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3

Convert the following oneliner to an script: perl -MList::Util=product -E 'say product(@ARGV),",",product(1..@ARGV)' -- 3 3 4 5 prints 180,24


3

If you are under some Unix terminal (xterm, gnome-terminal ...), you can use console codes: #include <stdio.h> #define clear() printf("\033[H\033[J") #define gotoxy(x,y) printf("\033[%d;%dH", (x), (y)) int main(void) { int number; clear(); printf( "Enter your number in the box below\n" "+-----------------+\n" "| ...


2

In the linux terminal you may use terminal commands to move your cursor, such as printf("\033[8;5Hhello"); // Move to (8, 5) and output hello other similar commands: printf("\033[XA"); // Move up X lines; printf("\033[XB"); // Move down X lines; printf("\033[XC"); // Move right X column; printf("\033[XD"); // Move left X column; printf("\033[2J"); // ...


2

The C language itself doesn't have any notion of a screen with a cursor. You'll have to use some kind of library that provides this support. curses is the most well-known and widely available library for terminal control.


2

A solution: Extrating the path from an NSURL. Then looking at each path components to extract the coordinates components : NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:@"https://www.google.com.au/maps/search/nearest+pizza+shop/@-27.4823545,153.0297855,12z/data=!3m1!4b1"]; NSArray *components = [url.path componentsSeparatedByString:@"/"]; NSArray *results = nil; for ...


2

ZXing can read existent images, its Decode method takes WritableBitmap as a parameter. So you can get the image from user library with PhotoChooserTask, get WritableBitmap and read it. Using ZXing is demonstrated here: http://developer.nokia.com/community/wiki/Generating_and_scanning_barcodes_using_ZXing_on_Windows_Phone ...


1

You can use single column value filter to set whether a row is returned or not based on value in a single column. Example: Filter filter = new SingleColumnValueFilter(Bytes.toBytes("addr"), Bytes.toBytes("city"), CompareOp.EQUAL, Bytes.toBytes("Chicago")); scan.setFilter(filter); ResultScanner rs = table.getScanner(scan);


1

Just don't call printf, if you don't want to display anything. do { if (DataCount == DATA_COUNT_I_WANT) { printf("%d.", DataCount); printf(" %s", stockF[DataCount].def); printf(" %s", stockL[DataCount].def2); printf("\n"); } DataCount=DataCount+1; //Next line ...


1

I'd guess you need to enclose &curLimOrDed - 1 into %EVAL() function in order to have it evaluated as you expect: %EVAL(&curLimOrDed - 1) Except of this, the error message actually states the problem: The condition was: prevLimOrDed That's because in your statement: lowerLimOrDed = %Scan(&limOrDedOption,prevLimOrDed, &curLimOrDed. - ...


1

Using fscanf seems not only like overkill, but platform-dependent. Why not just call readline enough times to get the line you want?


1

You're performing an INDEX RANGE SCAN because of the WHERE clause of your SQL statement: select a,b,c from demo_full_index_scan where a = 1; I'm assuming here that you don't have a unique index on A despite the uniqueness of the column, i.e. your table DDL is something like this: create table demo_full_index_scan ( a number , b number , c number , ...


1

BluetoothDevice.getName() may return null if the name could not be determined. This could be due to any number of factors. Regardless, the name is the friendly name of the device, and shouldn't be used to distinguish it from other devices. Instead, use the hardware address through getAddress().



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