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1

map works on any object that includes the Enumerable mixin. In order to work with Enumerable, the class needs to provide each - that's the foundation all the other nice methods are built on. Objects of the CSV class fit this pattern, as you can see in the documentation for the class. (The reason it doesn't push it straight into an array is because it's ...


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I believe your strategy is very problematic - creating attributes to a class from user input doesn't sound like a very good idea. Furthermore, adding methods (like attr_reader) to every instances can have severe performance issues. If all you want is a data structure to hold your data, keep using a Hash. If you want a structure you can query using a dot ...


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So, you can do something like that: AWS::S3::Base.establish_connection!( :access_key_id => 'my access key', :secret_access_key => 'my secret key' ) ENV['BUCKET']='mybucket' So, now you can replace BUCKET with ENV['BUCKET'] in your controller.


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The question here: Is auto-initialization of multi-dimensional hash array possible in Ruby, as it is in PHP? provides a very useful AutoHash implementation that does this.


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It depends on why you want to that: class Grampa def a puts "Gramps" end end class Papa < Grampa def a puts "Papa" end end p = Papa.new p.instance_eval 'undef :a' p.a #=> NoMethodError: undefined method `a' for #<Papa:0x0000010114abe8> q = Papa.new q.instance_eval { self.class.send(:remove_method, :a) } q.a #=> Gramps r = ...


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I got it working! I added a... skip_before_action :verify_authenticity_token to the controller. The issue was found when checking out the logs and seeing that the CSRF token could not be verified.


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I guess you are using Rails 4. If so, the needed parameters must be marked as required in controller. You can refer http://stackoverflow.com/questions/17868427/rails-4-activemodelforbiddenattributeserror


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You can just use a hash of matchers as keys, and results as values, as follows: ma = [ :cat, :dog ] input = [ "We have a dog", "Cat running around!", "All dOgS bark", "Nothing to see here", nil ] input.map {|s| ma.reduce(:none) {|result,m| s.to_s =~ /#{m}/i && m || result } } # => [:dog, :cat, :dog, :none, :none]


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I am not sure how Watir works here. But if you find an element click on it it navigates you to a different page and the DOM refreshes. You therefore going back with driver.navigate().back(); and try to use same about element to perform your action which is not valid anymore. The DOM refreshed means the reference to the element is lost and that's not a valid ...


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Bundler is a great package manager and is definitely the ruby standard. It is comparable to pip and npm. You can set it up like so: Install Bundler: $ gem install bundler Specify your dependencies in a Gemfile in your project's root: source 'https://rubygems.org' gem 'nokogiri' gem 'rack', '~>1.1' gem 'rspec', :require => 'spec' Then, on any ...


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I wrote a tutorial on exactly this topic. Please see: www.danielcsite.com/rspec_custom_matchers In the tutorial I show in detail and with screenshots how to both write a custom matcher class and call it by way of chaining several methods.


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I think the best practice in this case would be placing the methods code in your resource's helper file and then call the helper from your view or partial, even if the logic isn't much you shouldn't place it in your view file. so if your resource name is "events", it would be something like this: #app/helpers/events_helper.rb def method_name # code goes ...


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You could do this with CSS and javascript. You could have a class background-color-blue with background-color: blue for example on your body or custom element. Then, when submit is clicked, you simply change the class to background-color-red. document.getElementById("MyElement").className = "background-color-red"; I would do some research using ...


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I think this might be what you're looking for. I've assumed @tranfee is to be set equal to the first value in the hash whose key begins with "tran" and that @rate is to be set equal to the first value in the hash whose key begins with "rate". If that interpretation is not correct, please let me know. Note that I've put initialize in the PaymentType module ...


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You can try this to set the browser if you believe the title is throwing it off: browser.window(:index => 1).use Otherwise, I would suggest the following: modal = browser.modal_dialog modal.button(:id => 'close').click or modal.link(:text => 'close').click Once you set the modal to modal you can call any methods you would normally call on a ...


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You can extract logic away into view helpers. While not recommended as best practice, you can even create methods that return Strings or even Strings that have been escaped for html to display in your view. I think a partial would be fine for that content, but if you really want to store it somewhere other than a partial, then define a helper method in ...


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Syntastic is loading the wrong version of Ruby. From your command line, enter ruby -v && which ruby. Noe, change the second line of the settings to: let g:syntastic_ruby_rubocop_exec = '/Users/jjasonclark/.rbenv/shims/ruby /Users/jjasonclark/.rbenv/shims/rubocop' Using whatever path which shows you.


