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41

In Practice No, it can not be done, at least not in a meaningful way. Consider this Haskell code action :: Int -> IO String action n = print n >> getLine This takes n first, prints it (IO performed here), then reads a line from the user. Assume we had an hypothetical transform :: (a -> IO b) -> IO (a -> b). Then as a mental ...


12

Your intuition that these two monads are closely related is exactly right. The difference is that Writer is much more limited, in that it doesn't allow you to read the accumulated state (until you cash out at the end). The only thing you can do with the state in a Writer is tack more stuff onto the end. More concisely, State[S, A] is a kind of wrapper for S ...


12

It's already defined for Option: def or[A](x: Option[A], y: Option[A]) = x orElse y


12

You can use the ReaderT monad transformer to compose the Reader monad and the Try monad into a single monad that you can use a for-comprehension on, etc. ReaderT is just a type alias for Kleisli, and you can use Kleisli.kleisli instead of Reader.apply to construct your Reader-y computations. Note that you need scalaz-contrib for the monad instance for Try ...


10

sequence is used to gather together applicative effects. More concretely, it lets you "flip" F[G[A]] to G[F[A]], provided G is Applicative and F is Traversable. So we can use it to "pull together" a bunch of Applicative effects (note all Monads are Applicative): List(Future.successful(1), Future.successful(2)).sequence : Future[List[Int]] // = ...


9

The problem is that the modify you get with the usual imports is from State, and isn't going to help you with StateT. It's a good idea to start with the Haskell type signature: test3 :: (MonadState [Char] m, MonadState s (t m), MonadTrans t, Num s) => t m (s, [Char]) Which you should be able to translate into something like this: import ...


8

The performance problem has nothing to do with the way the data is read. It is already buffered. Nothing happens until you actually iterate through the lines: // measures time taken by enclosed code def timed[A](block: => A) = { val t0 = System.currentTimeMillis val result = block println("took " + (System.currentTimeMillis - t0) + "ms") result } ...


8

The shortest is probably (x ++ y).reduceLeftOption(f) which works because of an implicit conversion from Option to Iterable which happens to have a method that does exactly what you need.


8

Noah's answer is basically right, but you should always use traverse instead of a map followed by a sequence—the two are equivalent but the former is clearer and a little more efficient: def anotherFunc: Throwable \/ List[String] = personList.flatMap { pl => pl.traverseU { p => for { // I assume you're doing something more interesting ...


8

This is a special case of structural typing but called a 'type lambda', if you search for type lambda scala google will give you some results. In short, it's used in a similar fashion as partially applied functions. def x(a:Int, b:Int):Int = a * b val x10 = x(10, _:Int) x10(2) // 2 An example with types. type IntEither[B] = Either[Int, B] val ...


8

The problem is that there's already a Semigroup for List[A] for any A. You've defined a more specific instance for List[Staff], which leads to an ambiguity, as you can see by asking for the instance: scala> Semigroup[List[Staff]] <console>:17: error: ambiguous implicit values: both method listMonoid in trait ListInstances of type [A]=> ...


8

There is a compiler plugin called wartremover, that provides what you want. https://github.com/typelevel/wartremover It has error messages and warning for some scala functions, that should be avoided for safety. This is the description of the OptionPartial wart from the github readme page: scala.Option has a get method which will throw if the value is ...


8

I noticed this too. It also happens with the akka.pattern package from Akka as well as for example the upickle package from the upickle project. Those three packages have two things in common: They are package objects They define at least one type in a mixin trait. So I did a little experiment with two projects: Project A: trait SomeFunctionality { ...


8

For the sake of a complete example, suppose we have the following types and some example data: import shapeless._, tag._ trait PID; trait PName; trait PWeight type ProductId = Int @@ PID type Name = String @@ PName type Weight = Double @@ PWeight case class Product(pid: ProductId, name: Name, weight: Weight) val pid = tag[PID](13) val name = ...


7

Interestingly operator precedence as defined for symbolic methods doesn't seem to hold for symbolic type aliases. Instead infix type aliases are always evaluated left associative: type -[A,B] = Map[A,B] type /[A,B] = Map[A,B] // '/' has higher precedence than '-' as an operator classOf[A - B / C] // Class[/[-[A,B],C]] classOf[A / B - C] // ...


7

If you're willing to use Scalaz (and it sounds like you are), \/ (usually pronounced "disjunction") is exactly what you're looking for—a monadic, right-biased version of Either. It also includes lots of other nice stuff you don't get with the right projection of Either in the standard library (1.right syntax, combinators like +++, converters from ...


