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4

i don't know about SAS, but the problem could be quite universal in various languages, which is: languages fork commands without a shell, therefore your pipe is not recognized. you need to change your code into bash -c "echo abc | sed 's/b/\'$'\n'/". you need to deal with quotes, of course.


3

I can do the example for sev_alpha, though this can be generalized to the other two. I unfortunately cannot test this code as I am away from my office (and SAS license) this week, but this should work OK. There is a way of using PROC FORMAT that serves this type of use case. First, you write the PROC FORMAT like so: PROC FORMAT; VALUE fmt_alpha ...


3

OK, so I eventually found this bit of code in "Get Control of Your Input: Refer to Multiple Data Files Efficiently" a paper by Zhongping Zhai, Bloomington, IL and this works nicely for me: proc sql; create table all_datasets as select memname, crdate from dictionary.tables where libname="LIBNAME" and memname like "DSN%"; quit; Hope this ...


3

In your macro %update_1 you're creating a macro variable called &cnt, but when you call %update_2 you refer to another macro variable, &colcnt. Try fixing this reference and see if your code behaves as expected.


3

PROC MEANS has the ID statement, which allows you to do some of what you're asking for. Since PROC MEANS is summarizing data, if you want multiple rows per class value, you can't get that directly; your best bet is to merge the PROC MEANS results to the dataset using merge. However, if you want only one row per class value, and either you have variables ...


2

We created our own function to clean unwanted characters from strings using proc fcmp. In this case, our function cleans tab characters, line feeds, and carriage returns. proc fcmp outlib=common.funcs.funcs; /* REPLACE TARGET DESTINATION AS NECESSARY */ function clean(iField $) $200; bad_char_list = byte(10) || byte(9) || byte(13); ...


2

Here's an example of Robert Penridge's function, as a call routine with an array as an argument. This probably only works in 9.4+ or possibly later updates of 9.3, when permanent arrays began being allowed to be used as arguments in this way. I'm not sure if this could be done flexibly with an array as a function; without using macros (which require ...


2

I think you did not need a macro. Just type data master; set table1-table24; run;


2

For this answer I will cite Chang Chung's seminal paper, "Is This Macro Parameter Blank", as it is excellent and goes into great detail about your options here. The "best" option follows (ie, using the recommended method from the paper above). Note the initial %test macro doesn't return any rows for the blank parameter, while the second %test2 does. There ...


2

I see two easy ways to do this, depending on complexities you have. The core concept is using symget to get the macro variable's value. That allows you to construct a macro variable reference in the data step, which you otherwise can't do. I prefer this to storing the macro reference in the proc format as sparc_spread does, if there's a reason the value ...


2

While I probably would also transpose the dataset, it is possible to do so without transposing. data babies_doctors; set babies; do _i = 1 to nobs_doctors; set doctors point=_i nobs=nobs_doctors; array days day1-day6; if days[birth_Day] then output; end; run; This will not be fast, as it checks all rows in the dataset, but it's possible. ...


1

In list input, normally you are not allowed to supply an informat in the input statement; it is expected to be in an informat statement. data recessions; informat startdate enddate date7.; format startdate enddate date7.; input startdate enddate; datalines; 01MAR01 01NOV01 01DEC07 01JUN09 ; run; However, a colon turns it into modified list input, ...


1

Agree with Joe's answer. One good point they make in the paper is they are testing for blank, and their test will return true whether a parameter is null or has blanks in it. Sometimes it is useful have a test that differentiates between a parameter that is null and one that has blanks. The paper mentions %length(%superq( )) as a possible test for null. ...


1

I might shift the second dataset and then merge on day. Something like (in untested pseudo code): data new_1-new_6; set doctor; array day_1-day_6 day_{6} for i in 1 to 6: if day_{i} = 1 then do; day = i; output new_{i}; end; end; run; data stacked; set day_1-day_6; run; Then simply ...


1

The second appears more efficient - if it's valid SAS code. I'm not used to seeing a do just like that and don't want to test right now. Your variable appears to be a portion of the variable name in call symput. I would create a prefix and use that in my call symput code instead. I think this is easier to maintain and read. if attained_age='<60' ...


1

@Kay You can write this way. proc export data=ds1 dbms=xls outfile="ds1_data.xls" replace; putnames=NO; sheet=ds1; run; proc export data=ds2 dbms=xls outfile="ds1_data.xls" replace; putnames=NO; sheet=ds2; run; Give the sheet name and, change the dbms to xls and give the same location for the file to have more than one datasets in the same excel ...


1

I solved it with: /* Importiert die CSV Datei vom SAS Server*/ proc import datafile="xxxxx" out=mydata dbms=dlm replace; delimiter=';'; getnames=yes; run;


1

This works on EG 7.1, in the step 4 of 'import data', check 'Generalize import step to run outside SAS Enterprise Guide'. Doing this will generate data step that imports data directly without intermediate cache. You can also try to change your output destination on Step 1 to where you have plenty storeage.


1

SAS EG creates an intermediate delimited file and also caches the data. It is just the way it works to make the experience smooth for users across different platforms. To avoid it, how about you read in the data using a data step or PROC IMPORT? Have a go writing the code. If you fail, post it on Stack as a separate question with some obfuscated sample ...


1

If I understand you correctly, I don't think there is a specific function that will easily let you do this. You have two options - write your own logic to interpret the polynomial expressions, or use call execute to have SAS write out a (potentially very long) data step for you, assuming that the polynomials are all entered as valid data step code. Here's a ...


1

I'd create an empty dataset based on the existing one, and then use proc append to append the contents to it. Create some sample data for the second round of data: data new_data; age = 10; run; Create an empty dataset based on the original data: proc sql noprint; create table want like sashelp.class; quit; Append the data into the empty dataset, ...


1

So you have a MODEL dataset and a HAVE dataset, both with data in them. You want to create WANT dataset which has data from HAVE, with attributes of MODEL (formats, labels, and variable lengths). You can do this like: data WANT ; if 0 then set MODEL ; set HAVE ; run ; This works because when the DATA step compiles, SAS builds the Program Data Vector ...


1

Here is another alternative. If newline is the only thing you want to remove, then we are talking about Char only, you may leverage implicit array and Do over, data want; set have; array chr _character_; do over chr; chr=compress(chr,,'c'); end; run;


1

PROC MEANS is summarizing by class variables. If you want more variables in the output dataset you could list them on the class statement. PROC SQL will let you compute counts by a grouped variable, and then output a dataset with the same number of records as the input dataset with the count column added ("remerged summary statistic"). Are either of ...



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