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7

Yes, it's possible, but you have to specify the types, and since this is a cast that can fail at runtime, you'll get the results wrapped in Option: import shapeless._, syntax.std.traversable._ val hlists = frame.map(_.toHList[Int :: String :: String :: Boolean :: HNil]) Now hlists has type Vector[Option[Int :: String :: String :: Boolean :: HNil]], and ...


7

You need to provide a ClassTag for the pattern match to actually work: import scala.reflect.ClassTag def co[T: ClassTag](a: Array[Any]) = a.collect { case v: T => v }


6

List is not a good fit if you need random element access/update. From the documentation: This class is optimal for last-in-first-out (LIFO), stack-like access patterns. If you need another access pattern, for example, random access or FIFO, consider using a collection more suited to this than List. More generally, what you need is an indexed sequence ...


5

There is not such a function in the Scala standard library. But doing it the "hard way" is only about twice as slow as doing it the "efficient way", so I would recommend not worrying about it. (a partition b can be used to produce (a & b, a diff b).)


4

Explicitly convert every inner Vector to Tuple3: vector.map { case Vector(f, s, t) => Tuple3(f, s, t) }.toList If you have vectors of variadic size you can use more general approach: def toTuple(seq: Seq[_]): Product = { val clz = Class.forName("scala.Tuple" + seq.size) clz.getConstructors()(0).newInstance(seq.map(_.asInstanceOf[AnyRef]): ...


4

It's because the :+ operator expects a single item, not a sequence. So what you're trying to do is comparable to var y:List[String] = List("b", List("a")), which isn't valid. You can see this in the documentation of Seq, which shows the type of :+ to be A => Seq[A]. I think you probably want to use the ++ operator instead.


4

Find first match; retrieve second part of tuplet or 0 l1.find(_._1 == "A").map(_._2).getOrElse(0)


3

There is no such single method. As you say, you can use map followed by toMap. If you are concerned about the intermediary list you are creating, you might consider using breakOut as the implicit second argument to map: import scala.collection.breakOut val map: Map[Int, String] = collection.map(x => (x._1, x._2.toString + " seconds"))(breakOut) You ...


3

scalaz has a fproduct method for Functors which returns things in the right shape for calling .toMap on the result: scala> import scalaz._,Scalaz._ import scalaz._ import Scalaz._ scala> val collection = List(1, 2, 3) collection: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3) scala> collection.fproduct(_.toString + " seconds").toMap res0: ...


3

First, it's advisable to use JavaConverters instead to get an explicit conversion to avoid accidentally converting multiple times. You should be able to use breakOut on map by specifying the expected result type: import scala.collection.breakOut import scala.collection.JavaConverters._ val stringMap: java.util.HashMap[String, Long] = new ...


3

You could do this with only using foldLeft: val t = List(("Gregor", "Math", 6), ("Mark", "Mat", 33), ("Gregor", "IT", 44), ("Jane", "Math", 3), ("Mark", "Geography", 44), ("Gregor", "sdf", 32)) val res = t.foldLeft(Map[String, Int]()) { case(m, (n, _, _)) => m + (n -> (m.getOrElse(n, 0) + 1)) }.toList


3

Use JavaConverters: import scala.collection.JavaConverters._ val yourJavaList = // ... val scalaList = yourJavaList.asScala


2

This is one possible solution, however in this case I think it's also possible to switch to var + immutable ArrayBuffer and use filter. Also note that this code is not thread safe import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger import scala.collection.mutable.ArrayBuffer case class Task(id: Int, label: String) object Task { private val ...


2

The cleanest way for scala (without scalaz) seems to be: Option(list).filter(_.nonEmpty).getOrElse(List(1,2,3))


2

There is a little nasty rule exists in scala pattern matching, if some variable starts with an Upper case letter the it matches against its value, so you can rename val l2 = "A" to val L2 = "A" the you the following would work - scala> l1.collectFirst{ case (L2, i, _) => i }.getOrElse(0) res0: Int = 12


1

My guts tell me that you are probably better off not implementing a specialized FQN collection, but hide the collection as part of the internal implementation of FQN, effectivly removing the corresponding operations from the interface of FQN. What I mean is, you should ask yourself whether the world must really see FQN as a Seq and be able use all ...


1

Try this: def singletonSet(elem: Int): Set[Int] = Set(elem) This way you will call the Set.apply method creating a Set with the single element of e. Your intuition was the other way around for Int=>Boolean and Set[Int].


1

You need to provide a type parameter to make it generic def singletonSet[A](a: => A): Set[A] = Set(a) The => avoids the argument element to be evaluated before putting it in the Set. Incidentally, what you're trying to implement is exactly the point method of an Applicative typeclass. Here's the scalaz version of it. Using scalaz, you can do ...


1

In Rx Java materialized Observable is a list of notifications - and OnCompleted/OnError is the last and only one notification. Same for RxScala i think. Threating each message as Success seems to be incorrect - because last Success/Failure is success/failure for whole sequence, so it's better to use Try for OnError/OnCompleted message only (but it will be ...


1

You can use flatten to get a List[WebElement] and then convert it to Set def collect(patterns: Set[String]): Set[String] = { patterns.map{ pattern => driver.findElementsByXPath(pattern).asScala.map{ link => link.getAttribute("href") } }.flatten.toSet }


1

Is this OK? scala> val seq = "ABCDEFG".toIndexedSeq seq: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Char] = Vector(A, B, C, D, E, F, G) scala> seq(3) res0: Char = D scala> val ept = Seq.empty[Char] ept: Seq[Char] = List() scala> ept(3) java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException: 3 at ...


1

A bit rough on the edges, but maybe something like : def getFilesMatchingRegex(dir: String, regex: util.matching.Regex) = { new java.io.File(dir).listFiles .filter(file => regex.findFirstIn(file.getName).isDefined) .map (file => io.Source.fromFile(file)) } Note that this won't fetch files in sub-directories, doesn't have more ...


1

scala> import reflect.io._, Path._ import reflect.io._ import Path._ scala> val r = """.*\.scala""".r r: scala.util.matching.Regex = .*\.scala scala> "/home/amarki/tmp".toDirectory.files map (_.name) flatMap { case n @ r() => Some(n) case _ => None } res0: Iterator[String] = non-empty iterator scala> .toList res1: List[String] = ...



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