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2

You can enumerate the characters and apply the attributes like this. NSString * string = @"C3OC2OH4"; NSMutableAttributedString * attributedString = [NSMutableAttributedString new]; NSDictionary * subscriptAttributes = @{NSFontAttributeName : [UIFont systemFontOfSize:10.0], NSBaselineOffsetAttributeName : @(-5.0)}; ...


0

The problem is that you aren't calling your functions in main. Your code will compile, (although you might want to have some indents/spaces for readability... Ctrl+A then Ctrl+I will help somewhat) but you will not get any results. Here is what you have to do: import java.util.Scanner; public class Sorting { public static void main(String[] args){ ...


-1

You do not call the printValues function. You also do not call the sorting function. The code inside a function is only executed once you call it. Also I would suggest indenting the code so that things inside two braces are indented twice etc.


0

Try this code, You should call insertionSort(num, num.length) method and printValues(int[] list) inside main method. I modified the return type of insertionSort method as well. public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println("Enter 10 numbers to be sorted separated with spaces:"); String values = new Scanner(System.in).nextLine(); ...


-1

To start, you nested a function within main. I don't think you can do that. Please separate them (I'll show an example) and see if that helps you. Also, be careful with user input. Assume the user is going to make mistakes, and program defensively. What if I were to type "Hello" into this program? It would throw a hard exception and crash. Try to prevent ...


0

It doesn't seem that scroll requires scan but rather you can use both together if wanted.


0

ArrayList<String> arrayList = new ArrayList<String>(); then in the try block of findSocket before return true; arayList.add(ip);


4

This appears to be a locale issue. Based on the comments, the default local decimal separator on OP's system is ',' rather than '.'. Thus Scanner by default refuses to recognize 3.2 and only recognizes 3,2. To make the Scanner accept 3.2, you can manually set its locale: scan.useLocale(Locale.US);


0

As Hovercraft Says in the comments, the problem maybe with the .nextDouble&.nextInt() as it stays in the same line. you should go to next line to read another number via .nextLine() after each .nextDouble() and .nextInt() event after .next() if you use it in the future. Here a testable example I created for you. Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in); ...



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