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13

Here's one way I like to accomplish this: >> index = zeros(1,sum(rep)); >> index(cumsum([1 rep(1:end-1)])) = 1; index = 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 >> index = cumsum(index) index = 1 1 2 2 2 3 4 4 4 4 4 >> vv = v(index) vv = 3 3 1 ...


9

Start by using Data.List.group. This gives you a list of runs of equal elements, e.g. > group "abbccccb" ["a","bb","cccc","b"] Then, map over this list, taking the head and length of each run. This can be done elegantly with the &&& operator from Control.Arrow: > map (length &&& head) . group $ "abbccccb" ...


8

There's no built-in function I know of, but here's one solution: index = zeros(1,sum(b)); index([1 cumsum(b(1:end-1))+1]) = 1; c = a(cumsum(index)); Explanation: A vector of zeroes is first created of the same length as the output array (i.e. the sum of all the replications in b). Ones are then placed in the first element and each subsequent element ...


6

Why don't you encode each $ in the original file as $$ in the compressed file? And/or use some other character instead of $ - one that is not used much in bmp files. Also note that the BMP format has RLE compression 'built-in' - look here, near the bottom of the page - under "Image Data and Compression". I don't know what you're using your program for, ...


6

public static String encode(String source) { StringBuffer dest = new StringBuffer(); for (int i = 0; i < source.length(); i++) { int runLength = 1; while (i + 1 < source.length() && source.charAt(i) == source.charAt(i + 1)) { runLength++; i++; } ...


6

Take only the last N values from r$values and r$lengths: foo <- function(x,N){ r <- rle(as.character(x)) lastN<-max(1,(length(r$lengths) - N + 1)):length(r$lengths) short <- paste0(r$values[lastN], collapse="_") long <- paste0(r$values[lastN], "(", r$lengths[lastN], ")", collapse="_") data.frame(short, long) } ddply(paths, ...


6

It seems like you are looking for run length decoding: that is idx(ii) represent the length A(ii) should be present in the encoded output. Here's a nice way of doing that in Matlab: output = zeros(1, sum(idx)); % allocate output output( cumsum( [1 idx(1:end-1)] ) ) = 1; output = A( cumsum( output ) ); output = 2 2 3 4 4 4 5


5

I believe that you are conflating RLE with Lempel/Ziv sliding window compression. RLE strictly works on repeated characters: WWWWWWWW => W8 LZ has a sliding window that will pick up patterns as you describe. David MacKay's site has example compression codes in Python, including LZ


5

In Java you can use a plain byte and convert to an int as required with b & 0xFF The problem you have is that Java does not support pointers and you cannot pass a pointer to bytes to Java. The nearest equivalent is byte[]. If you are only doing RLE encoding, the actual value of the bytes is not important so it doesn't matter whether they are signed or ...


5

I'll assume that your issue is with RLE in AC block coefficients encoding in JPEG. Variant of RLE, used in JPEG is quite specific. Each block of 8x8 pixels is transformed with DCT and quantised. Then DCT output (64 coefficients) is separated for first DC coefficient and 63 AC coefficients. 8x8 block of AC coefs is converted to linear array using Zig-Zag ...


5

You miss to check your run length count for char overflow, so this will go wrong if you have more than 255 identical characters in your file in sequence.


4

The two solutions I use when performance is the only concern: LZO Has a GPL License. liblzf Has a BSD License. miniLZO.tar.gz This is LZO, just repacked in to a 'minified' version that is better suited to embedded development. Both are extremely fast when decompressing. I've found that LZO will create slightly smaller compressed data than liblzf in most ...


4

It can be done in quadratic cubic quadratic time via dynamic programming. Here is some Python code: import sys import numpy as np bignum = 10000 S = sys.argv[1] #'AAABBAAABBCECE' N = len(S) # length of longest substring match bet ...


4

If you have a preset distribution of values that means the propability of each value is fixed over all datasets, you can create a huffman encoding with fixed codes (the code tree has not to be embedded into the data). Depending on the data, I'd try huffman with fixed codes or lz77 (see links of Brian).


4

You should break down this problem into smaller parts. First, you should have a function that tokenizes your stream and returns each individual part. For this example input stream: "XXXYYYYY(1ADEFC)(EDCADD)(1ADEFC)(1ADEFC)(1ADEFC)" this function will return the following elements, one per call: X X X Y Y Y Y Y (1ADEFC) (EDCADD) (1ADEFC) (1ADEFC) (1ADEFC) ...


