Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Assuming DAO.get returns an Option[User], you can use a for comprehension to specify what should happen if all 3 options are a Some. Then, use getOrElse to specify what should happen otherwise. val success: Option[String] = for { x <- DAO.get(token) y <- DAO.get(token) z <- DAO.get(token) } yield "retrieved 3 users" success getOrElse ...


6

You can just add indexes to both lists and diff then: val diff = l1.zipWithIndex.diff(l2.zipWithIndex) -> List((2,1)) // different value is 2 and index is 1


5

You'll want to read the book, where it explains that cons :: prepends to the thing on the right. one way to initialize new lists is to string together elements with the cons operator, with Nil as the last element. scala> List(1,2) :: Nil res1: List[List[Int]] = List(List(1, 2)) The book also explains about operators ending in a colon. If you ...


3

Scala collections have a hierarchy, illustrated below. You just need to choose which level of the hierarchy is appropriate for your use-case. Iterable could be a good candidate for you if you want Maps and Sets to be allowed. Of course, you can then only use those functions which are available at that level of the hierarchy, you wouldn't be able to use any ...


3

scala> val l = List((List('a, 'b, 'c) -> 'x), List('c, 'd, 'e) -> 'y) l: List[(List[Symbol], Symbol)] = List((List('a, 'b, 'c),'x), (List('c, 'd, 'e),'y)) scala> l.flatMap { case (innerList, c) => innerList.map(_ -> c) } res0: List[(Symbol, Symbol)] = List(('a,'x), ('b,'x), ('c,'x), ('c,'y), ...


3

You can also just use sliding: l.sliding(2).toList res1: List[Seq[Int]] = List(List(1, 2), List(2, 3), List(3, 4))


3

Because the colon means that the function is called on the object to the right try Seq(4, 5) ++=: lb


2

When used in the infix position, methods ending with a : are right-associative. You can either call the method on lb using a ., or reverse the arguments : scala> lb.++=:(Seq(4,5)) res3: lb.type = ListBuffer(4, 5, 1, 2, 3) scala> Seq(7,6,8) ++=: lb res4: lb.type = ListBuffer(7, 6, 8, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3)


2

Given val listOfInts = List(1,2,3), and you want the final result as List(List(1),List(2),List(3)). Another nice trick I can think of is sliding(Groups elements in fixed size blocks by passing a "sliding window" over them) scala> val listOfInts = List(1,2,3) listOfInts: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3) scala> listOfInts.sliding(1) res6: ...


2

Ok I got to know about the zip method: xs zip xs.tail


2

val indexes = (l1 zip l2 zipWithIndex).filter(x => x._1._1 != x._1._2).map(_._2) val indexesWithDiffValues = (l1 zip l2 zipWithIndex).filter(x => x._1._1 != x._1._2) this code will give you a list of indexes you want.


1

How about this: val num_bins = 20 val mx = a.max.toDouble val mn = a.min.toDouble val hist = a .map(x=>(((x.toDouble-mn)/(mx-mn))*num_bins).floor.toInt) .groupBy(x=>x) .map(x=>x._1->x._2.size) .toSeq .sortBy(x=>x._1) .map(x=>x._2)


1

You can simply map over this list to create a List of Lists. It maintains Immutability and functional approach. scala> List(1,2,3).map(List(_)) res0: List[List[Int]] = List(List(1), List(2), List(3)) Or you, can also use Tail Recursion : @annotation.tailrec def f(l:List[Int],res:List[List[Int]]=Nil) :List[List[Int]] = { if(l.isEmpty) res else ...


1

Below is copy and pasted from the Scala REPL with added print statement to see what is happening: scala> val list = Seq()::Nil list: List[Seq[Nothing]] = List(List()) scala> val listOfInts = List(1,2,3) listOfInts: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3) scala> listOfInts.foreach { case x=> | println(list::List(x)) | } ...


1

There are tutorials on the documentation page. There is a blurb for ListBuffer, if you swing that way. Otherwise, scala> var xs = List.empty[List[Int]] xs: List[List[Int]] = List() scala> (1 to 10) foreach (i => xs = xs :+ List(i)) scala> xs res9: List[List[Int]] = List(List(1), List(2), List(3), List(4), List(5), List(6), List(7), List(8), ...


1

With Spark you can solve your problem with: object App { def main(args: Array[String]) { val input = Seq((List("A", "B", "C"), "X"), (List("C", "D", "E"), "Y")) val conf = new SparkConf().setAppName("Simple Application").setMaster("local[4]") val sc = new SparkContext(conf) val rdd = sc.parallelize(input) val result = rdd.flatMap { ...


1

I think that the RDD flatMapValues suits this case best. val A = List((List(A,B,C),X),(List(A,B,C),Y)) val rdd = sc.parallelize(A) val output = rdd.map(x=>(x._2,x._1)).flatMapValues(x=>x) which will map X with every value in the List(A,B,C) resulting in RDD of pairs of RDD[(X,A),(X,B),(X,C)...(Y,A),(Y,B),(Y,C)]


1

exists should help you: if (List(user1, user2, user3).exists(_.isEmpty)) // error ... else // ok ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible