Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

You could use something like this, if you want to define the operation for all types convertible to a Comparable: def exclude[T <% Ordered[T]](a: T, b: T) = a > b def include[T <% Ordered[T]](a: T, b: T) = a >= b def operation[T <% Ordered[T]](a: T, b: T) = if (includeValue) include(a, b) else exclude(a, b)


-1

Here's a general solution to recursive loading of unmanaged JARs (for sbt 0.13.x): http://stackoverflow.com/a/29357699/1348306


0

I wanted to implement something like vim's pathogen and here's what I came up with: unmanagedJars in Compile ++= { val libs = baseDirectory.value / "lib" val subs = (libs ** "*") filter { _.isDirectory } val targets = ( (subs / "target") ** "*" ) filter {f => f.name.startsWith("scala-") && f.isDirectory} ((libs +++ subs +++ targets) ** ...


2

You can use diff instead of slice: list.map(set => set diff (list diff List(set)).flatten.toSet) //Alternative with filterNot list.map(set => set.filterNot((list diff List(set)).flatten.contains)) diff works here since it only removes one instance of the element, and Set[Int] has a nice equals method: List(Set(1), Set(1, 2)) diff List(Set(1)) ...


0

_ > _ represents a function that accepts two parameters. It calls the > method on the first parameter, and passes the second to it as an argument. We can't simply use wild-card types here, because not every type has a > method. Nor does it make sense to have a function from unknown to unknown like this. We can try something simple, like making them ...


0

Is there something very entirely inherent to the JVM, that prevents the JVM switching the context of a thread to new tasks - when the thread is idle - as implemented by operating system process schedulers? Mostly the need that such switch has to be done cooperatively. Every single blocking method must be wrapped or re-implemented in a way that allows ...


0

The problem is in this line (reformatted for clarity): Apply( Select(New(Ident(classSymbol.primaryConstructor)), termNames.CONSTRUCTOR), List() ) You're essentially selecting the constructor twice. You could just drop primaryConstructor: Apply( Select(New(Ident(classSymbol)), termNames.CONSTRUCTOR), List() ) Using ApplyConstructor would also ...


3

Definitely it seems that this case is a lack of optimization from the Scala compiler. Sure, the match construct is much (much much) powerful than the switch/case in Java, and it is a lot harder to optimize it, but it could detect these special cases in which a simple hash comparison would apply. Also, I don't think this case will show many times in ...


1

I think the problem is that you're thinking about Scala from a Java point of view (I think you're also prematurely optimizing, but hey). I would think that the solution you want is to instead memoize your mapping. You've got a function that maps from String -> Int, right? So do this: class Memoize1[-T, +R](f: T => R) extends (T => R) { import ...


5

:+ appends a single element to a List. So you are appending a List[Int] to a List[Int], resulting in something like (if a and b are both set to List(1, 2)): List(1, 2, List(1, 2)) Scala calculates the most common type between the element type (Int) and the thing you append (List[Int]), which is Any. You probably wanted to concatenate two lists: val x: ...


0

Or perhaps an implicit conversion from ExtMesh to Mesh would handle the "old" interface (without using the extend Mesh), allowing me to only add new functionality? I learned meanwhile this is quite easy, as one can provide implicit conversions in a companion object: class ExtMesh { Mesh mesh def ExtFunc3(a:String, b:Float) } object ExtMesh { ...


-1

I found a blog to build the spark. Below is the link. https://vanwilgenburg.wordpress.com/2014/10/26/fix-the-classpath-in-spark/ This blog helped a lot to build without any errors.


0

Since you're defining your map function using an anonymous inner class, the containing class must also be Serializable. Define your map function as a separate class or make it a static inner class. From the Java documentation (http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/platform/serialization/spec/serial-arch.html): Note - Serialization of inner classes ...


0

You may had downloaded the pre-built version of Spark. If its a pre-built you dont need to execute built tool command(sbt) and it wont be available.


3

Try changing your code to something like this: object poisson_sample_size extends App { val t1 = 0.0025 val t2 = 0.0030 val result = calculate(t1, t2) println(result) def calculate(theta1: Double, theta2: Double): Double = { val num = 4 val den = ((theta1 + theta2) / 2) - math.sqrt(theta1 * theta2) num / den } } ...


0

If I understand it correctly, to maintain the intended result for the function main you just need to insert x as the last statement in your function, which has an implicit return meaning in Scala. object poisson_sample_size extends App { def main(theta1: Double, theta2: Double): Double = { val num = 4 val den = ((theta1 + theta2) / 2) - ...


5

It will work if you call deep on the Arrays: assertResult((12345678L, Array[Byte](0.toByte, 2.toByte).deep))((12345678L, Array[Byte](0.toByte, 2.toByte).deep)) This actually just converts the Array to an IndexedSeq so it can do the equals comparison (instead of the default reference comparison on Array). It seems as though assertResult does this for you ...


1

That is correct, per Java's array equality (or lack of) behavior. As seen in the message ([B@2473d930) the Scala Array type is a fancy skin for a Java-array; but it can't change how a Java array instance actually works. The most straight forward solution is probably to use a collection type that properly implements == (aka Object.equals). Tuple1(Array(1)) ...


0

Maybe I'm misunderstanding, but I don't think you need the L at all. case class Kls(arg1: Int, arg2: Int) { def apply() = arg1 + arg2 } abstract class Node[L, R]{ def call(args: L): R } import shapeless._ object Node { def apply[R](implicit gen: LabelledGeneric[R]): Node[gen.Repr, R] = new Node[gen.Repr, R] { def call(args: gen.Repr): R = ...


1

You can use Play's built-in JSON validation for this quite easily. You don't need to add any third-party dependencies for this. case class WebCategory(topGroupName: String, topGroupID: String, webCategoryName : String, webCategoryID : String, ...


0

The call you have to evaluateString looks incorrect to me. The second and third arguments to evaluateString have been swapped accidentally. The second argument should be the script you need to execute (see http://www-archive.mozilla.org/rhino/apidocs/org/mozilla/javascript/Context.html#evaluateString(org.mozilla.javascript.Scriptable, java.lang.String, ...


1

I think that you are right in your assumption that Await.result does not "kill" the future. The await limits just how long the waiting code waits, it does not limit the code providing the future with the result at all. This would not be reasonable in general, since there can be many places in the program that await the result of the same future. What you ...


3

You can create a private function to handle your errors: private def tryUnsafe(f: () => String): String = { var res = f() if (res.indexOf("Error") > 0){ doSomeOtherMethod() //that can fix error res = f() } return res } Note that f is a by-name parameter, you can just call tryUnsafe like this: tryUnsafe { // code that eventually ...


1

Yes—see for example Spire's MetricSpace, which would allow you to write something like this: case class DataLine(points: List[Double]) import spire.algebra._ object manhattanDistance extends MetricSpace[DataLine, Double] { def distance(v: DataLine, w: DataLine): Double = { val ld: List[(Double, Double)] = v.points.zip(w.points) val sum = ...


0

Finally the problem was not the one asking. In fact I was saving all the json inside the session. But the problem was gatling expression like ${body2.id} works only if the session attribute is like : Map(body2 -> Map(id -> 45787)) but mine was Map(body2 -> "{ id: 45787 }") so I used Jackson library to parse my json to convert it to a map, and ...


1

It seems as though == is fine for symbols (to an extent). I don't want to try to over-interpret the scaladoc, but I don't think aliases matter with them. (I would also hope that the section on symbols would contain a similar warning.) Symbols are used to establish bindings between a name and the entity it refers to, such as a class or a method. Anything ...


0

First of all you need to create index in elastic4s. I assume you did this. client.execute { create index "myIndex" mappings ( "AThings" as( "UserName" typed StringType, "Comemnt" typed StringType, "Time" typed StringType, ) ) } if you create this index, then you can put case class into this directly. val aThings = ...


2

m-z is correct here. But one question you might ask is, Why does Scala require you to repeat the bound <: Bar when it is already required by the definition of Foo? The reason is for consistency with def blah[A](f: Foo[A]) Here [A] is going to be supplied by the caller, so Foo can't be allowed to apply any extra constraints on it (otherwise the exact ...


2

You can only call the method cumulativeProbability on an instance of class NormalDistribution. So, you will first have to create a NormalDistribution object, and then call the method on that object. Something like this: val distr = new NormalDistribution() val prob = distr.cumulativeProbability(b) I don't know what you mean by the new in this line: val ...


3

The _ in Foo[_] is an existential type. Without any type bounds on it, it will be assumed to be Any, even though Foo[B] has an upper-bound of Bar. This means that foo.bar is assumed to be Any, instead of a Bar. Thus, getBarInt(foo.bar) fails, because the compiler thinks you're passing a Any instead of a Bar. If you want the parameter to be Foo[_], then it ...


2

Rather than isInstance, you can use the ClassTag in a match expression, which is slightly clearer: def convert[T <: A](a: A)(implicit ct: ClassTag[T]) = a match { case ct(t) => Some(t) case _ => None }


1

One use case is when you need to collect first result of elements transformation: case class Transform(n: Int) { println("Transform "+n)} val list = List(1,2,3,4,5) list.view.map(v => Transform(v)).collectFirst{case Transform(3) => println("found")} Prints: Transform 1 Transform 2 Transform 3 found While: list.map(v => ...


1

I wrote my solution on C. I hope, you will able port algorithm to Java or Scala. #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> #define WIDTH 10 #define HEIGHT 22 // Convert (1 << n) to n for n == 0-10 static char bit2ndx[11] = {-1, 0, 1, 8, 2, 4, 9, 7, 3, 6, 5}; int *tetrisProfile(int *input) { int row; // ...


