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42

A scalaz-stream solution: import scalaz.std.vector._ import scalaz.syntax.traverse._ import scalaz.std.string._ val action = linesR("example.txt").map(_.trim). splitOn("").flatMap(_.traverseU { s => s.split(" ") match { case Array(form, pos) => emit(form -> pos) case _ => fail(new Exception(s"Invalid input $s")) }}) We can ...


10

PS: I wonder why Play Iteratees library has not been choosed by Martin Odersky for his course since Play is in the Typesafe stack. Does it mean Martin prefers RxScala over Play Iteratees? I'll answer this. The decision of which streaming API's to push/teach is not one that has been made just by Martin, but by Typesafe as a whole. I don't know what ...


8

The performance problem has nothing to do with the way the data is read. It is already buffered. Nothing happens until you actually iterate through the lines: // measures time taken by enclosed code def timed[A](block: => A) = { val t0 = System.currentTimeMillis val result = block println("took " + (System.currentTimeMillis - t0) + "ms") result } ...


7

In second case you are allocating Task for each pixel, and instead of directly calling printToImage you do it through Task, and it's much more steps in a call-chain. We use scalaz-stream a lot, but I strongly believe that it's overkill to use it for this type problems. Code running inside Process/Channel/Sink should much more complicated than simple ...


6

Iteratees and Stream aren't really that similar to RxJava. The crucial difference is that they are concerned with resource safety (that is, closing files, sockets, etc. once they aren't needed anymore), which requires feedback (Iteratees can tell Enumerators they are done, but Observers don't tell anything to Observables) and makes them significantly more ...


5

You need to pass src through the sink to actually write anything. I think this should do it: import scalaz.stream.{io,tcp,text} import scalaz.stream.tcp.syntax._ val p = tcp.server(addr, concurrentRequests = 1) { tcp.reads(1024).pipe(text.utf8Decode) through tcp.lift(io.stdOutLines) } p.run.run The expression src ++ tcp.lift(io.stdOutLines) should ...


5

The problem is in the implementation of stdInLines. It is blocking, it never Task.forks a thread. Try changing the implentation of stdInLines to this one: def stdInLines: Process[Task,String] = Process.repeatEval(Task.apply { Option(scala.Console.readLine()) .getOrElse(throw Cause.Terminated(Cause.End)) }) The original io.stdInLines is ...


5

I think you want something that works in a similar way to chunkBy. chunkBy emits a chunk whenever the result of a predicate function flips from true to false. You could generalise this from comparing boolean values, to comparing the result of some arbitrary function of the input. Thus, you would have a process that emits a chunk whenever the value of this ...


4

I don't think you want a Process1, I think that if you were creating a Process1 out of this you would be creating a Process1[A, Task[B]] which isn't what you want. I think you want to create a Channel that you can attach a Process to that would give you a new Process. A Channel is just an alias for a Process that produces effectful functions. type ...


4

Usually, the implementation is done with publishing the message via sink and then awaiting some sort of reply on some source, like your topic. Actually we have a lot of idioms of this in our code : def reqRply[I,O,O2](src:Process[Task,I],sink:Sink[Task,I],reply:Process[Task,O])(pf: PartialFunction[O,O2]):TSource[O2] = { merge.mergeN(Process(reply, (src ...


3

You can do it with scalaz.\/ and additional processing steps def fahrenheitToCelsius(line: String): Throwable \/ String = \/.fromTryCatchNonFatal { val fahrenheit = line.toDouble val celsius = fahrenheit // replace with real convert celsius.toString } def collectSome[T]: PartialFunction[Option[T], T] = { case ...


3

Also to clarify the previous answer delas with the "splitting" requirement. The solution to your specific issue may be without the need of splitting streams: val streamOfNumbers : Process[Task,Int] = Process.emitAll(1 to 10) val oddOrEven: Process[Task,Int\/Int] = streamOfNumbers.map { case even if even % 2 == 0 => right(even) case odd => ...


3

Another solution is to use wye.interrupt: val input = io.stdInLines.take(1).map(_ => true) val dory = Process.awakeEvery(1.second).map(_ => println("Hi!")) val process = input.wye(dory)(wye.interrupt) process.run.run


3

I think the problem is in st2 that is defined like zipping wye (w) with t2. This does nt make a sense hence wye is just description how the processes will be merged. I think t2 is Process[Task,Duration] so you will need on left side another Process[Task,Duration] and then you can use wye.merge[Duration] to merge them together like: val t1: ...


3

When you write Process(1, 2, 3), you get a Process[Nothing, Int], which is a process that doesn't have any idea about a specific context that it can make external requests against—it's just going to emit some stuff. This means that you can treat it as a Process0, for example: scala> Process(1, 2, 3).toList res0: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3) It does also ...


3

Eric, the non-deterministical interleave is implemented in scalaz-stream via Process.wye, and in fact either is one of the non-deterministical combinators using wye. The reason you see them interleave left/right is because it tries to be fair and because you blocking the thread. Try to create one side that is slower than the second one and you will see the ...


3

This combinator doesn't exist yet, but you could add it. I think it will be something like: def zipN[F[_], A](xs: Seq[Process[F,A]]): Process[F,Seq[A]] = if (xs.isEmpty) Process.halt else xs.map(_ map (Vector(_))).reduceLeft(_.zipWith(_)(_ ++ _)) You could also add zipAllN, which takes a value to pad the sequences with (and which uses zipAll, and ...


2

You're seeing this issue, which can take a number of different forms. The problem is essentially that map can see (and do stuff with) the intermediate steps that chunk is taking while it builds up its results. This behavior may change in the future, but in the meantime there are a couple of possible workarounds. One of the simplest is to wrap your expensive ...


2

To get scalaz.concurrent.Task from scala.concurrent.Future you can use Task.async, when you've got task in your hand you can do it this way: import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger import scalaz.concurrent.Task import scalaz.stream.Process.End import scalaz.stream._ val cnt = new AtomicInteger(0) val task: Task[String] = Task { ...


2

When you are doing profiling or timing, you can use Process.range to generate your inputs to isolate your actual computation from the I/O. Adapting your example: time { Process.range(0,100000).drop(40000).once.as(true).runLastOr(false).run } When I first ran this, it took about 2.2 seconds on my machine, which seems consistent with what you were seeing. ...


2

Iteratee is much harder to work with compare to scalaz-stream. Scalaz-stream as well are superior to iteratees in terms of code-reuse and composition. In fact the whole "servers" can be now implemented in scalaz-stream instead just small programs or pieces of code like with Iteratee pattern. Scalaz-stream gives you superior resource safety, termination ...


2

Finally I got what Pavel Chlupacek wanted to say. Signal looks cool, but a little bit cryptic for beginner. import scala.concurrent.{Future => SFuture} import scala.language.implicitConversions import scalaz.concurrent.Task import scalaz.stream._ import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.Implicits.global implicit class Transformer[+T](fut: ...


2

Assuming you know how to convert Future -> Task (either via implicit or via Process.transform) this shall work: def get(t:T): Task[T] = ??? val initial : T = ??? val signal = scalaz.stream.async.signal[T] // emit initial value, and follow by any change of `T` within the signal val source:Process[Task,T] = eval_(signal.set(t)) fby signal.discrete // ...


2

Not super nice solution, but works import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.Implicits.global import scala.concurrent.{Future => SFuture} import scala.language.implicitConversions import scalaz.concurrent.Task import scalaz.stream._ implicit class Transformer[+T](fut: => SFuture[T]) { def toTask(implicit ec: ...


2

'append' is not about append to file, it's a combinator to append one Process to another. I can't say what you really get with append in your case, something weird, I think you get infinite stream of functions ByteVector => Task[Unit], and that's why it never completes. You need custom fileChunkW method, for example you can do it like this: def ...


1

It should work if you remove the types from the Process.eval call: ... .onComplete(Process.eval(Task{println("Terminated!")}).drain) The problem here is that your Process.eval call constructs a Process[Task, Unit] and not a Process[Task, Nothing] as you ask for by giving the types explicity. Calling drain converts the Process[Task, Unit] to a ...


1

You can perhaps still use topic and just assure that the children processes will subscribe before you will push to topic. However please note this solution does not have any bounds on it, i.e. if you will be pushing too fast, you may encounter OOM error. def split[A](source:Process[Task,A]): Process[Task,(Process[Task,A], Proces[Task,A])]] = { val ...


1

If I understand correctly the case class A is essentially function A => Seq[B] then solution would be perhaps val sourceB: Process[Task,B] = sourceA.flatMap(emitAll(_.elems))


1

You could also use observe and to to attach multiple Sinks to a Process: val p = io.stdInLines.observe(out1).to(out2) observe is like to but echoes what is passed into the sink. So io.stdInLines.observe(out1) still emits the strings that come from stdin (that means it is of type Process[Task, String]) but also sends them to the sink out1. As Eric ...


1

Scala compiler treats Nothing a bit differently than other types, e.g the same trick won't work with Null, although it's a bottom type for all reference types. You can check subtype relationship using implicits and special method <:<, like this: scala> implicitly[Nothing <:< List[_]] res1: <:<[Nothing,List[_]] = <function1> And ...



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