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0

Ideally, maximumsBy will return the maximums in the same type of container as was provided. To do this efficiently seems to require scalaz.Reducer, a typeclass that models append- and prepend- to a container. import scalaz._ import Ordering._ import std.AllInstances._ object Maximums extends App { def maximumsBy[F[_]: Foldable, A, B: Order](fa: ...


2

You can do something like that implicit def MaxNonEmptyListSemigroup[A : Order]: Semigroup[NonEmptyList[A]] = new Semigroup[NonEmptyList[A]] { def append(l1: NonEmptyList[A], l2: =>NonEmptyList[A]): NonEmptyList[A] = Order[A].apply(l1.head, l2.head) match { case GT => l1 case LT => l2 case EQ => l1 append l2 } } ...


4

You could use Option, take, flatten, and collect together for a pretty clean version: def foo(f: (Int, Int, Int) => String, ois: List[Option[Int]]) = Option(ois.take(3).flatten) collect { case List(a, b, c) => f(a, b, c) } ois.take(3).flatten will only match List(a,b,c) if the first three elements are Some. You wrap the variable in ...


3

It's an in-joke: IvoryTower is a port of a Haskell type called RealWorld. (I do wish it had a clearer name - this one manages to be both impenetrable to newcomers and not actually funny). See e.g. https://wiki.haskell.org/IO_inside .


3

You can think of it as arriving at the same place by two different routes. On one side you start with the reader monad, which is simply a kind of wrapper for functions. Then you realize that you want to integrate this reader functionality into a larger monad with other "effects", so you create a ReaderT monad transformer. At that point it makes sense to ...


3

You've constructed a list with two items, a String and a Nil. So the type of that list is NonEmptyList[A], where A is the lowest common supertype of both String and Nil, which is the type Serializable. Btw: the same thing happens with scala's normal List: List("5",Nil)


1

For the sake of completeness: because this is a disjunction, you'll never have to worry about "merging" errors—either the whole thing is an Errs on the left side, or it's a right with an Errs on the left. It can't be both at the same time. If you want to collapse the two levels, t1.flatMap(identity) will turn Errs \/ (Errs \/ Boolean) into a plain old Errs ...


1

This uses a very simple library called product-collecions import com.github.marklister.collections.io._ case class UserClass(i:Int, j:Int, s:String) val csv = Seq("1,2,toto", "3,4,titi").mkString("\n") csv: String = 1,2,toto 3,4,titi CsvParser(UserClass).parse(new java.io.StringReader(csv)) res28: Seq[UserClass] = List(UserClass(1,2,toto), ...


8

You can do this pretty nicely with the new-ish Monocle support in Argonaut (I'm using Argonaut master here, since the 6.1 milestones are still on Monocle 0.5): import argonaut._, Argonaut._ import scalaz._, Scalaz._ import monocle._, Monocle._ val lens = Parse.parseOptional ^<-? jObjectPrism ^|-? index("a") ^<-? jArrayPrism ...


6

They are isomorphic, but not the same value. EitherT[Option,A,B] wraps a value of type Option[Either[A,B]] in order to provide different behavior. Let's look at the definition: final case class EitherT[F[_], A, B](run: F[A \/ B]) So EitherT here is wrapping an Option, and the value named run is a value which is of type Option[Either[A,B]]


0

Solved by noted two mistake I made: misunderstood about type of initial/carried over value, it should be List[Int] instead of \/ one has to explicit declare type parameter of foldLeftM scala> def func(i: Int) = { | if( i > 1 ) { println{"!!"} ;"error".left[Int]} | else i.right[String] | } func: (i: Int)scalaz.\/[String,Int] scala> val ...


3

You can try to iterate until there is no change: def getValues(dict: Map[String, List[String]]) = Iterator.iterate(dict) { _.mapValues { _.flatMap(v => v :: dict.get(v).toList.flatten).toSet.toList } filterNot { _._2.isEmpty } }.sliding(2) find { x => x.head == x.last } This definitely is not the most efficient solution, but it is ...


1

Try this code: def f(map: Map[String, List[String]]): Map[String, List[String]] = { def f(x: Map[String, List[String]], acc: Map[String, List[String]]): Map[String, List[String]] = { if (x.isEmpty) acc else { val keys = x.keySet val (complex, simple) = x partition {_._2 exists {s => keys contains s}} val newX = (for ...


3

Here are two benefits as examples—I'm sure you could come up with others. First, it can be useful to abstract over different arrows, such as Kleisli[M, ?, ?] and ? => ?. For example, I can write a generic function that will apply an endomorphism a certain number of times. def applyX10[Arr[_, _]: Category, A](f: Arr[A, A]) = ...


0

It turned out that the gist that I have posted works fine -it was an issue with Intellij gist.github.com/kumaramit01/80ca29b46d2c07e55b0b Intellij kept on indicating syntax error when I had return type defined as Input[String] :: Input[Int] :: Input[Long] :: HNil Amit


7

The fully unapplied Kleisli isn't much of anything—it has kind (* -> *) -> * -> * -> *, and I don't know of any meaningful type classes for that kind. If you have a monad for a type constructor F[_], though, then Kleisli[F, ?, ?] is an Arrow (which is a type class for things of kind * -> * -> *). Similarly, if F[_] has a functor instance, ...


3

It is indeed a Monoid, and you can be much more precise : it is a List[String] (up to an isomporphism). ValidationResult is indeed isomorphic to a List[String], with Success for Nil, and andAlso is concatenation ::: / ++. This makes sense, a ValidationResult is a list of errors, and when there are none, that means success. However, as you note right at ...


1

I added some examples to the scalaz source a while back which are relevant. I added examples of using composed Apply instances (Apply is Applicative without the point method): https://github.com/scalaz/scalaz/blob/series/7.2.x/example/src/main/scala/scalaz/example/ApplyUsage.scala#L132-L147 but yes, for any M1[_] for which we have Applicative[M1] and M2[_] ...


3

Your version desugars to something very similar to the following: goodTL.map(_.flatten.filter(_ != 2)) This is a case where I personally find the sugar-free version a lot clearer about what's going on.


4

The types M and A are referenced from your def so they need to be part of the thing you're returning. I can't see any way to do this completely with the structural refinement, so I think you have to define a parametrized class; how about defining an implicit class rather than the implicit def? implicit class PimpedApplicative[M[_]: Applicative, A, B](mf: ...


1

I think you should be able to encode your state machine through a recursive Process1[Message, Message] like this def fsm(state: ServerState): Process1[Message, Message] = { receive1 { msg: Message => (msg, state) match { case (Query, Disconnected) => emit(StartupMessage) fby fsm(Authenticating) case (AuthenticationOk, ...


2

Look at this one, it's my question regarding Seq and Try that will give you an idea how to work this out. Using for-comprehension, Try and sequences in Scala You can also checkout how scalaZ does this for Option: https://github.com/scalaz/scalaz/blob/796c011b057235401de3c7261ac1b390b74484f4/core/src/main/scala/scalaz/OptionT.scala



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