Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Use unzip: scala> (1 to 5).unzip { x => x -> x * 3 } res0: (Vector(1, 2, 3, 4, 5),Vector(3, 6, 9, 12, 15))


6

You can do this in the following way: object myApp { def main(args: Array[String]) { val myMap = new MyLinkedHashMap[Int,String]() myMap.add(1, "a") // Map(1 -> a) myMap.add(2, "b") // Map(1 -> a, 2 -> b) myMap.add(3, "c") // Map(1 -> a, 2 -> b, 3 -> c) myMap.add(4, "d") // Map(1 ...


6

You're very close. Try something like: collection.filter(x => Try(x.predicate).getOrElse(false))


4

Depends on which you want to do. In the case of filter, the predicate still needs to be boolean, and Try[T] is most certainly not. Try does have handy getOrElse and toOption methods which could help us convert cases of Failure to None. collection.filter(x => Try(predicate).getOrElse(false)) For map if you wish to throw out the failures, you can do ...


4

Jasper-M provided a good answer to your second question (why == works but pattern matching fails). As to your first, there is no equivalent to Nil for ArrayBuffer. The reason is that List is defined using scala's notion of Algebraic Data Types (ADT), while ArrayBuffer is not. Take a look at the source for ArrayBuffer. It's implemented as a regular class, ...


4

It's possible to do this in a very clean and generic way using Shapeless 2.0's LabelledGeneric type class. First we define a type class that will show how to partition a list with elements of some algebraic data type into an HList of collections for each constructor: import shapeless._, record._ trait Partitioner[C <: Coproduct] extends DepFn1[List[C]] ...


4

If you just want to add a single method to a class, then subclassing may not be the way to go. Scala's collections library is somewhat complicated, and leaf classes aren't always amenable to subclassing (one might start by subclassing HashSet, but this would start you on a journey down a deep rabbit hole). Perhaps a simpler way to achieve your goal would be ...


3

I'm not 100% sure about this, because I haven't looked too much at the implementation, but for any HashSet there's an implicit ordering based on the hashCode (of type Int) of the values that are already in the Set. That means that for any Set instance, calls to head and tail will respect that ordering, so it won't be the same element. Even more, successive ...


3

Getting an immutable Scala map is a little tricky because the conversions provided by the collections library return all return mutable ones, and you can't just use toMap because it needs an implicit argument that the Java compiler of course won't provide. A complete solution with that implicit argument looks like this: import ...


3

val emptyBaskets: (List[Apple], List[Pear]) = (Nil, Nil) def separate(fruits: List[Fruit]): (List[Apple], List[Pear]) = { fruits.foldRight(emptyBaskets) { case (f, (as, ps)) => f match { case a @ Apple(_, _) => (a :: as, ps) case p @ Pear(_, _) => (as, p :: ps) } } }


3

An "immutable" solution would use your mutable solution except not show you the collections. I'm not sure there's a strong reason to think it's okay if library designers do it but anathema for you. However, if you want to stick to purely immutable constructs, this is probably about as good as it gets: def segregate4(basket: Set[Fruit]) = { val apples = ...


2

I'm a little confused by your examples. The return type of each of your "segregate" methods is a Tuple2, yet you want to be able to add more types of Fruit freely. Your method will need to return something with dynamic length (Iterable/Seq/etc) since the length of a tuple needs to be deterministic at compile time. With that said, maybe I'm oversimplifying ...


2

T needs to have a lower bound of Null because not all values in Scala are nullable. The types that extends AnyVal are represented by JVM primitives which can't be null; for example, there's no such thing as a null Int. Also, look at the method signature of Array.fill: def fill[T: ClassTag](n: Int)(elem: => T): Array[T] The context bound T: ClassTag ...


2

First, method Array.fill requires implicit ClassTag in scope. Second, null has type Null, so you need to cast it to T. Third, array value should be lazy because ClassTag instance will be available only on HasArray creation. trait HasArray[T] { implicit def ev: ClassTag[T] def size: Int lazy val array = Array.fill[T](size)(null.asInstanceOf[T]) } ...