3

Since you're coding bits, you probably want to use a bit-based RLE instead of a byte-based one. In this context, you should consider Elias gamma coding (or some variant thereof) to efficiently encode your run lengths. A reasonable first approximation for your encoding format might be: first bit = same as the first bit of the uncompressed string (to set ...


3

If you don't mind slightly different values due to rounding, I can compress that really well for you. from math import pi, sin interval=2*pi/1024 sinval=lambda i:int(round(sin(i*interval)*36))+50 Here is code to actually do what you want; it works with vals = sorted((sinval(i), i) for i in range(1024)) as test data. You would need to switch the order ...


3

The common solution for this is RLE - Run-length encoding, the Wikipedia article has sample implementation code.


3

Trivially solvable using the Python "batteries included": >>> data = "abbbccac" >>> from itertools import groupby >>> ilen = lambda gen : sum(1 for x in gen) >>> print [(ch, ilen(ich)) for ch,ich in groupby(data)] [('a', 1), ('b', 3), ('c', 2), ('a', 1), ('c', 1)] groupby returns an iterator of 2-tuples. The first is ...


3

This is an example of a longest repeated substring problem. It is classically solved with a suffix tree data structure. For short strings, you can use a form of a regex: import re s1='1010101001010101101010100101010110101010010101011010101001010101' i=2 l=s1 j=len(l)/2 while i<len(s1): m=re.search('^(.{'+str(j)+'})\\1$',l) if m: ...


2

Well, the main two algorithms that come to mind are Huffman and LZ. The first basically just creates a dictionary. If you restrict the dictionary's size sufficiently, it should be pretty fast...but don't expect very good compression. The latter works by adding back-references to repeating portions of output file. This probably would take very little ...


2

AAAAAABBCDEEEEGGHJ$IIIIIIIII ==> $A6$B2CD$E4$G2HJ$$I9 If the repeat character occurs in the data, try inserting an extra repeat character in the encoded data. Then if the decoder sees a double repeat character it can insert the actual repeat character $A6$B2CD$E4$G2HJ$$I9 ==> AAAAAABBCDEEEEGGHJ$IIIIIIIII


2

Since this seems to be audio, I'd look at either differential PCM or ADPCM, or something similar, which will reduce it to 4 bits/sample without much loss in quality. With the most basic differential PCM implementation, you just store a 4 bit signed difference between the current sample and an accumulator, and add that difference to the accumulator and move ...


2

I'm pretty sure this isn't the best approach, and depending on the length of the patterns, might have a running time and memory usage that won't work, but here's some code. You can paste the following code into LINQPad and run it, and it should produce the following output: ABCBCABCBCDEEF = (2A(2BC))D(2E)F ABBABBABBABA = (3A(2B))ABA ABCDABCDCDCDCD = ...


2

After closing, I belatedly found this solution "What's the most Pythonic way to identify consecutive duplicates in a list?". NB: with a periodic fn like sine, you can get by by only storing a quarter (i.e. 256 values) or half of the table, then perform a little (fixed-point) arithmetic on the index at lookup time. As I commented, if you further don't ...


2

To add to the list of possible solutions, consider this one: vv = cellfun(@(a,b)repmat(a,1,b), num2cell(v), num2cell(rep), 'UniformOutput',0); vv = [vv{:}]; This is much slower than the one by gnovice..


2

Simple if I understood it right ... from itertools import groupby data = "abbbccac" print [(k, len(list(g))) for k,g in groupby(data)] Wow - got very surprising results comparing Paul's very similar function to mine. It turns out the loading the list is 10-100 times faster. Even more surprising is the that the list implementation has bigger advantage as ...


2

Here is a more imperative form. You can eliminate your duplicate code by adding or chaining to a throwaway sentinel that will never match any of your list elements, forcing an end-of-sequence pass through your "this-not-equal-last" code: from itertools import chain def rle(seq): ret = [] sentinel = object() enum = ...


2

Hopefully this will get you started on your assignment: The fundamental idea behind run-length encoding is that consecutively occurring tokens like aaaa can be replaced by a shorter form 4a (meaning "the following four characters are an 'a'"). This type of encoding was used in the early days of computer graphics to save space when storing an image. Back ...


2

This looks like a job for itertools.groupby(): >>> from itertools import groupby >>> data =['1', '0', '9', '31', '11', '12', 'nan', '10', '44', '53', '12', '66', '99', '3', '2', '6.75833', 'nan', 'nan', 'nan', '3', '7', 'nan', 'nan'] >>> [len(list(group)) for key, group in groupby(data) if key == 'nan'] [1, ...



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