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10

Agile in an umbrella term for methods like XP, Scrum, Crystal, DSDM, FDD,... that share common principles. The Unified Process is a framework that can be used to describe a development process, RUP being one instantiation of UP based on Rational's tools. UP predates most Agile methods and may or may not be considered as Agile. What they have in common is ...


8

There is OpenUp, see Wikipedia overview reproduced hereafter. The Eclipse Foundation also issued OpenUp templates (MS Word .dot format, EPL V1.0 license). The Open Unified Process (OpenUP) is a part of the Eclipse Process Framework (EPF), an open source process framework developed within the Eclipse Foundation. It provides best practices from ...


5

RUP has 3 main parts: Roles Activities Work Products Each ROLE do an ACTIVITY and as a result a produce a WORK PRODUCTS... For example Analyst [Role] Develop Vision [Activity] as a result we will have Vision [Work Product]... Besides this RUP gives us some GUIDELINES and CHECKLIST to do right our ACTIVITY and WORK PRODUCTS... RUP gives us ...


3

You want to use Rational Unified Process in a one-person team? While I suppose it might be a hint about the sorts of things that you're going to have to do, it would seem to me to be an absurdly heavyweight thing to use formally. Like using a thermonuclear weapon to kill a mosquito, it will work but is still Doing It Wrong. For a single person team, ...


2

The Microsoft Solutions Framework. IBM has an article comparing MSF to RUP. And in the interest of equal time, there's this article on MSDN comparing MSF to RUP.


2

Agile is an approach to software development: (quoted from the Agile Alliance website) What Is Agile Software Development? In the late 1990’s several methodologies began to get increasing public attention. Each had a different combination of old ideas, new ideas, and transmuted old ideas. But they all emphasized close collaboration between the ...


2

Agile and RUP grew separately, RUP on the foundation of UML, and now IBM is trying to catch up the agile wave cause there is no [more] big buzz on RUP.


2

This is more theoritical, I can tell you this : There is a sequence to it, but our mind works parallely so, 1) Use case : The use case diagram identifies a proper case, it shows the steps to fulfill your requirement/needs. Proper steps 2) Sequence Diagram : In order to satisfy your requirements, there should be flow of data/action/information and ...


2

They are all part of AGILE software development. Thus, they share some common features like being iterative. But they cover different parts of SWDev. See this picture: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agile_software_development#Software_development_life_cycle SCRUM: Is a way of doing projects. It gives you a framework of habits to apply so you get your team to ...


2

Robustness Diagram here is the link: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/rsysarch/v11/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.sa.oomethod.doc%2Ftopics%2Fc_Ideal_Object_Diagram.html another link is here: http://www.agilemodeling.com/artifacts/robustnessDiagram.htm


2

If you define practical as "helps me get my work done," I don't find anything practical about RUP, prescriptive maybe not not particularly practical. If you are just interested in picking up a methodology and don't have to learn RUP, then I suggest any of many different books on Agile Methods. Highsmith's Agile Software Development Ecosystems is a good ...


1

Try the Rational Unified Process page at Wikipedia for an overview. The core requirements should be documented in the project description. RUP tends to place a lot of emphasis on "use cases", however it is very important not to lose sight of the original requirements at all levels of detail, because these will answer the "Why?" questions. If the developers ...


1

Please see this answer to understand what is an extended UC. UML, include, extend relationship Extension point is defined in the extended UC and specifies how/when exactly the extending UC can be invoked. As a UC is typically described by scenarios and scenarios have steps, you usually describe the extension point as steps in which the extension can occur. ...


1

They are both iterative models which seem similar, but both of them are vastly different. RUP is a framework for organizations and teams while Scrum is intended for a product team with stringent guidelines. I'd suggest you read these: SCRUM RUP


1

I think it might be reasonable if you cannot estabilish a team for trying out a process. But practically, you would certainly want to adjust it to remove artifacts, which are used for communication, which you will not need. You should also bear in mind, that it might be hard to act objectively especially in testing and all other review activities.


1

Basically, "Executable Architecture" is RUP's parlance for a description of the system's architecture that can be more or less directly converted into code and other low-level artefacts. This is in opposition to how architectures are sometimes specified, i.e. as informal descriptions or box-and-arrow diagrams that are fine as human communication mechanism, ...


1

The defence industry often uses some variant of MIL-STD-498 or its successor IEEE 12207. These are more technically oriented than RUP and less concerned with, well, selling consultants for Rational quite frankly.


1

Yea, you can use RUP in "one" man project...:-) Just look at it: Kruchten, "A Software Development Process for a Team of One" Read Online at : http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/content/RationalEdge/feb02/ProcessForOneFeb02.pdf



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