7

Here's a simple example. Suppose I want to pick a random size for a range, and then pick a random index inside that range, and then return both the range and the index. The second computation of a random value clearly depends on the first—I need to know the size of the range in order to pick a value in the range. This kind of thing is specifically what ...


7

Yes, it's possible, but you have to specify the types, and since this is a cast that can fail at runtime, you'll get the results wrapped in Option: import shapeless._, syntax.std.traversable._ val hlists = frame.map(_.toHList[Int :: String :: String :: Boolean :: HNil]) Now hlists has type Vector[Option[Int :: String :: String :: Boolean :: HNil]], and ...


6

Both the standard library and Scalaz provide this operation as merge: scala> val e: Either[String, String] = Right("a") e: Either[String,String] = Right(a) scala> e.merge res0: String = a And: scala> import scalaz._, Scalaz._ import scalaz._ import Scalaz._ scala> val ez: String \/ String = "a".right ez: scalaz.\/[String,String] = \/-(a) ...


6

Mandubian is correct, the flatMap of StateT doesn't allow you to bypass stack accumulation because of the creation of the new StateT immediately before calling the wrapped monad's bind (which would be a Free[Function0] in your case). So Trampoline can't help, but the Free Monad over the functor for State is one way to ensure stack safety. We want to go ...


6

I'm going to assume that by Validation(T) you mean something like ValidationNel[Throwable, T], since Validation[T] isn't anything and Validation[E, T] doesn't have an applicative functor instance unless E has a semigroup instance. What you're looking for is probably traverse (or traverseU if you want to avoid writing out the type parameters). You can write ...


6

This is the Apply syntax. I recently added some examples of using the apply syntax to the examples sub-project of scalaz, you can see specifically some discussion of *> and <* here: https://github.com/scalaz/scalaz/blob/series/7.2.x/example/src/main/scala/scalaz/example/ApplyUsage.scala#L94-L130 The idea is that you are evaluating two 'effectful' ...


6

The most convenient way to do this kind of thing is usually to write your own type class. Here's a quick working sketch: import shapeless._ trait T[I, O] extends (I => O) trait Pipeline[P <: HList] { type In type Out type Values <: HList } object Pipeline { type Aux[P <: HList, In0, Out0, Values0 <: HList] = Pipeline[P] { type ...


5

The ListT monad transformer in Scalaz is actually a little better than your first version (or at least more concise—you only have to worry about one layer): import scalaz._, Scalaz._ val a = ListT(List(1, 2, 3).some) val b = for { el <- a } yield el + 1 Or equivalently: val b = a.map(_ + 1) Here a and b are both instances of ListT[Option, Int]. ...


5

Validation does not have a Bind defined for it. In Scalaz 7.1.0-M5 (M6 too) Validation.flatMap is deprecated and in an attempt at subverting the warning, it looks like the precedence of flatMap is losing to scalaz.syntax.bind._, which is part of the Scalaz._ import. See this commit ...


5

If you flatMap the personList and then sequenceU the inner list you can basically flatten your return type: def anotherFunc: \/[Throwable, List[String]] = { personList.flatMap( pl => pl.map( p => for { s <- Option("fakeString").\/>(new Throwable("not found")) } yield s ...


5

Just flatMap and sequenceU, it's all in scalaz: def flatten(e: \/[Throwable,List[\/[Throwable,Int]]]): \/[Throwable,List[Int]] = { e.flatMap(a => a.sequenceU) }


5

Monad transformers are the way to go if you want to avoid the nested sequencing. In this case you want an OptionT[Future, A] (which is equivalent to Future[Option[A]]): import scalaz._, Scalaz._ import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.Implicits.global import scala.concurrent.Future val xs = List(OptionT(Future(some(1))), OptionT(Future(some(2)))) val ys = ...


5

Here's the same issue in a much simpler case: scala> import scalaz._, Scalaz._ import scalaz._ import Scalaz._ scala> Option(1) |+| Option(2) res0: Option[Int] = Some(3) scala> Monoid[Option[Int]].append(Some(1), Some(2)) res1: Option[Int] = Some(3) scala> Some(1) |+| Some(2) <console>:14: error: value |+| is not a member of Some[Int] ...


5

You can filter the items from each list that aren't included in the other one using scala's filterNot function: val idsForDeletion = existingIds.filterNot(incomingIds.toSet) val idsForInsertion = incomingIds.filterNot(existingIds.toSet)



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