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57

Type Constructors as Type Parameters M is a type parameter to one of Scalaz's main pimps, MA, that represents the Type Constructor (aka Higher Kinded Type) of the pimped value. This type constructor is used to look up the appropriate instances of Functor and Apply, which are implicit requirements to the method <**>. trait MA[M[_], A] { val value: ...


53

I assume, scalaz 7.0.x and the following imports (look at answer history for scalaz 6.x): import scalaz._ import Scalaz._ The state type is defined as State[S, A] where S is type of the state and A is the type of the value being decorated. The basic syntax to create a state value makes use of the State[S, A] function: // Create a state computation ...


49

Hieko Seeberger has recently started blogging on functional programming and category theory applied to Scala. Two opening posts are very educative (and easy to read), and can help getting over the initial barrier in learning scalaz. EDIT: When you get comfortable with the fundamentals, I would recommend you to read through http://apocalisp.wordpress.com/ ...


37

A scalaz-stream solution: import scalaz.std.vector._ import scalaz.syntax.traverse._ import scalaz.std.string._ val action = linesR("example.txt").map(_.trim). splitOn("").flatMap(_.traverseU { _.split(" ") match { case Array(form, pos) => emit(form -> pos) case pieces => wrap(fail(new Exception("Invalid input ...


26

Let's shine a different light on this. PartialFunction[A, B] is isomorphic to A => Option[B]. (Actually, to be able to check if it is defined for a given A without triggering evaluation of the B, you would need A => LazyOption[B]) So if we can find a Monoid[A => Option[B]] we've proved your assertion. Given Monoid[Z], we can form Monoid[A => ...


21

Fairly straightforward Scalaz solution (not very general) You can use a semigroup instance to wrap up a lot of the details: import scalaz._, Scalaz._ case class Foo(a: Option[String], b: Option[String], c: Option[String]) implicit object fooSemigroup extends Semigroup[Foo] { def fromFoo(f: Foo) = (f.a.fst, f.b.fst, f.c.fst) def toFoo(t: ...


21

I use it https://github.com/scalaj/scalaj-http import scalaj.http.Http Http("http://foo.com/search").param("q", "monkeys").asString // or val result = Http.postData("http://example.com/url", """{"id":"12","json":"data"}""") .header("Content-Type", "application/json") .header("Charset", "UTF-8") .option(HttpOptions.readTimeout(10000)) ...


21

I wrote a series of posts on my blog on this topic, and then compiled it together: learning Scalaz


19

About monad transformers This is a very short introduction. You may find more information on haskellwiki or this great slide by @jrwest. Monads don't compose, meaning that if you have a monad A[_] and a monad B[_], then A[B[_]] can not be derived automatically. However in most cases this can be achieved by having a so-called monad transformer for a given ...


18

here is a great tutorial https://github.com/jrwest/learn_you_a_scalaz


17

There are also some video resources I have seen presenting scalaz at an introductory level, http://vimeo.com/10482466 http://vimeo.com/15264203 They are both given by contributors to scalaz and introduce the contents and concepts illustrated by evolving a series of code examples. The audiences for both these talks were Scala enthusiast groups.


16

scala> val (x, y) = (Some(4), Some(9)) x: Some[Int] = Some(4) y: Some[Int] = Some(9) scala> def f(x: Int, y: Int) = Math.max(x, y) f: (x: Int,y: Int)Int scala> for(x0 <- x; y0 <- y) yield f(x0, y0) res26: Option[Int] = Some(9) scala> val x = None x: None.type = None scala> for(x0 <- x; y0 <- y) yield f(x0, y0) res27: ...


16

There's a function that turns a List[Option[A]] into an Option[List[A]] in Scalaz. It's sequence and it's defined on MA. To get None in case any of the elements are None and a Some[List[A]] in case all the elements are Some, you can just do this: lo.sequence This method actually turns F[G[A] into G[F[A]] for all F for which there exists an implementation ...


16

It's a Different List, along the lines of "Difference List as functions" scala> val (l1, l2, l3) = (List(1, 2, 3), List(4, 5, 6), List(7, 8, 9)) l1: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3) l2: List[Int] = List(4, 5, 6) l3: List[Int] = List(7, 8, 9) Efficient prepending: scala> l1 ::: l2 ::: l3 res8: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9) Inefficient ...


16

This is the most comprehensive comparison I have seen so far: http://doc.akka.io/docs/misc/Comparison_between_4_actor_frameworks.pdf via http://klangism.tumblr.com/post/2497057136/all-actors-in-scala-compared


16

There is a pair of methods <-: and :-> defined on MAB[M[_,_], A, B] that map on the left and right side of any M[A, B] as long as there is a Bifunctor[M]. Validation happens to be a bifunctor, so you can do this: ((_:NumberFormatException).toString) <-: "123".parseInt Scala's type inference generally flows from left to right, so this is actually ...


