you'll often change this later, as you figure things out better). For example, TweetFetcher. Then, decide what information it ...


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I'd do it like this: text = 'Foo. (1983). Bar baz foo bar.' text.downcase # => "foo. (1983). bar baz foo bar." downcase folds the text to lower-case to make it easy to find matches for the words regardless of case. text.downcase.gsub(/[^a-z ]+/i, '') # => "foo bar baz foo bar" gsub(/[^a-z ]+/i, '') removes characters that aren't part of words, ...


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One of issues was that you were manually installing Nokogiri 1.6.6.2, but not including the nokogiri gem entry in your Gemfile. Bundler will specifically only show your app the gems that are listed in the file. It wasn't clear to me if you were tied to nokogiri 1.6.1 because it was a dependency of another gem. If there was another gem calling for 1.6.1 ...


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If are trying to handle multiple DOMs, you cannot use the DOM ID. So you'll need to replace the id by class. Working with multiple tbodys and sorting TRs inside each tbody: http://jsfiddle.net/aron_aron/1jjhdtj2/2/ Also, if you bind <table id="habits", the sortable content will be the entire tbody html content. Update Let me try to do a simple ...


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You can use .strftime( ) method, like this: @date_of_birth.strftime('%m/%d/%Y')


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Find wicked_pdf.rb in path/to/gem/wkhtmltopdf/bin, on line 64 replace file:// with file:/// (you can read why at https://github.com/mileszs/wicked_pdf/issues/157). If it still didn't work out rename the file download_pdf.pdf.erb to download.erb. It works fine for me :)


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Find wicked_pdf.rb in path/to/gem/wkhtmltopdf/bin, on line 64 replace file:// with file:///.


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bundle install You forgot to bundle.


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I assume that if the string looks like: <mailto:....> the dots represent one or more email addresses, and if more than one, they are separated by "|". Further, I assume that part of the string need not be checked to confirm it contains valid email addresses, properly separated. In those assumptions are correct, you don't need a regex to extract the ...


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You are missing the initialization of the Parse.client. This is an example from the gem's official documentation. require 'parse-ruby-client' client = Parse.create :application_id => '<your_app_id>', :api_key => '<your_api_key>', :quiet => true | false To use the client ...


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You are using a form_for, so that f is a form builder. This means that it is bound to the object you initialized it with, let's call it @habit. Since you're calling collection_check_boxes on the form builder, it will do something like @habit.send(:commit) to consult whether or not it should have the check box checked, and currently (apparently) it is not. In ...


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Use the Nokogiri Gem to parse the xml then output it as a ruby hash. Here is another stackoverflow answer that gives an example if the docs are not enough. You could also use the Ruby Hash delete_if and has_key? methods to remove or allow whatever you want.


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Semicolon: yes. irb(main):018:0> x = 1; c = 0 => 0 irb(main):019:0> x => 1 irb(main):020:0> c => 0 You can even run multiple commands separated by semicolons in a one-liner loop irb(main):021:0> (c += x; x += 1) while x < 10 => nil irb(main):022:0> x => 10 irb(main):023:0> c => 45


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We run a kind of legacy database with rails at work. Some of the stuff was added through SQL, other things were added via migrations etc. Basically, the answer to your question is yes, and you can even run migrations etc for subsequent database maintenance. But to get started, you just need to tell rails where to look for the table when given a model. From ...


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@organization.relationships doesn't contain users instances it's contain relation instances between user and organization(I assume you use HABTM).You can use where to find user id in relationships. => @organization.relationships.where(user_id: @user.id).any? #> true #> short version should work too. => @organization.relationships.where(user: ...


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You can debug Ruby script by using debug library. If the script is executed from shell, this can be achieved by changing first line of the script into: #!/usr/bin/env ruby -rdebug or running it as: ruby -rdebug my_script.rb Once the debugger is loaded, you can either set-up some breakpoints or just run the app by typing c to continue the execution. ...


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This line below will return you the relatioships for particular organization. @organization.relationships Now what you are currently doing is trying to see if user exists in the active record relation list of relationships which you will always get false. if you want to see the user present for the relationships associated to organization. you should ...


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You need to compare @user to User objects not Relationship objects @organization.relationships.map(&:user).include?(@user)


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You tagged the question with the heroku tag. Heroku will take care of this for you. Locally, you should first create a new user: sudo -u postgres createuser -s your_user_name For local development you can make this a super-user. Heroku will use sensible defaults in production. Done that, configure your rails app and then create your db: bin/rake ...


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The validates instruction checks if the attribute is present at creation time (and it isn't as you don't specify it in the parameters of create). Removing validates :admin, presence: true leads to applying the default value (false) when admin is not specified.


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http://rubular.com is a great resource. \b[a-z]\b says any single character between two word boundaries. If you would like to allow for multiple characters use this: \b[a-z]+\b That says any one or more letters between two word boundaries.


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First and foremost, your API keys are secret and should not be stored in your code base. Assuming that the module loads the keys securely, I'd recommend you store the module in the lib/modules directory. You can then load it in an initializer in the config/initializers directory. Rails executes initializers in alphabetical order before loading models and ...


