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25

There are reader macros for this purpose. See: http://www.cliki.net/infix For example: CL-USER 17 > '#I(a*(8*b^^2+1)+ 4*b*c*(4*b^^2+1) ) (+ (* A (+ (* 8 (EXPT B 2)) 1)) (* 4 B C (+ (* 4 (EXPT B 2)) 1))) ' is the usual quote. #I( some-infix-expression ) is the reader macro.


19

Working with lists without nil (or '()) would be like doing arithmetic without zero. Using only pairs without nil, how would we represent an empty list, or a singleton list '(1)? It gets worse: since lists don't have to be lists of atoms, but can contain other lists, how would we represent the nested list '(1 2 (3 4))? If we do the following conversions: ...


18

First, not all S-expressions represent lists; an expression such as foobar, representing a bare atom, is also considered an S-expression. As is the "cons cell" syntax, (car . cons), used in the somewhat rarer case when the cons doesn't itself point to the head of another list. Second, the term "S-expression" refers to the syntax - (items like this ...


15

Typing and s-expressions can be made to work together, see typed scheme. Partly it is a historical coincidence that s-expression languages are dynamically typed. These languages tend to rely more heavily on macros, and the ease of parsing and pattern-matching on s-expressions makes macro processing much easier. Most research on sophisticated macros happens ...


13

When Lisp was invented in the years from 1958 to 1960 it introduced a lot of features both as a language and an implementation (garbage collection, a self-hosting compiler, ...). Some features were inherited (with some improvements) from other languages (list processing, ...). The language implemented computation with functions. The s-expressions were more ...


13

Qi is a statically-typed Lisp dialect. Also, many other Lisp dialects have (optional) static typing. Java itself has very limited capabilities of this kind. The interesting question is not so much whether you can have metaprogramming and static typing, it's whether you can have dynamic metaprogramming be statically type-safe. There is Template Haskell ...


12

pyparsing comes with an S-expression parser as an example, see here.


12

In those Lisps, which have single namespace for variables and functions, your expression is valid. These are called Lisp-1. Scheme and Clojure are examples of such Lisps. In those Lisps, which have separate namespaces for variables and functions, your expression would be (funcall (f 2) 3 4). These are called Lisp-2. Common Lisp and Emacs Lisp are examples ...


10

Racket (formerly PLT Scheme) has a statically typed dialect, which is designed to work nicely with Scheme idioms -- including macros. (It works by type-checking the expansion results.)


9

The first says, I am absolutely sure, for all time, that the component item consists of a name and 0-n ports, and nothing else. The second states: The component item consists of a name and a list of ports, and I might decide to add some other things later.


9

Just use C-M-<space> at the start of the s-expression you'd like to use as your scope, to highlight it, and then do a query-replace as usual - it restricts itself to the active region.


9

S-expressions are a notation for data. Historically an s-expression (short for symbolic expression) is described as: symbols like FOO and BAR cons cells with s-expressions as its first and second element : ( expression-1 . expression-2 ) the list termination symbol NIL and a convention to write lists: ( A . ( B . NIL ) ) is simpler written as the list (A ...


8

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. But you never say how the code of Tregex or Tsurgeon is a mess. It sounds more like you can't deal with Java or greater abstraction and so you're looking for something concrete written in Python. There's nothing wrong with hand-writing tree matching and transformation functions. Indeed, we used to do that all the ...


8

In short, reader macros provide you with the ability to redefine the programming language's syntax within some delimited context. For example, you could implement regular expression literals (e.g. #"pattern") yourself given reader macros. Without them, you would be forced to properly escape regular expressions in string literals passed to re-pattern. BTW, ...


7

http://voodoo-slide.blogspot.com/2010/01/amplifying-c.html http://www.unmutual.info/software/scexp/ Related: http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=1071222 http://www.thinlisp.org/whitepaper.html http://www.bitc-lang.org/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PreScheme http://neontology.com/posts/2007/08/11/whats-nu


7

(defn read-all [input] (let [eof (Object.)] (take-while #(not= % eof) (repeatedly #(read input false eof)))))


6

A simple example. Common Lisp has a different reader syntax for vectors #() instead of []. But with the ability to create custom reader macros you can have a reader macro that traslates [2 3 4 5] to a vector in Common Lisp as well. Since most users won't be aware of the meaning of reader macros one has created they are rarely used and to avoid the ...


6

You can use a lexer+parser discipline to separate the details of lexical syntax (skipping spaces, mostly) from the actual grammar structure. That may seem overkill for such a simple grammar, but it's actually better as soon as the data you parse has the slightest chance of being wrong: you really want error location (and not to implement them yourself). A ...


5

This does the trick. It has minimal error checking. The interface to use is either the programmatic interface: (org-table-to-sexp <location-of-beginning-of-table> <location-of-end-of-table>) In which case it'll return the sexp you requested. If you wanted an interactive usage, you can call the following command to operate on the table in ...


5

The proto::expr<> type does not define constructors; hence, your problem. Try defining your types like this instead: typedef proto::literal< const char* > string_term_t; typedef proto::literal< uint32_t > uint32_term_t; typedef proto::literal< float > float_term_t;


5

For example in Common Lisp above is not valid. The syntax of Common Lisp does not generally allow lists as the head of a function call. You have to use FUNCALL to call a returned function value. (funcall (f 2) 3 4) In some other Lisp dialects it is allowed. Scheme is such a Lisp dialect. Scheme also evaluates the head of a function call expression.


5

A very important aspect of Lisp, and in fact an important aspect of many functional languages that followed, is that it is compositional. This means that the meaning of an expression is defined using the meanings of its subexpressions -- or, in other words, the definition of evaluation is something that is inherently recursive. In non-functional languages ...


5

All that is saying is that machine code can directly write machine instructions to memory and jump to those instructions to execute them; this is the basis of many attack vectors to break into software, in fact. The point is, when you're writing machine code, it's easy to generate machine code. But when you're writing in a compiled language like C, you ...


5

You are doing TRT, except for #' which turns the list (lambda () (+ 1 1)) into a function object. Just replace the sharp-quote (which is read as function) with a simple quote (which is read as quote) and it should work. Another change you might want to make is replacing print with write with argument :readably t: (write my-object :stream out :readably t) ...


5

An alternative to BrodieG's answer is to use mkNamed from Rinlinedfuns.h (which contains an example of how to use mkNamed). /* Construct named result list from variables containing the results */ const char *names[] = {"result_numeric", "result_numeric_vector", "result_integer", ""}; /* note the null string */ SEXP res = ...


5

In Racket it is possible to do a couple things in this spirit: You can define a struct and give it a prop:procedure. When an instance of the struct is supplied in an application, the procedure will be called. You can override the default #%app with your own function, to redefine application generally, and including things that aren't structs. For example ...


5

A machine language can alter itself while running. The last assembly programming i did was for MS DOS and resident program that i used to run before testing other programs. When my program misbehaved a keystroke switched to the resident program and could peek into the running program and alter it directly before resuming. It was quite handy since I didn't ...


5

You mention "record". By this I take it that you're referring to fixed-element structs/objects/compound data. For instance, in HtDP syntax: ;; a packet is (make-packet destination source text) where destination is a number, ;; source is a number, and text is a string. ... and you're asking about the pros and cons of representing a packet as a list of ...


5

This is a typical case of using Lisp. You would need a function that maps another function over the tree. Here is a procedural matching example using Common Lisp. There are matchers in Lisp that work over list structures, which could be used instead. Using a list matcher would simplify the example (see my other answer for an example using a pattern ...



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