16

Your code only needs to be slightly modified in order to use State and Traverse: // using scalaz-seven import scalaz._ import Scalaz._ def findMatches(divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int]) = { // the "state" we carry when traversing case class S(matches: List[(Int, Int)], remaining: List[Int]) // initially there are no found pairs and a full list of ...


16

The most significant argument in favor of Try is that it's in the standard library. It's also used in the standard library—for example the callbacks you register with Future's onComplete must be functions from Try. It may be used more extensively in the standard library in the future. The fact that it's in the standard library also means it'll look familiar ...


15

This error is fairly opaque, even by Scala's standards. Method names ending with = are treated specially -- they are first considered as a normal identifier, and failing that, they are expanded to a self assignment. scala> def env[A] = 0 env: [A]Int scala> env >>= 0 <console>:7: error: reassignment to val env >>= 0 ...


15

To understand the result, you need to understand the Comonad[NonEmptyList] instance. Comonad[W] essentially provides three functions (the actual interface in Scalaz is a little different, but this helps with explanation): map: (A => B) => W[A] => W[B] copure: W[A] => A cojoin: W[A] => W[W[A]] So, Comonad provides an interface for some ...


15

Edit 2: While thinking about the cataX method, I figured out that cataX is nothing else than a plain and simple fold. Using that, we can get a pure scala solution without any additional libraries. So, here it is: ( (amt /: floor)(_ max _) /: cap)(_ min _) which is the same as cap.foldLeft( floor.foldLeft(amt)(_ max _) )(_ min _) (not that this is ...


15

The key to functional programming is abstraction, and composability of abstractions. Monads, Arrows, Lenses, these are all abstractions which have proven themselves useful, mostly because they are composable. You've asked for a "prescriptive" answer, but I'm going to say no. Perhaps you're not convinced that functional programming matters? I'm sure plenty ...


15

Scalaz happens to have a template generator for Intellij compatibility that has the operator and common name for quite a few scalaz operators, you just have to look through the code a bit(and maybe translate some unicode): https://github.com/scalaz/scalaz/blob/master/etc/intellij/livetemplate/generate-live-templates.scala From the file: method("map", ...


14

Not quite as terse as the scalaz version, but on the other hand, no dependencies, List(floor.getOrElse(Double.NegativeInfinity), cap.getOrElse(Double.PositiveInfinity), amt).sorted.apply(1)


14

scalaz.Monad, and the family of related type classes, abstract some common functionality across a vast array of types. Scalaz provides general purpose functions that work for any Monad; and you can write your own functions in the same fashion. Without this abstraction, you are forced to write these functions for each new monadic type that you encounter, ...


14

Scalaz adds a method |+| for any type A for which a Semigroup[A] is available. If you mapped your Maps so that each value was a single-element sequence, then you could use this quite simply: scala> a.mapValues(Seq(_)) |+| b.mapValues(Seq(_)) res3: scala.collection.immutable.Map[Int,Seq[java.lang.String]] = Map(1 -> List(one, un), 2 -> List(two, ...


14

you need to import Validation.Monad._ since >=> requires a Bind[M] scala> import scalaz._, Scalaz._ import scalaz._ import Scalaz._ scala> def f: Int => Validation[String, Int] = i => if(i % 2 == 0) Success(i * 2) else Failure("Odd!") f: Int => scalaz.Validation[String,Int] scala> def g: Int => Validation[String, Int] = i => ...


13

Live Templates XML file should be placed under IDEA configuration directory, templates subdirectory. IDEA configuration folder location would depend on your platform: Windows: USERPROFILE\.IntelliJIdeaXX\config Linux: ~/.IntelliJIdeaXX/config Mac OS X: ~/Library/Preferences/IntelliJIdeaXX Where XX is IDEA version (90 for IDEA 9.x). Make sure to ...


13

@RahulG's answer exploits the fact that Option is a Monad (even though there is no type to represent this in the Scala library. The compiler expands the for comprehension to the following: def a: Option[Int] def b: Option[Int] val calc: Option[Int] = a flatMap {aa => b map {bb => aa + bb}} You can also treat it as an Applicative Functor, with some ...


13

class When[A](a: A) { def when(f: A => Boolean)(g: A => A) = if (f(a)) g(a) else a } implicit def whenever[A](a: A) = new When(a) Example: scala> "fish".when(_.length<5)(_.toUpperCase) res2: java.lang.String = FISH



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