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define a to_csv method in your model as shown below class Car < ActiveRecord::Base def self.to_csv attributes = %w{id name price} #customize columns here CSV.generate(headers: true) do |csv| csv << attributes all.each do |car| csv << attributes.map{ |attr| car.send(attr) } end end end end Later in ...


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You may try to use GDB wrapper for Ruby (GitHub). Install on Linux via: sudo apt-get install gdb python-dev ncurses-dev ruby-rvm gem install gdb.rb Basic usage: require 'gdb' # create a new GDB::Ruby instance and attach it to # pid 12345 gdb = GDB::Ruby.new(12345) # print the (ruby) backtrace of the remote process gdb.backtrace.each { |line| puts line ...


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I don't think rack-cors would create a initializer. If you followed the README on Github, you have to do it yourself. Put this snippet of code into your application.rb file. module YourApp class Application < Rails::Application # ... config.middleware.insert_before 0, "Rack::Cors" do allow do origins '*' resource '*', ...


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The problem is that from the main thread you can't know when Thread.new code block has actually been executed. By using sleep, you just give it enough time so it is executed. In such cases, I prefer to use a Queue, where the Thread.new block does a push (usually a nil) into it after it has finished doing what it's supposed to do, while the thread that used ...


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Depending on how you have your code currently structured, you want to read the csv file into memory and then convert it to json and pass the string to your export_json_to_computer file, as below: def convert_csv_to_json(csv_file_name) rows = JSON.pretty_generate(CSV.read(csv_file_name).to_a) test = FileExportManager.new ...


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Add a route that points refresh to token controller action using match


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To easily debug Ruby shell script, just change its first line from: #!/usr/bin/env ruby to: #!/usr/bin/env ruby -rdebug Then every time when debugger console is shown, you can choose: c for Continue (to the next Exception, breakpoint or line with: debugger), n for Next line, w/where to Display frame/call stack, l to Show the current code, cat to show ...


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You're going to need to override the view templates. Try running bundle show spree or bundle open spree if you have an editor setup for bundle, this way you'll know which file you need to change. Its likely going to be somewhere here or in one of the partials, look around. Then you can override it with deface, see Spree Docs here If you want override ...


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For the first problem, you want to configure the posts_controller to accept the nested attributes for comments. Add this line at the beginning of your controller: accepts_nested_attributes_for :comments Check the documentation for further details on this method. Then, you need to modify the parameters that the controller will allow: def create_params ...


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You're correct that it iterates through the array, checking values and swapping if needed - if a swap has been made at all in that process it considers the array to be unsorted and sets sorted = false. If that is the case, the until loop will ensure an entire new pass happens across the array, to redo the process again. The only time the until loop stops is ...


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get '/route' do content_type 'image/gif' Base64.decode64("R0lGODlhAQABAPAAAAAAAAAAACH5BAEAAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAICRAEAOw==") end If you want to set the disposition, you can do it like this (for example): headers 'Content-Disposition' => 'inline;filename="tracking.gif"'


3

You can enumerate through the association collection, and use a method like reduce to calculate the sum: class Order < ActiveRecord::Base has_many :line_products def total_price @total_price ||= line_products.includes(:product).reduce(0) do |sum, l_prod| sum + (l_prod.count * l_prod.product.price) end end end Just remember to: ...


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Create sum method for LineProduct def sum product.price * count # I believe you have count/price validations in place end order.line_products.map(&:sum).inject(:+) inject(:+) is for summing up


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The .times loop does a single pass over the array, comparing each element with its neighbor and swapping them if they're in the wrong order. The outer until sorted loop repeats this process until nothing changes anymore. At this point the array is sorted. The sorted variable records whether we swapped any elements during our last pass over the array. If we ...


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Fixed code: def has_one_document(association_name, options={}) class_eval <<-EOS def #{ association_name } MongoidContainer.const_get(#{association_name.to_s.classify.inspect}) .where(#{ name.underscore }_id: id).first end EOS end Note the added .inspect on line 4. classify returns a string, so your middle line would ...


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So what's the issue ? Does migration complete ? If you mind just for the warning about DL being deprecated, downgrading to already unsupported Ruby version sounds ridiculous. This may be just quite unharmful notice for developers to start using newer C-extension interface, while functionality is kept unaffected.


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You didn't specify what the other format would be, but you could use a regex to identify strings in the given format and verify that both sides of the | are indeed the same address. The code would be something like: def get_mail(str) matches = /<mailto:([\w\-\.]+@[\w\-\.]+)\|([\w\-\.]+@[\w\-\.]+)>/.match(str) if (matches.nil? || matches[0] != ...


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If you find an error in gem, you'd better make pull request on GitHub. But let's suppose you need your private fork of gem. Best workflow for that: Download the gem source code from GitHub: git clone https://github.com/author/awesome_gem.git. In your project's Gemfile add gem awesome_gem, path: "/local/path/to/awesome_gem" Run bundle install Now you can ...



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