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299

You have to understand the forwarding problem. You can read the entire problem in detail, but I'll summarize. Basically, given the expression E(a, b, ... , c), we want the expression f(a, b, ... , c) to be equivalent. In C++03, this is impossible. There are many attempts, but they all fail in some regard. The simplest is to use an lvalue-reference: ...


243

First example std::vector<int> return_vector(void) { std::vector<int> tmp {1,2,3,4,5}; return tmp; } std::vector<int> &&rval_ref = return_vector(); The first example returns a temporary which is caught by rval_ref. That temporary will have its life extended beyond the rval_ref definition and you can use it as if you had ...


238

It declares an rvalue reference (standards proposal doc). Here's an introduction to rvalue references: http://www.artima.com/cppsource/rvalue.html. Here's a fantastic in-depth look at rvalue references by one of Microsoft's standard library developers: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2009/02/03/rvalue-references-c-0x-features-in-vc10-part-2.aspx. ...


187

I'd say the Rule of Three becomes the Rule of Three, Four and Five: Each class should explicitly define exactly one of the following set of special member functions: None Destructor, copy constructor, copy assignment operator In addition, each class that explicitly defines a destructor may explicitly define a move constructor and/or ...


81

Beta_ab&& Beta::toAB() const { return move(Beta_ab(1, 1)); } This returns a dangling reference, just like with the lvalue reference case. After the function returns, the temporary object will get destructed. You should return Beta_ab by value, like the following Beta_ab Beta::toAB() const { return Beta_ab(1, 1); } Now, it's properly ...


60

It is correct that std::move(x) is just a cast to rvalue - more specifically to an xvalue, as opposed to a prvalue. And it is also true that having a cast named move sometimes confuses people. However the intent of this naming is not to confuse, but rather to make your code more readable. The history of move dates back to the original move proposal in ...


56

This is not how std::make_pair is intended to be used; you are not supposed to explicitly specify the template arguments. The C++11 std::make_pair takes two arguments, of type T&& and U&&, where T and U are template type parameters. Effectively, it looks like this (ignoring the return type): template <typename T, typename U> [return ...


55

The two are very different and complementary tools. std::move deduces the argument and unconditionally creates an rvalue expression. This makes sense to apply to an actual object or variable. std::forward takes a mandatory template argument (you must specify this!) and magically creates an lvalue reference or an rvalue expression depending on what the type ...


47

It denotes an rvalue reference. Rvalue references will only bind to temporary objects, unless explicitly generated otherwise. They are used to make objects much more efficient under certain circumstances, and to provide a facility known as perfect forwarding, which greatly simplifies template code. In C++03, you can't distinguish between a copy of a ...


46

I've upvoted ildjarn's answer because I found it both accurate and humorous. :-) I'm providing an alternate answer because I'm assuming because of the title of the question that the OP might want to know why the standard says so. background C++ has implicitly generated copy members because if it didn't, it would've been still-born in 1985 because it was ...


37

What are the rules here? As there is only one parameter, the rule is that one of the three viable parameter initializations of that parameter must be a better match than both the other two. When two initializations are compared, either one is better than the other, or neither is better (they are indistinguishable). Without special rules about direct ...


35

It's my fault. (half-kidding, half-not). When I first showed example implementations of move assignment operators, I just used swap. Then some smart guy (I can't remember who) pointed out to me that the side effects of destructing the lhs prior to the assignment might be important (such as the unlock() in your example). So I stopped using swap for move ...


34

They are occasionally useful. The draft C++0x itself uses them in a few places, for example: template <class T> void ref(const T&&) = delete; template <class T> void cref(const T&&) = delete; The above two overloads ensure that the other ref(T&) and cref(const T&) functions do not bind to rvalues (which would otherwise ...


31

cant believe that nobody linked this: http://flamingdangerzone.com/cxx11/2012/08/15/rule-of-zero.html Basically article argues for "Rule of Zero". It is not appropriate for me to quote entire article but I believe this is the main point: (Rule of Zero) Classes that have custom destructors, copy/move constructors or copy/move assignment >operators should ...