3

One common approach to waiting for all results (failed or not) is to "lift" failures into a new representation inside the future, so that all futures complete with some result (although they may complete with a result that represents failure). One natural way to get that is lifting to a Try. Twitter's implementation of futures provides a liftToTry method ...


0

you can use this if its only for init a Set of less then 5 items import scala.collection.immutable.Set; Set mySet = (Set<String>)new Set.Set1<String>("better") Set mySet = (Set<String>)new Set.Set2<String>("better","andmore")


3

A Future produced by Future.sequence completes when either: all the futures have completed successfully, or one of the futures has failed The second point is what's happening in your case, and it makes sense to complete as soon as one of the wrapped Future has failed, because the wrapping Future can only hold a single Throwable in the failure case. ...


-1

Yet another variant val is = List(5, 7,2, 3, 3, 3, 5, 5, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2) val ps = is.head::((is zip is.tail) collect { case (a,b) if a != b => b }) //> ps : List[Int] = List(5, 7, 2, 3, 5, 3, 2) (the is zip is.tail is doing something similar to .sliding(2))


3

In Scala, the 'middle' number in the version string is the major version, so in 2.10.x and 2.11.x, the major version is 10 and 11 respectively. Major versions are binary compatible. Therefore, if you have a library compiled against Scala 2.11.0, you can safely use it in a project that uses 2.11.6 without recompilation, and vice versa. If your library was ...


2

Starting from 2.11, scala actors are shipped as a separate library : <dependency> <groupId>org.scala-lang</groupId> <artifactId>scala-actors</artifactId> <version>2.11.6</version> </dependency> Note that they are also deprecated in favor of Akka : ...


0

It seems that the bindaddress is of a different type because it shows up differently in logs. In either case enable Akka full config printing on start with this setting in your config: log-config-on-start = on Then compare both configurations to see where they mismatch. They should work the same way if the are the same. I suspect that the way you define ...


4

You could do that very much like in Haskell def printList(x: List1) = { x match { case Cons(hd, tl) => println(hd); printList(tl) case Nil => } } Your problem is that acc != Nil is not enough for the compiler to understand that acc is a Cons. head and tail are available on Cons only. Pattern matching is the normal way to go. ...


2

No, you should use the typeclass pattern. That way the types are resolved at compile time rather than runtime, which is much safer. trait ConverterFor[T] { def convert(s: String): Option[T] } object ConverterFor { implicit def forInt = new ConverterFor[Int] { def convert(s: String) = Try(s.toInt).toOption } implicit def forDouble = ... } def ...


0

java.lang.NoSuchMethodError is a common indication of a version mismatch: One of your dependencies was compiled against a more recent version of another dependency and at runtime is provided with an earlier version that does not have that new method. In this case, you are trying to run Spark-Cassandra Connector 1.3.0-SNAPSHOT against Spark 1.1.0. Try to ...


-1

We use FasterXml for serialization and deserialization as follows. include this dependency in your build.sbt "com.fasterxml.jackson.module" %% "jackson-module-scala" % "2.4.0-rc2" Create a two helper functions toJson and fromJson to serialize and deserialize object JsonProvider { //create mapper and register scala module private val mapper ...


2

There is some space for improvement in elm's answer: 1) You don't need to compute sum 2 times. 2) You can avoid creation of additional collection with takeWhile method and use indexWhere instead. val sums = a.scanLeft(0.0)(_ + _) a.take(sums.indexWhere(_ > sums.last * 0.85) - 1)


-1

val l = List(5, 7,2, 3, 3, 3, 5, 5, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2) def f(l: List[Int]): List[Int] = l match { case Nil => Nil case x :: y :: tail if x == y => f(y::tail) case x :: tail => x :: f(tail) } println(f(l)) //List(5, 7, 2, 3, 5, 3, 2) Of course you can make it tail recursive


3

On code size, consider this oneliner, a.take( a.scanLeft(0.0)(_+_).takeWhile( _ <= a.sum * 0.85 ).size - 1 ) Here scanLeft accumulates additions. On performance, tagging intermediate values may help not to recompute same operations, namely val threshold = a.sum * 0.85 val size = a.scanLeft(0.0)(_+_).takeWhile( _ <= threshold ).size - 1 a.take( ...


1

In Scala you can make your type parameters constrained by a type bound. Here in your first method you are making your type parameter making upper bound with sub class of Container. By using your 1st method you can't pass parameter in Container class which is not sub class of your Container class. In your 2nd example you can pass parameter type instance ...


0

I do not exactly understand what your point is. Do you mean you have now 5 partitions, but after next operation you want data distributed to 10? Because having 10, but still using 5 does not make much sense… The process of sending data to new partitions has to happen sometime. When doing coalesce, you can get rid of unsued partitions, for example: if you ...


3

So... In case some one else faces the same problem in future. Basically Scala avoids semicolons by using line-endings as statement separators. So... In scala following two things are equivalent: println( "Hello" ); prinln( "World" ) And println( "Hello" ) prinln( "World" ) Now, line endings are differently represented in three most popular operating ...



Top 50 recent answers are included