2

This will do what you want: def removeOldestEntry[K](m: scala.collection.mutable.LinkedHashMap[K, _]): m.type = m -= m.head._1 (Kudos to Jasper-M for pointing out that head will give the oldest entry)


2

Seems like Streams have a larger memory footprint. Sounds like they keep an extra data cache to perform faster evaluations. Also, a good reference: Stream vs Views vs Iterators


2

Relying on head and tail on Set (without ordering) is risky at best. In your case, simply get an Iterator from your Set first with theSet.toIterator, then recurse over the iterator. The iterator guarantees that the first element will be different from the others, of course.


2

Using List.span, like this def keyMultiSpan(l: List[(Int,Int)]): List[List[(Int,Int)]] = l match { case Nil => List() case h :: t => val ms = l.span(_._1 == h._1) ms._1 :: keyMultiSpan(ms._2) } Hence let val items = List((1, 2), (1, 5), (1, 3), (2, 9), (3, 7), (1, 5), (1, 4)) and so keyMultiSpan(items).map { _.head._1 } res: ...


2

If you just want to throw out sequential duplicates, you can do something like this: def unchain[A](items: Seq[A]) = if (items.isEmpty) items else { items.head +: (items zip items.drop(1)).collect{ case (l,r) if r != l => r } } That is, just compare the list to a version of itself shifted by one place, and only keep the items which are different. ...


2

Have a look at Dynamic: import scala.language.dynamics class Wrapper(m: Map[String, Any]) extends Dynamic { def selectDynamic(name: String) = { m(name) } } object Demo { def main(args: Array[String]) { val map = Map("a" -> true, "b" -> "hello", "c" -> 5) val w = new Wrapper(map) println(w.a) println(w.b) } ...


2

I hope you understand by asking this question that you will loose all compile time guarantees when you rely on runtime data. If this is really what you want then you can rely on Dynamic: object X extends App { import scala.language.dynamics class D(fields: Map[String, Any]) extends Dynamic { def selectDynamic(str: String): Any = ...


1

How about this? object Hist { type Bins = Map[Double, List[Double]] // artificially increasing bucket length to overcome last-point issue private val Epsilon = 0.000001 def histogram(data: List[Double], binsCount: Int) = { require(data.length > binsCount) val sorted = data.sorted val min = sorted.head ...


1

hmm couldn't find something out of the box but this will do it def groupz[T](list:List[T]):List[T] = { list match { case Nil => Nil case x::Nil => List(x) case x::xs if (x == xs.head) => groupz(xs) case x::xs => x::groupz(xs) }} //now let's add this functionality to List class implicit def ...


1

Here is a succinct but inefficient solution: def pythonGroupBy[T, U](items: Seq[T])(f: T => U): List[List[T]] = { items.foldLeft(List[List[T]]()) { case (Nil, x) => List(List(x)) case (g :: gs, x) if f(g.head) == f(x) => (x :: g) :: gs case (gs, x) => List(x) :: gs }.map(_.reverse).reverse } And here is a better one, that only ...


1

Try: val items = List((1, 2), (1, 5), (1, 3), (2, 9), (3, 7), (1, 5), (1, 4)) val res = compress(items.map(_._1)) /** Eliminate consecutive duplicates of list elements **/ def compress[T](l : List[T]) : List[T] = l match { case head :: next :: tail if (head == next) => compress(next :: tail) case head :: tail => head :: compress(tail) case Nil ...


1

line_num(i) returns the number of lines in the file i. So you can write it: def line_num(i: Int) : Int = { Source.fromFile(fileNames(i)).getLines.size } In your original function, you return a Seq(Int) which is the sequence of the length of each line in the file, which does not correspond to the expected return type.


1

Note that Ionuț G. Stan's answer is the same as: (1 to 5).unzip{ x => (x, x * 3)} which makes how to get triples of collections back even clearer: (1 to 5).unzip3{ x => (x, x * 3, x * 10)}


1

Here is a solution that doesn't use the Child class or require changes to collapse: implicit def collapseBlog(blog: Blog, relations: List[Relation[Post, Comment]])(implicit f: (Post, List[Comment]) => Post) = { blog.copy(posts = collapse(relations)) } We are taking advantage of recursive implicit resolution - collapseBlog will use collapsePost as its ...


1

For this question about avoiding unnecessary computation, I made some benchmarks. Of all the answers, streams had the worst performance by far: 8x slower than Iterator, and more than 2x slower than the next-slowest answer. Streams seem to add a lot of overhead.


1

decs.map(functionTrans _).toMap should suffice.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible