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9

There is definitely a way to use the SAT solver you described to find all the solutions of a SAT problem, although it may not be the most efficient way. Just use the solver to find a solution to your original problem, add a clause that does nothing except rule out the solution you just found, use the solver to find a solution to the new problem, and so ...


8

This problem is NP-Hard as well. One can show an east reduction from Hitting Set: Hitting Set problem: Given sets S1,S2,...,Sn and a number k: chose set S of size k, such that for every Si there is an element s in S such that s is in Si. [alternative definition: the intersection between each Si and S is not empty]. Reduction: for an instance ...


6

Well, look at it this way: using a minimizing algorithm, you can compact any non-satisfiable expression to the literal false, right? This effectively solves SAT. So at least a complete minimizing algorithm is bound to be NP-complete NP hard.


6

Sure it can. When MiniSat[1] finds a solution s SATISFIABLE v 1 2 -3 0 (solution 1=True, 2=True, 3=False) then you have to put into the original CNF[2] a clause that bans this solution: -1 -2 3 0 (which means, either 1 or 2 must be False or 3 must be True). Then you solve again. You do this until the solver returns UNSAT i.e. that there are no more ...


6

You might want to take a look at Z3 (http://z3.codeplex.com/), or some other satisfiability modulo theories (SMT) solver. The problem you're stating involves linear integer arithmetic or possibly bitvectors, as far as i can tell. I think I would prefer having a solver with some understanding of these theories rather than encoding the problem with just ...


5

Disclosure, I'm the author of the Haskell picosat bindings you mentioned. SBV is really robust library that's been around for a while, it's good if you want an interface to external SMT or SAT solvers like Yices or Z3. Picosat is a much simpler library that I wrote simply because I wanted a library that could be installed simply without external ...


5

Working With SBV Working with SBV requires that you follow the types and realize the Predicate is just a Symbolic SBool. After that step it is important that you investigate and discover Symbolic is a monad - yay, a monad! Now that you you know you have a monad then anything in the haddock that is Symbolic should be trivial to combine to build any SAT you ...


5

If you want to generate something randomly, I suggest a nondeterminism monad, of which MonadRandom is a popular choice. I would suggest two inputs to this procedure: vars, the number of variables, and clauses the number of clauses. Of course you could always generate the number of clauses at random as well, using this same idea. Here's a sketch: import ...


5

To me it sounds more like some sort of clique problem. The way I see the problem, I'd set up the following graph: Vertices would be the students Two students would be connected by an edge if both of these following things hold: At least one of the two students wants to work with the other one. None of the two students doesn't want to work with the other ...


4

If you only have two variables per OR clause, then you have 2-SAT, which has a linear-time solution.


4

SBV is thread-safe. Comparing Z3 and Lingeling for SAT performance is not an easy task. I'd hazard a guess that they would be more or less the same unless you take your time to figure out the exact parameters to fine tune their internal heuristics. The good thing is that SBV provides a common interface, so you can change the solver by merely importing a ...


3

Using the types in hatt: import Data.Logic.Propositional import System.Random import Control.Monad.State import Data.Maybe import Data.SBV type Rand = State StdGen rand :: Random a => (a, a) -> Rand a rand = state . randomR runRand :: Rand a -> IO a runRand r = randomIO >>= return . fst . runState r . mkStdGen randFormula :: Rand ...


3

forSome_ is a member of the Provable class, so it seems it would suffice to define the instance Provable Expr. Almost all functions in SVB use Provable so this would allow you to use all of those natively Expr. First, we convert an Expr to a function which looks up variable values in a Vector. You could also use Data.Map.Map or something like that, but the ...


3

The easiest approach is to use the async library. Something like this, maybe. [res1, res2] <- mapConcurrently solve [dimacsList1, dimacsList2]


3

From The Complexity of Satisfiability Problems by Schaefer: We show that (assuming P != NP) SAT(S) is polynomial-time decidable only if at least one of the following conditions holds: (a) Every relation in S is satisfied when all variables are 0. (b) Every relation in S is satisfied when all variables are 1. (c) Every relation in S is ...


3

You could model this pretty easily as a clustering problem and you wouldn't even really need to define a space, you could actually just define the distances: Make two people very close if they both want to work together. Close if one of them wants to work with the other. Medium distance if there's just apathy. Far away if either one doesn't want to work ...


3

A more efficient method of finding all SAT solutions is described in the paper "All-SAT using Minimal Blocking Clauses" by Yu, Subramanyan, Tsiskaridze and Malik. The basic strategy of iteratively finding solutions and adding blocking clauses is the same, but the blocking clauses are generated using a novel idea, which reduces their size. The blocking ...


2

You probably don't need parsec to read statements in CNF, you can extract the variables with map (splitOn "|") . splitOn "&" - the rest is just assigning integers to variables: import qualified Data.Map as M import Data.List.Split import Control.Monad.State deleteMany c [] = [] deleteMany c (x:xs) | x`elem`c = deleteMany c xs | otherwise = ...


2

The proof that SAT is NP-hard (that is, that there's a polynomial-time reduction from every NP problem to SAT) is nontrivial. I'm going to try to give an intuition for how it works, but I'm not going to attempt to go over all the details. For that, you probably want to consult a textbook. Let's start off by taking any NP language L. By definition, the fact ...


2

First write this using standard notation: ∀x∀y(∃z(!A(x,z)∨!A(y,z))∨B(x,y)) Now, applying your second skolemisation rule: ∀x∀y((!A(x,f(x,y))∨!A(y,f(x,y)))∨B(x,y)) So I've replaced ∃z with a function containing all vars from outside. Now, this still isn't in Skolem normal form, because it isn't in conjuctive prenex normal form: the formulas still uses ...


2

You should look into SMT solvers, as they are the closest thing available to what you want. You're not writing in a Turing complete language with SMTs (no loops), but you can work with integer and real valued variables, Boolean logic, functions, basic arithmetic and arrays.


2

The incorrect result was due to a bug in the Z3 formula/expression preprocessor. The bug has been fixed, and is already part of the current release (v4.3.1). The bug affected benchmarks that use formulas of the form: (mod (+ a b)) or (mod (* a b)). We can retry the example online here, and get the expected result.


2

You raise a valid point. Peter Stuckey had a presentation "There Are No CNF Problems" on the SAT Conference 2013. You'll find the slides here. For practical applications it would be nice to have a high-level problem description language like Stuckey's MiniZinc. Encoding the problem in CNF is all too often tedious and error-prone. To answer your question: ...


2

I don't know of any tools that converts a FlatZinc file to and CNF (DIMACS) file. (The MiniZinc distribution has a program to convert flatzinc to XCSP format. Perhaps there's a tool for XCSP to CNF?) However, there are some SAT based/inspired solvers that might be better, e.g. minicsp, fzn2smt. There problem is that they - as you mention - don't support the ...


1

One of the techniques used to make max-SMT work is the following: Augment/formulate the input to allow counting of the number of clauses that evaluate to True in a model(assignment). Call this new formula F, and let the variable K hold the count. Perform a binary search on F for optimal (max) possible value of K, by repeatedly calling solver for ...


1

Yes there are some that are available in source, see e.g., here or here or here.


1

Since you are a scala programmer, you might want to use directly a scala library such as Scarab http://kix.istc.kobe-u.ac.jp/~soh/scarab/ Such tool offers you a modeling of the problem in Scala with a resolution of the problem with a SAT solver.


1

So what you are asking is: Given a boolean expression B and a CNF C, is there a way to tell if they are equisatisfiable? Or in other words: Exists a model that satisfies B but not C, or that satisfies C but not B? If no such model exists then both are equisatisfiable. My solution to that problem would be the following: I'd use a known-good software ...


1

2 edits later, finally figured it out: (set-logic BV) (declare-fun var1 () (_ BitVec 32)) ; a is a constant (declare-fun var2 () (_ BitVec 32)) ; a is a constant (declare-fun var3 () (_ BitVec 32)) ; a is a constant (assert( and (= var1 var2) (= var3 (bvsub var1 var2)))) (check-sat) (get-model)


1

Sorry, there is no get-value for SMTLIB 1.2. SMTLIB 1.2 is deprecated and you can do everything possible with SMTLIB 1.2 with 2.0 format instead, so there should be no real reason to use v1.2 of the syntax.



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