28

There are a few occasions when it is appropriate, but they are relatively rare. The case comes up in one example when you want to allow the client to move from a data member. For example: template <class Iter> class move_iterator { private: Iter i_; public: ... value_type&& operator*() const {return std::move(*i_);} ... };


28

Put noexcept on your move constructor: TestClass(TestClass&& other) noexcept { Elaboration: I was going to give this one Pierre, but unfortunately the cppreference source is only approximately correct. In C++03 vector<T>::push_back(T) has the "strong exception guarantee". That means that if the push_back throws an exception, the vector ...


27

You take each one by value, like this: struct foo { foo(std::string s, bar b, qux q) : mS(std::move(s)), mB(std::move(b)), mQ(std::move(q)) {} std::string mS; bar mB; qux mQ; }; The initialization of the function parameters by the argument will either be a copy-constructor or move-constructor. From there, you just move the ...


27

Forget about C++0x for the moment. Move semantics are something that is language independent -- C++0x merely provides a standard way to perform operations with move semantics. Definition Move semantics define the behaviour of certain operations. Most of the time they are contrasted with copy semantics, so it would be useful to define them first. ...


25

I've thrown together some examples. I used GCC 4.4.4 in all of this. Simple case, without -std=c++0x First, I put together a very simple example with two classes that accept an std::string each. #include <string> #include <iostream> struct A /* construct by reference */ { std::string s_; A (std::string const &s) : s_ (s) ...


25

You seem to be confused as to what an rvalue reference is and how it relates to move semantics. First thing's first: && does not mean move. It is nothing more than a special reference type. It is still a reference. It is not a value; it is not a moved value; it is a reference to a value. Which means it has all of the limitations of a reference type. ...


24

If there is a move ctor for Foo, it should be selected. Function parameters are explicitly excluded from copy elision in return statements (FDIS ยง12.9p31, first bullet): in a return statement in a function with a class return type, when the expression is the name of a non-volatile automatic object (other than a function or catch-clause parameter) ...


24

Recycling temporaries is an interesting idea and you're not the only one who wrote functions that return rvalue references for this reason. In an older C++0x draft operator+(string&&,string const&) was also declared to return an rvalue reference. But this changed for good reasons. I see three issues with this kind of overloading and choice of ...


24

You could also use std::bind to capture the unique_ptr: std::function<void()> f = std::bind( [] (std::unique_ptr<int>& p) { *p=4; }, std::move(myPointer) );


23

None of them will copy, but the second will refer to a destroyed vector. Named rvalue references almost never exist in regular code. You write it just how you would have written a copy in C++03. std::vector<int> return_vector() { std::vector<int> tmp {1,2,3,4,5}; return tmp; } std::vector<int> rval_ref = return_vector(); Except ...


22

I believe that there are several places in D (such as returning structs) that D manages to make them moves whereas C++ would make them a copy. IIRC, the compiler will do a move rather than a copy in any case where it can determine that a copy isn't needed, so struct copying is going to happen less in D than in C++. And of course, since classes are ...


22

When you have a templated function like this you almost never want to overload. The T&& parameter is a catch anything parameter. And you can use it to get any behavior you want out of one overload. #include <iostream> #include <vector> using namespace std; template <class T> void display() { typedef typename ...


21

The compiler cannot break the "as-if" rule in this case. But you can use std::move to achieve the desired effect: object3 a(x); object2 b(std::move(a)); object1 c(std::move(b)); return c;


20

In the statement: B(B&& b) The parameter b is declared with the type: rvalue reference to B. In the statement: A(b) The expression b is an lvalue of type B. And lvalue expressions can not bind to rvalue references: specifically the rvalue reference in the statement: A(A&& a) This logic follows cleanly from other parts of the ...


19

X (std::string&& s) : S(s) { } That is not a constructor taking an rvalue, but a constructor taking an rvalue-reference. You should not take rvalue-references in this case. Rather pass by value and then move into the member: X (std::string s) : S(std::move(s)) { } The rule of thumb is that if you need to copy, do it in the interface.


18

When called, each member function has an implicit object parameter that *this references. So (a) these normal function overloads: void f(const T&); void f(T&&); when called like f(x); and (b) these member function overloads: struct C { void f() const &; void f() &&; }; when called like x.f() - both (a) and (b) dispatch ...



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