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7

Well this is what happens (I think): You create a concurrent java hash map with new java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentHashMap[String,String]() Then you convert it to an immutable scala Map with toMap As toMapis not defined on java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentHashMap an implicit conversion to a mutable scala map is applied. And toMap then makes of this mutable ...


5

Yes it would work, and there is even a built-in akka pattern for it - pipe: import akka.pattern.pipe override def receive = { case msg => .... // do something Future { ... // calculate response response } pipeTo sender() } There are, however some caveats in your code you should note: sender is a function, therefore, when the ...


4

It seems that you loop all the Integer value and schedule a print of each after 30 seconds at once. Though not tested try to increment the duration to 30 for each loop. class TestActor extends Actor { override def receive: Receive = { case num: Int => println(num) case Tick => loopAndPrint } def loopAndPrint = { val list = List(1, ...


4

Unlike Java, the default collections in Scala are immutable. If you take a look at the api for Map (found here) you'll see that Map lacks a method put. So the exception is telling you, quite rightly, that Map can't do what you want it to do. If you want to fill the Map with values: Map("abc" -> "def") By the way, an immutable collection is already ...


2

This can be solved in scala using an implicit typeclass. Create a factory trait with concrete implementations for each of your types: object MyTraitFactory { def apply[T](param1: Boolean, param2: Boolean)(implicit factory: MyTraitCreator[T]): MyTrait[T] = { // call the typeclass create method factory.create(param1, param2) } // factory trait ...


2

Operation in infix notation have a precedence defined to them, as mentioned in the specification: The precedence of an infix operator is determined by the operator's first character. Characters are listed below in increasing order of precedence, with characters on the same line having the same precedence: (all letters) | ^ & = ! < > : + ...


2

WartRemover can give you warnings for some of the more common problems with partial functions in the Scala core library.


2

In Scala, generics are erased at runtime, which means that the runtime type of List[Int] and List[Boolean] is actually the same. This is because the JVM as a whole erases generic types. All this is due because the JVM wanted to remain backwards compatible way back when generics were first introduced... There is a way around this in Scala using a ClassTag, ...


1

lit function is for adding literal values as a column import org.apache.spark.sql.functions._ df.withColumn("D", lit(750))


1

You can already do this with the existing API, you don't need the workarounds: def constantByName[T <: Enumeration](enum: T, key: String): Option[T#Value] = { enum.values.find(_.toString == key) } It works because .values gives you a List[Enum#Value] and you can just look into that for matching.


1

I assume your GetFromDatabase returns either null or PushMessage, so in order to pattern match correctly, you need to wrap it into Option: val push = Option(GetFromDatabase) match { case Some(pushMessage) => pushMessage case None => new PushMessage(param1, param2...) } Or (bad style, but gives an understanding of how it works): // Option(...


1

I recommend you use Scala's built-in Enumeration class. For your example, that would be object EventDesc extends Enumeration { type EventDesc = Value val PrefAdded = Value("PreferedLabelAdded") val PrefChanged = Value("PreferedLabelChanged") ... } Then, you can access the constant enumeration values as EventDesc.PrefAdded or EventDesc.PrefChanged. ...


1

You can extend the scala.Enumeration class to create your enumeration: object EventDesc extends Enumeration { type EventDesc = Value val PreferedLabelAdded, PreferedLabelChanged, UNKNOWN = Value } val eventDesc = EventDesc.withName("PreferedLabelAdded") if (eventDesc == EventDesc.PreferedLabelChanged) { Console.println(eventDesc) } You can ...


1

The best solution is to name your columns explicitly, e.g., df .groupBy('a, 'b) .agg( expr("count(*) as cnt"), expr("sum(x) as x"), expr("sum(y)").as("y") ) If you are using a dataset, you have to provide the type of your columns, e.g., expr("count(*) as cnt").as[Long]. You can use the DSL directly but I often find it to be more verbose ...


1

There are two versions of orderBy, one that works with strings and one that works with Column objects (API). Your code is using the first version, which does not allow for changing the sort order. You need to switch to the column version and then call the desc method, e.g., myCol.desc. Now, we get into API design territory. The advantage of passing Column ...


1

There is only one function (A => Foo) for concrete classes with different implementations. I don't see here big advantage of using a type class. I would start considering a type class when one of arguments is generic. As suggested in comments one could extract pattern matching into fold def fold[F](a: A)(f1: A1 => F, ..., f4: A4 => F): F = a match ...


1

The problem is, that sender may no longer be valid, when the future is performed. You have a couple of options, here are two from the top of my head: You can capture the sender before the future: override def receive = { case msg => .... // do something val replyTo = sender Future { ... // calculate response replyTo ! ...


1

import com.typesafe.scalalogging.StrictLogging class MyService extends AbstractService { def service1(input: String): String = common(input) { id => id.toString } def service2(input: String): String = common(input) { id => id.toString.toLowerCase } } trait AbstractService extends StrictLogging { def common(input: ...


1

The solution - you need beans in java implementation (setters were missing): public class Product { @Required public String ean; @Required public String name; public String description; public String getEan() { return ean; } public String getName() { return name; } public String getDescription() ...


1

Spark does not support dataframe (or dataset or RDD) nesting. You can break down your problem into two separate steps. First, you need to parse JSON and build a case class consisting entirely of types Spark supports. This problem has nothing to do with Spark so let's assume you've coded this as: def buildMyCaseClass(json: String): MyCaseClass = { ... } ...


1

There are many problems with your code: You are using def extrastUdf =, which creates a function for registering a UDF as opposed to actually creating/registering a UDF. Use val extrasUdf = instead. You are mixing value types in your map (String and Int), which makes the map be Map[String, Any] as Any is the common superclass of String and Int. Spark does ...


1

I think the difference in your expected behavior and what you were actually seeing is that eventsByPersistenceId is a "live" stream. That means that not only will it return events starting within the offset range you supplied (you are starting at 0 and going to Long.MaxValue, so everything), but if will keep sending you new events as they come in. If you ...



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