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I realize this is an old question, but Google sent me here last week so it's not an obsolete question. The answer I found elsewhere was the "stub" directive for sprockets. So something like //= require-tree . //= stub Modernizr This keeps Modernizr.js out of the bundled assets. It can be included with its own tag, à la the original answer. The ...


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HA! figured it out! the line in question needs to be: options.each { |o,p| opts.on(*o, &p) }


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And yet another way (= def factorial(number) number = number.to_i number_range = (number).downto(1).to_a factorial = number_range.inject(:*) puts "The factorial of #{number} is #{factorial}" end factorial(#number)


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Rspreadsheet for Open Document spreadsheets. It can read, modify and write osd files.


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After each method you could use the puts method to see the state of the techdocument variable: testdocument.gsub!(/[\n\r]/," ") puts testdocument testdocument.squeeze!(" ") puts testdocument


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You can use DateTime.strptime and specify the format as the second parameter pu = DateTime.strptime("11/23/2014 8:35 PM", "%m/%d/%Y %l:%M %p") @appointment = @car.appointments.build(pickuptime: pu)


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If you really need reject nil only, so it can be done like this: scores.reject(&:nil?)


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It's like writing some code if (consume_value || consume_expression), it's going to succeed to consume the value, and never try to consume the expression. Parslet will try to match your options in the order they are defined. If it can consume some of the input stream without any conflict, it's considered a successful match. As it succeeded matching value it ...


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You are not passing a block to the it method (you missing both do and end at the end). it "has attack action" ^^^ The correct code should look like this: describe Hero do let(:dicepool) {double("dicepool")} describe "def attributes" do let(:hero){Hero.new dicepool: dicepool} it "has default strength equal to 3" do ...


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The most elegant solution I've seen on finding word count in Ruby was: words = 'This is a word' p words.scan(/\S+/).size #=> 4 For most convenience, monkey patch String: class String def number_of_words self.scan(/\S+/).size end end p 'Hi there, how are you?'.number_of_words #=> 5 The main problem I see with your code is that you're ...


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You have a typo in your last test, you forgot the word do: it "has attack action" do expect(hero.actions[:attack]).to eq(attack_action) end Everything passes once added.


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What version of ruby are you using? ruby -v It sounds like the Gemfile has a ruby requirement listed for 2.1.2. You may need to install that version: rbenv install 2.1.2 Then you may need to tell rbenv to use that version for that project: rbenv local 2.1.2 It looks like the rbenv team/community decided against adding support for ruby versions ...


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Well, Which programming language has the best package manager? | Continuous Updating as well as the two SO questions linked in my question all point to Bundler: The best way to manage a Ruby application's gems. I guess the workflow is gem install bundler, add gems to Gemfile, then bundle install.


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The subexpression rule should first try to match the bool_operation rule before moving to value. rule(:subexpression) {(bool_operation | value).repeat(1)} Also, you need to tag the values in bool_operation so that they don't get incorrectly merged. rule(:bool_operation) { value.as(:first) >> bool_comparison >> value.as(:second) }


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It does involve regular expressions but it's the most elegant solution: "Hi there 334".scan(/[[:alpha:]]+/).count # => 2


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Hm, s = "Never eat shredded wheat" puts s.split.count # => 4 If you don't want to count underscores and digits: s = "Never eat shredded wheat 1 _ ?" puts s.split.reject { |w| w =~ /(\W|_|\d)/ }.count # => 4 even more advanced regexp: s = "Never __ 111 ?? eat shredded wheat. _Word?" p s.split.reject { |w| w !~ /([a-zA-Z]+(_[a-zA-Z]+)*)/ } # => ...


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You can do it like this: f1.instance_eval('undef :a_method')


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I'm surprised that nobody went for the case/when approach, so here it is: def pets(house) house.map do |item| case item when /dog/i :dog when /cat/i :cat else :none end end end map isn't that complicated: you use it whenever you have an array of n elements that you want to turn into another array of n ...


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Here is a solution using the Array#map method. def pets (house) house.map do |animal| if animal.to_s.downcase.include?('cat') :cat elsif animal.to_s.downcase.include?('dog') :dog else :none end end end


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def pets (house) results = [] house.each do |str| if str.to_s.downcase.include?('dog') results << :dog elsif str.to_s.downcase.include?('cat') results << :cat else results << :none end end return results end This works. And here's the above code, written in pseudo-code (plain english, following a ...


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You have the right ideas. The best way is your Method 2. Create a business logic service object. This is a plain old Ruby object. It is not a controller, not a view, and not a typical Rails ActiveRecord model that uses a database table. (In my own Rails apps, I create a new directory app/services) Create a minimal API controller, and a minimal web ...


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Try adding the inverse relationships: #Plan has_many :teams, inverse_of: :plan #Team belongs_to :plan, inverse_of: teams The inverse relationships help ensure that save works when you save subobjects. Try looking at the id of each item before and after save: p "team_plan.id:#{team_plan.id}, team.plan.id: #{team.plan.id}" team.plan = team_plan p ...


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surely this is an appropriate use of a double being used in 2 examples. No, it's not. :) You're trying to use a class variable; do not do that because the variable doesn't span examples. The solution is to set the client each time i.e. in each example. Bad: @client ||= Strava::Api::V3::Client.new(access_token: 'abc123') Good: @client = ...


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require 'net/http' uri = URI('http://example.com/some_path?query=string') httpns = Net::HTTP def get(uri) httpns::Get.new uri end http.start(uri.host, uri.port) do |http| request = get uri response = http.request request # Net::HTTPResponse object end in your class.


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It looks like you are using indented syntax in your sass file. It also looks like your variable declaration is quite indented. I suspect that this indentation makes the variable scoped, which means that it is not available outside the scope. Try un-indenting the variable declaration: /* VARIABLES */ $pageGreen: #194719 /* <-- not indented at all */ ...


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Just be carful: this is NOT Unicode safe method: 'привет, мир!'.titleize "привет, мир!" In order to be Unicode safe please take a look on unicode gem. Unicode.capitalize('привет, мир!') "Привет, мир!" This gem correctly handles Unicode character, however it doesn't have titleize method, it has only capitalize method.


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Depending on your needs you may need to run: gpg2 --keyserver hkp://keys.gnupg.net --recv-keys D39DC0E3 Note gpg2, not gpg as mentioned in instruction. Here more details as found. This should be helpful. Make sure you run gpg command while logged in as the same OS user who makes rvm installation.


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If you store the datetime you can use it for that query using beginning_of_day and end_of_day methods on the time with timezone date = Time.parse('Wed, 19 Nov 2014 19:23:59 UTC +00:00') # => 2014-11-19 19:23:59 UTC d = date.in_time_zone('Paris') # => Wed, 19 Nov 2014 20:23:59 CET +01:00 User.where(created_at: ...


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Here is the solution: def create user = User.create(name: params[:user]) render :json => JSON.pretty_generate(user.as_json), :status => 200, content_type: 'application/json', location: url_for(user) # you did mistake here. end I hope this will help!


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You should put the include tag for "play" after the include tag for jquery: <%= stylesheet_link_tag "Main.css" %> <%= stylesheet_link_tag "play.css" %> <%= javascript_include_tag "jquery-2.1.1.min" %> <%= javascript_include_tag :application %> <%= javascript_include_tag "play" %>


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foobar = ["ABC: OPEN", "123: OPEN", "FOO: CLOSED", "BAR: CLOSED", "XYZ: OPEN", "LMO: CLOSED"] foo_hash = Hash.new foobar.each { |str| k,v = str.split(': '); foo_hash[k] = v.to_sym } foo_hash gives you => {"ABC"=>:OPEN, "123"=>:OPEN, "FOO"=>:CLOSED, "BAR"=>:CLOSED, "XYZ"=>:OPEN, "LMO"=>:CLOSED}


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One more way :- arr = [ "ABC: OPEN", "123: OPEN", "FOO: CLOSED", "BAR: CLOSED", "XYZ: OPEN", "LMO: CLOSED" ] arr.each_with_object({}) do |string, hash| key, val = string.scan(/\w+/) hash[key] = val.to_sym end # => {"ABC"=>:OPEN, # "123"=>:OPEN, # "FOO"=>:CLOSED, # "BAR"=>:CLOSED, # "XYZ"=>:OPEN, # ...


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This might work : foobar_hash = {} foobar.each { |s| foobar_hash[s.split(":")[0].strip] = s.split(":")[1].strip.to_sym }



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